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The Magic of Christmas in Alsace

The Magic of Christmas in Alsace

 

Christmas in the Alsace region of France is best experienced in the small towns and villages where each community has its own unique holiday traditions, celebrations, food, and of course wine. The Alsatian landscape is covered with medieval towns, castle ruins and vineyards that overflow with charm and history. And at Christmas, the townspeople go all out in decorating each of their towns to outdo the next in celebration of the season, and their Christmas markets are a truly magical take on this uniquely French celebration of Christmas. With Christmas being a magical time for children, the music accompaniment to this show are French carols sung by a The Maine Girls Chorus, which will delight the child in all of us.

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI
Hiker Rescue Fines

 

The number of mountain rescues statewide continues to grow every year, with rescues on Oʻahu nearly tripling over a 10-year span ending in 2016. Emergency rescue squads are often called upon to rescue people who are trespassing on public property. Should the government charge these lawbreakers for the rescue service? Join us for a conversation on proposed Hiker Rescue Fines on the next INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 

RICK STEVES’ SPECIAL
European Festivals, Part 2 of 2

RICK STEVES' EUROPE: European Festivals, Part 2 of 2

 

In this second of two episodes on Europe’s greatest festivals, we’ll dance with Spaniards at Sevilla’s April Fair, celebrate Bastille Day in Paris, run with the bulls at Pamplona, and hoist a frothy stein at Munich’s Oktoberfest. And we’ll celebrate a traditional family Christmas, browsing the holiday market in Nürnberg and sledding down alpine slopes by torchlight in Switzerland. With the entire Continent as our playground, fun is our mission.

 

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RICK STEVES’ SPECIAL
European Festivals, Part 1 of 2

RICK STEVES' SPECIAL: European Festivals, Part 1 of 2

 

In this first of two episodes on Europe’s greatest festivals, we’ll cheer with the masses at Siena’s crazy Palio horse race, toss a caber at a Scottish Highland Games, don a mask for Carnevale in Venice, and celebrate Easter in Greece. Dropping in on some of the Continent’s top parties, we discover that each one is a celebration of traditional culture, and all of them are full of opportunities to sing and dance, feast on traditional food, and party with locals.

 

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JOSEPH ROSENDO’S TRAVELSCOPE
Christmas Celebrations Around the Globe

JOSEPH ROSENDO'S TRAVELSCOPE: Christmas Celebrations Around the Globe

 

Celebrating the world through their festivals is a great way to experience a country and its people. This episode begins in Venice, California at the annual holiday boat parade — a funky and funny celebration along the Venice Canals, which highlights the offbeat, colorful spirit of this Southern California beach community. Then Joseph completes the holiday circle by returning to San Antonio, Texas’ world famous riverwalk and the Lake Geneva region of Switzerland for their Christmas celebration. In Switzerland, Joseph basks in the glow of some of the country’s best Christmas Markets, visits a Christmas ornament artist and takes a journey to old St. Nick’s village. In San Antonio, faith is real and Joseph explores the city’s spiritual roots and the real meaning of Christmas when he joins with San Antonio families in their homes to honor their heritage at the Tamalada – holiday tamale making – and in the San Fernando Cathedral at the midnight Serenada for the Virgin of Guadalupe. In this episode Joseph shows that Christmas is about more than twinkling lights and cups of cheer. In every country, in every culture — Christmas is a time to put aside differences, celebrate our humanity and join the angels in wishing each other Good Will and Peace on Earth.

 

Preview

 

 

 

A Concern About Hawaiians Leaving Hawai‘i

 

CEO Message

A Concern About Hawaiians Leaving Hawai‘i
Left image: Community Advisor Dr. Shawn Kana‘iaupuni, left. Right image: Community Advisory Chair Karen Knudsen with fellow member Les Murashige

Left image: Community Advisor Dr. Shawn Kana‘iaupuni, left. Right image: Community Advisory Chair Karen Knudsen with fellow member Les Murashige

Community Advisors pictured, from left: Cheryl Ka‘uhane Lupenui (Hawai‘i Island), Les Murashige, Dennis Bunda, Kainoa Horcajo (Maui), Marissa Sandblom (Kaua‘i) and Dr. Shawn Kana‘iaupuni. Not pictured: Chuck Boller, Lei Kihoi (Hawai‘i Island) and Corrina Moefu.

Community Advisors pictured, from left: Cheryl Ka‘uhane Lupenui (Hawai‘i Island), Les Murashige, Dennis Bunda, Kainoa Horcajo (Maui), Marissa Sandblom (Kaua‘i) and Dr. Shawn Kana‘iaupuni. Not pictured: Chuck Boller, Lei Kihoi (Hawai‘i Island) and Corrina Moefu.


Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEOBesides our statewide, governing Board of Directors, PBS Hawai‘i has a Community Advisory Board, with all of Hawai‘i’s counties represented, to give us feedback about programming and other community engagement.

 

At a recent meeting, these Community Advisors shared thoughts about the central question of our April 19 KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall: “How do we keep Hawai‘i, Hawai‘i? One theme of the discussion was concern about Native Hawaiians choosing to move out of state.

 

Dr. Shawn Kana‘iaupuni of Honolulu says there are research initiatives to measure the current outflow of Native Hawaiians. “That’s our host culture,” she noted.

 

Cheryl Ka‘uhane Lupenui of North Hawai‘i Island mentioned that community changes are affecting a school which uses a curriculum based on the Hawaiian culture. This curriculum is deemed less relevant to the needs of new students.

 

Maui’s Kainoa Horcajo said that newcomers and visitors are using social media to confer new names on treasured places, resulting in a “homogenization” of Hawai‘i.

 

All of the advisors counseled PBS Hawai‘i staff not to worry if the Town Hall turns dour. They pointed out that change is inevitable, and mindfulness is a positive first step if we want to keep Hawai‘i, Hawai‘i.

 

More to come on this subject…Aloha nui,

 

Leslie signature

 

 

PACIFIC HEARTBEAT
Ever the Land

 

This film explores the sublime bond between people and their land. For the past 150 years, the relationship between the Tūhoe Maori tribe and the New Zealand government has been defined by longstanding grievances over severe colonization experiences. The film captures a period of change in 2014, when the Tūhoe’s ancestral homelands were returned, the New Zealand government issued an official apology, and the Tūhoe built the first-ever “Living Building” in New Zealand as a testament to their values and vision of self-governance.

 

NATURE
The Sagebrush Sea

 

One of the most overlooked ecosystems on the continent consists of a massive sea of sagebrush that stretches across 11 states in the American West. This spartan yet spectacular landscape supports more than 170 species of hardscrabble birds and mammals. Among those that have adapted to survive here are birds found nowhere else: greater sage-grouse that lead remarkable lives mostly hidden in the sage. But once each year, males emerge for days on end to strut and display as prospective mates for discriminating females, which mate with only one or two of them. Females must then raise their chicks on their own, with little food, water or shelter to sustain them, while plenty of predators wait for their smallest mistake. Today, they must also contend with wells and pipelines tapping the resources buried deep below. The sagebrush and the grouse carry on, but they’re losing ground.

 

NATURE
Siberian Tiger Quest

 

Ecologist Chris Morgan has tracked large predators in some of the wildest and most remote places on earth. He now embarks on a challenge that will fulfill a lifelong dream – to find and film a Siberian tiger living wild and free in Russia’s far eastern forests. The film features the work of Korean cameraman Sooyong Park, the first individual ever to film Siberian tigers in the wild. Park spent years in the forest tracking and filming the world’s biggest cat.