New Deal

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
Grand Coulee Dam

 

Grand Coulee was more than a dam – it was a proclamation. In the wake of the Great Depression, America turned from private enterprise to public works, not simply to provide jobs, but to restore faith. The ultimate expression of Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal, Grand Coulee played a central role in transforming the Northwest; it was the largest hydroelectric power-producing facility in the world when it was completed in March 1941. After WWII, a vast irrigation project made possible by the dam helped turn the barren deserts of central Washington into rich farmland. But the dam prevented access to one of the greatest salmon rivers in the world. Deprived of the salmon, their most important resource, the native people who lived along the Columbia experienced a profound cultural decline. Featuring the men and women who lived and worked at Grand Coulee and the native people whose lives were changed, as well as historians and engineers, this film explores how the tension between technological achievement and environmental impact hangs over the project’s legacy.

 

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
LBJ: Part Two

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE – LBJ: Part Two

 

Revisit the presidency of Lyndon B. Johnson who used his mastery of the legislative process to shepherd a collection of progressive programs. An accidental president, LBJ set out to make his mark by pushing through historic social legislation of a scale that rivaled FDR’s New Deal. But Johnson’s vision was shattered by the increasing debacle of Vietnam, and his presidency began to unravel.

 

THE ROOSEVELTS: AN INTIMATE HISTORY
The Common Cause

President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Prime Minister Winston Churchill, Casablanca 1943.

 

 

Air date: Tues., June 16, 8:00 pm

 

FDR shatters the third-term tradition, struggles to prepare a reluctant country to enter World War II and, after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, helps set the course toward Allied victory. Eleanor struggles to keep New Deal reforms alive in wartime and travels the Pacific to comfort wounded servicemen. Diagnosed with congestive heart failure in 1943 and with the war still raging, FDR resolves to conceal his condition and run for a fourth term.