occupation

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
War for Guam

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS: War for Guam

 

War for Guam traces the enduring legacy from World War II in Guam, a U.S. territory since 1898, and how the native people of Guam, the Chamorros, remained loyal to the U.S. under Japanese occupation, only to be later stripped of much of their ancestral lands by the American military. Through rare archival footage, contemporary film, and testimonies of survivors and their descendants, the story is told from various points of view, including from war survivors like Antonio Artero, Jr., whose father was awarded one of the first Medals of Freedom for his heroic deeds in protecting American lives; and two key historical figures, Radioman George Tweed and Father Jesus Baza Duenas.

 

Preview

 

 

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
The Prison in Twelve Landscapes

 

In the United States, there are over 2 million people in prison, up from only 300,000 40 years ago. Yet for most Americans, prisons have never felt more distant or more out of sight. A cinematic journey through a series of seemingly ordinary American landscapes, this film reveals the hidden world of the modern prison system and explores lives outside the gates affected by prisons.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
What Would It Take to Achieve Hawaiian Sovereignty?

 

In 1993, President Bill Clinton signed a law apologizing for the overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom, fueling hopes that an independent Hawaiian nation would be recognized by the federal government. Twenty-two years later, sovereignty proponents continue to push for recognition in Congress, while new pathways toward nation-building emerge at home. What might an independent Hawaiian nation look like? Daryl Huff moderates the discussion.

 

You can watch the ‘After the Show’ discussion of this program here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sGt8YjEZ8gw&feature=youtu.be