natural disaster

Flagship PBS Series NOVA Looks at the Science of 2018 Kīlauea Eruption

PBS HAWAI‘I – News Release

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January 17, 2019

 

HONOLULU, HI – PBS’ flagship science series NOVA will take a scientific deep dive into last year’s Kīlauea Volcano eruption, in a program airing Wednesday, January 23, at 9:00 pm on PBS Hawaiʻi.

 

NOVA - Kīlauea: Hawaiʻi on Fire

 

Kīlauea: Hawaiʻi on Fire investigates the geological causes of the state’s most destructive volcanic eruption in generations. It displaced thousands of residents. NOVA’s filmmakers were on the ground last year as Kīlauea spewed molten lava and threw out bombs of volcanic rock as big as refrigerators.

 

In this program, Hawai`i scientists explain the underground system of lava rivers and the monumental changes this eruption made on the surface of the land and below.

 

Watch a Preview of this program

 

 

NOVA
Sinkholes: Buried Alive

 

In Tampa, Florida, in February 2013, a giant hole opened up under the bedroom floor of Jeffrey Bush, swallowing the 36-year-old as he slept. His body was never found. Bush was a victim of a sinkhole – a growing worldwide hazard that lurks wherever limestone and other water-soluble rocks underpin the soil. When carbon dioxide in the air dissolves in rainwater, it forms a weak acid that attacks the soft rocks, riddling them with holes. Sinkholes can occur gradually when the surface subsides into bowl-shaped depressions or suddenly, when the ground gives way – often catastrophically.

 

NOVA
Killer Landslides

 

In less than two minutes in March of this year, a one-square-mile field of debris slammed into the Washington state community of Oso, killing 41 and destroying nearly 50 homes. Drawing on analyses of other recent landslides around the world, geologists are investigating what triggered the deadliest U.S. landslide in decades and whether climate change is increasing the risk of similar disasters around the globe.