obstacle

PACIFIC HEARTBEAT
Next Goal Wins

PACIFIC HEARTBEAT: Next Goal Wins

 

In 2001, American Samoa suffered a world record 31-0 defeat at the hands of Australia, garnering headlines across the world as the worst football (soccer) team on the planet. This film is an inspirational story about the power of hope in the face of seemingly insurmountable odds, and an object lesson in what it really means to be a winner in life.

 

Preview

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #903 – Young Pig Farmer

 

TOP STORY

Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu tell the story of Matthew Reyes Jr., an enterprising young pig farmer who helps his parent run Reyes’ Hog Farm in Ma‘ili. Matthew is so dedicated to his family’s business that he sacrifices any semblance of a social life. All of his waking hours are taken up by attending high school and working on the pig farm. Through this dedication, he has developed an in- depth knowledge of the pig farming business and a great sense of pride in his profession. He does want to study business once he gets to college because he feels it will give him an edge in this very competitive industry.

 

ALSO FEATURED

–Students from Waīakea High School in the Hilo district of Hawai‘i Island introduce us to a high school track star who, through the friendship and camaraderie she developed with her teammates and coaches, learned to love a sport she once dreaded.

 

–Students from Kalama Intermediate School in Makawao, Maui, feature a Hawaiian Immersion teacher who connects to her culture by painting words that express its values.

 

–Students from ‘Ilima Intermediate School in ‘Ewa, O‘ahu, tell the story of a young French horn player who learns about herself in the process of learning the music.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle introduce us to a wheelchair-bound school counselor who sees challenges not as obstacles, but as a way to grow.

 

–Students from Kaua‘i High School in Līhu‘e tell the story of young Thai immigrants who learn the value of hard work in Hawai‘i’s fast food industry.

 

–Students from Pacific Buddhist Academy present a primer on the ancient Japanese martial art of kendo.

 

This program encores Saturday, Aug. 18, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Aug. 19, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

 


BLACK AMERICA SINCE MLK: AND STILL I RISE
Out of the Shadows / Move On Up

 

Dr. Henry Louis Gates Jr. takes a personal journey through the last 50 years of African American history, charting the incredible progress made – as well as the obstacles that remain. The program features conversations with Jesse Jackson, Nas and Donna Brazile.

 

 

BLACK AMERICA SINCE MLK: AND STILL I RISE
Keep Your Head Up / Touch the Sky

 

Henry Louis Gates, Jr. explores America’s changing racial landscape-celebrating how far we have come toward equality and asking why we still have so far to go. Features conversations with Attorney General Eric Holder, activist DeRay Mckesson and television producer Shonda Rhimes.

 

 

THE STORY OF WOMEN AND ART
Parts 1 – 3

 

In this three-part series, Professor Amanda Vickery explores the story of female creativity through the ages with a fascinating art history tour from the Renaissance to the 20th century. Vickery shows how a familiarity with female artistry helps us to understand the ways societal attitudes toward women and their artistic endeavors have evolved throughout the years.

 

Part 1 of 3
Sat., April 9, 8:00 pm

 

Professor Vickery begins her journey in Florence, cradle of the Renaissance. This was a world where women’s private lives and creativity were well hidden behind closed doors. Vickery encounters intrepid art historians who, as they have discovered long-forgotten works in basements, storeroom and convents, also uncover the incredible stories of female artists who fulfilled their artistic ambitions, despite myriad social constraints placed upon them. Leaving the opulence and excess of Catholicism behind, Vickery heads north, discovering how the Protestant Reformation created a very different artistic landscape.

 

Part 2 of 3
Sat., April 9, 9:00 pm

 
Professor Vickery turns the spotlight on Britain – a new world leader in innovation, manufacturing and commerce, and France – home to the finest and most extravagant court of the 18th century. It’s a world defined by male artists like Joshua Reynolds and Thomas Gainsborough. Yet this was a world shaped, styled and designed by women. Much of the art produced by women had the status of “amateur” – a word that had yet to acquire the negative connotations it holds today.

 

Part 3 of 3
Sat., April 9, 10:00 pm

 

Professor Vickery explores the explosion of creative opportunities seized by women from the mid-19th to the mid-20th century. At a time when women were beginning to demand greater social and economic freedoms and boldly forge independent paths, female creativity would not only triumph in traditionally male-dominated artistic arenas but redefine the very notion of what art could be. One artist, in particular, forged the most unconventional of paths while using conventional mediums: Georgia O’Keefe. O’Keefe founded an artistic movement from her New Mexico retreat, proving that with courage and talent women could be recognized as world class artists.