neighbor

MISTER ROGERS:
IT’S YOU I LIKE

MISTER ROGERS: IT’S YOU I LIKE

 

Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, the pioneering PBS series that premiered nationally 50 years ago, is an enduring landmark in the world of children’s television and beyond. Hosted by Michael Keaton, this commemorative special features Whoopi Goldberg, Chris Kratt, John Lithgow, Yo-Yo Ma and Esperanza Spalding, along with and neighbors “Handyman” Joe Negri and David “Mr. McFeely” Newell.

 

Preview

 

 

 

Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

Won't You Be My Neighbor? Fred Rogers (left) with Francois Scarborough Clemmons (right) in an episode of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood

 

One of the most celebrated theatrical releases of 2018, this feature length documentary takes an intimate look at America’s favorite neighbor: Fred Rogers. The film tells the story of a soft-spoken minister, puppeteer, writer and producer whose show was beamed daily into homes across America for more than 30 years. In his beloved television program, Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, Rogers and his cast of puppets and friends spoke directly to young children about some of life’s weightiest issues in a simple, direct fashion. There hadn’t been anything like Mister Rogers on television before, and there hasn’t been since.

 

Preview

 

 

 

ORCHARD HOUSE:
Home of Little Women

 

ORCHARD HOUSE: HOME OF LITTLE WOMEN is a captivating documentary that transports viewers to a 350-year-old home in Concord, Massachusetts with literary and historical significance unlike any other. It is here that the classic novel, Little Women, was written and set. With a nurturing, talented family as owners and literary giants Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, and Nathaniel Hawthorne as neighbors, Orchard House uniquely inspired Louisa May Alcott to write Little Women at a desk in her room that her father made especially for her. The documentary uncovers a fascinating piece of living history — a pilgrimage site for scholars and fans alike. This enduring and lively house speaks to the power of place in a way few American homes ever have. It also reveals the powerful historical, literary, and very human elements of the home and the people who lived there. ORCHARD HOUSE chronicles its history through archival photographs, letters and journal entries from one of the most well-documented families in American literary history, along with interviews of scholars and fans — including world class artists, Pulitzer Prize-winning authors, and first-time visitors — in this entertaining and informative family-friendly film.

 

 

JOSEPH ROSENDO’S TRAVELSCOPE
Portugal – from Porto to Salamanca

 

Joseph’s Portugal adventures reach into the country and cross over the border on an Iberian Peninsula exploration that reveals some of the unknown aspects of Portuguese life and its complementary relationship with its Spanish neighbor.

 

 

POV
Pervert Park

 

This film explores the people nobody wants as their neighbors. Founded by the mother of a convicted sex offender, Florida Justice Transitions is a trailer park that is home to 120 sex offenders struggling to reintegrate into society. Their crimes range from misdemeanors to unthinkable acts, and they are each fighting different battles and demons. The film considers how the destructive cycle of sexual abuse – and the silence surrounding it – can be broken.

 

Note: Contains mature content which may not be suitable for all audiences. Viewer discretion is advised.

 

“Won’t You Be My Neighbor?”
–Mister Rogers

Trolley: Thank you for being our neighbor!

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiYour team at PBS Hawai‘i took a cue from our favorite guy in a sweater, Mister Rogers, and invited scores of neighboring businesses to an open house. After a half-century in Manoa, we’re newbies in a new home across town at Nimitz Highway and Sand Island Access Road. We’re honored to occupy this building created by the people of Hawai‘i.

 

Staff members took individuals and groups on tours through our building, and there was time along the way to stop and get acquainted. “I watched your building going up,” said Curtis Sasaki of next-door office-supplies distributor Conrad Enterprises, a family business. “Thanks for having me over. I’m curious to see the inside, the TV part.” He told us about his own company’s move into the neighborhood, back in 1988, from Kakaako.

 

Our other next-door neighbor is Storage Castle, with the turret wall on Nimitz. The self storage company’s Richard Parry made a good point: “A lot of people think of residential communities when they think of neighbors. But when you think of how much time you spend at work, we need to think of fellow businesses as neighbors and support each other if we can.”

 

We felt terrific support even before we moved in, as the big dog in the ‘hood, Matson, contributed $50,000 to our NEW HOME Campaign.

 

Matson’s affable Gary Nakamatsu motioned to the windows facing Nimitz. “All those drivers go past this area on Nimitz Highway – they just drive right by and they don’t see the great variety of businesses here that do a lot for our state.”

 

Variety, indeed! The Sand Island business district is a crazy quilt of industry and industriousness. Construction companies, candy sales, landscapers, document-shredding, a bakery, garbage collection, balloons, restaurants, dry cleaning, a cement maker, musical instruments. And of course, the Coast Guard. Among organizations that came by to say hi and check out our open, cheerful new work space were Honolulu Disposal Service, McDonald’s, First Hawaiian Bank, New Hope Oahu, Office Pavilion, and a scrappy entrepreneur, Primo Popcorn, owned by the multi-generational Sato family. They’re fearless in translating new flavors to popcorn. Prime rib, end cut? You got it. Kim chee? No problem. Baked potato? Here you go.

 

Each establishment has a story. And of course, we love stories. Our mission is advancing learning and discovery, through multi-media storytelling.

 

We’re glad to add another dash of variety to the neighborhood mix. Thank you, Sand Island area businesses, for being our neighbors.

 

A hui hou kakou—until next time,
Leslie signature

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Neighbor Island Doctor Shortage

 

Hawai‘i is nearly 900 doctors short of what we need to meet our medical needs, according to the University of Hawai‘i’s John A. Burns School of Medicine. This shortfall is expected to widen to 1,500 in the next five years. The shortage of primary care doctors and specialists is most serious on the neighbor islands, where many people go without medical care, or fly to Oahu or elsewhere for treatment. INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I explores what it may take to attract and retain primary care providers on our neighbor islands.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights