parents

Who You Gonna Call?

 

CEO Message

 

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO

It‘s time for a new three-year strategic plan for this 55-year-old nonprofit organization serving our beloved, troubled state. How does one know, in changing, uncertain times, what Hawai‘i will need most from PBS Hawai‘i? How can we best serve our viewers and fellow citizens?

 

We take very seriously the feedback we receive from our Community Advisory Board Members, who live in communities across the state and who pay attention – to their island turf and to PBS Hawai‘i’s programming.

 

In a moving discussion, full of humanity, the Board told staffers that 1) We need to keep convening diverse voices in a neutral space, because common ground and solutions are getting harder to find; 2) We need to illuminate learning about the Hawaiian culture; 3) HIKI NŌ should expand its range to provide life, school and work skills to students in grade school through college; 4) We need to keep serving young children with curriculum-rich programming, since more than half do not attend preschool.

 

PBS Hawai‘i Community Advisory Board!

 
2020 Community Advisory Board photo
 

Top row (L-R): Kaʻimi Kaupiko, Miloliʻi, Hawaiʻi Island, cultural specialist and teacher; Lei Kihoi, Kailua-Kona, Hawaiʻi Island, attorney and community activist;
Chuck Boller, Windward Oʻahu,
international film consultant;
Chair Karen Knudsen, East Honolulu,
East-West Center executive;
Kainoa Horcajo, Wailuku, Maui,
Grand Wailea Hotel cultural advisor;
Shawn Malia Kanaʻiaupuni, PhD,
Windward Oʻahu, Kamehameha Schools executive strategy consultant;
Dennis Bunda, Central Oʻahu,
Aloha Spirit Foundation executive director
Bottom row (L-R): Les Murashige,
Central Oʻahu and Līhuʻe, Kauaʻi,
retired Island Air chief executive officer; Momi Akana, Kalihi Valley, Honolulu, Keiki O KaʻĀina Family Learning Centers leader; Marissa Sandblom, Līhuʻe, Kaua‘i, Common Ground Kauaʻi chief
operations officer


Not pictured: Cheryl Kaʻuhane Lupenui, North Hawaiʻi Island, The Kohala Center president and chief executive officer

 

Family services leader Momi Akana wanted us to know that it’s not only a lack of affordability or geographical distance that keeps keiki from preschool. She said that parents who have been sexually or otherwise physically abused as children are very wary of leaving their little ones with adults they don’t know. That’s why many of these parents choose PBS KIDS to help educate their toddlers at home, Momi said. There was concerned silence as we all pondered this.

 

It’s a Board that keeps things simple and straightforward – and deep. Main thing, said advisors: “Keep Hawai‘i’s trust. It’s tough to earn, easy to lose.”

 

Aloha nui,

Leslie signature

 


PBS Hawai‘i honors the life of longtime volunteer, Matsuko Kawana. Matsuko, or as we affectionately called her, “Grandma,” passed away peacefully in February at age 101. We will remember and miss her sweet smile, her stories of growing up on O‘ahu and Maui and her hardworking and humble nature. Rest in aloha, Matsuko.

A Life Well Lived

PBS Hawaiʻi honors the life of longtime volunteer, Matsuko Kawana. Matsuko, or as we affectionately called her, “Grandma,” passed away peacefully in February at age 101. We will remember and miss her sweet smile, her stories of growing up on O‘ahu and Maui and her hardworking and humble nature. Rest in aloha, Matsuko.


 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI
Mandatory Vaccinations for Hawaiʻi School Students

 

What do parents of schoolchildren need to know about the new vaccination requirements? These new rules apply in the next school year to Hawaiʻi students heading into childcare or preschool, kindergarten, seventh grade and college. Also, any student entering school in Hawaiʻi for the first time, no matter what age, must comply. Are there exceptions? Join the conversation on Mandatory Vaccinations for Hawaiʻi School Students on INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI. You can phone in or leave us a comment on Facebook or Twitter.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 

ANIMAL BABIES: FIRST YEAR ON EARTH
New Frontiers

 

Join the baby animals as they near the end of their first year of life. It’s time for these young ones to branch off from the comfort of their mothers and learn to explore the great unknown on their own.

 

 

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
Made in Boise

 

Go inside the lives of four surrogates in Boise, Idaho and the intended parents whose children they carry. Follows the women as they navigate the rigors of pregnancy and the mixed feelings of their own families, who struggle to understand.

 

 

 

ANIMAL BABIES: FIRST YEAR ON EARTH
First Steps

 

See how the babies learn to understand their surroundings in environments ranging from Africa to Sri Lanka to Iceland. The most basic tools for survival must be learned in their first three months to thrive and ultimately survive.

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
High Cost of Child Care in Hawaiʻi

 

Caring for our keiki is pricey. A recent study says Hawai‘i families pay an average of $700 to nearly $2,000 per month for child care. And that’s if parents can find space at licensed childcare centers – where supply is far short of demand.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 


INDEPENDENT LENS
Tre Maison Dasan

INDEPENDENT LENS: Tre Maison Dasan

 

Told directly through the eyes of the children themselves, Tre Maison Dasan is a moving portrait of three unforgettable young boys struggling to grow up with a parent in prison. They face the pressure of growing up in a society that often demonizes their parents, provides little support for their families, and assumes “the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.” Society writes them off as criminals, but in their hearts their children still see them as mom and dad.

 

Preview

 

 

 

Pinkalicious & Peterrific

 

Pinkalicious & Peterrific

 

PBS Hawai‘i welcomes Pinkalicious & Peterrific to the PBS KIDS lineup!

 

Pinkalicious & Peterrific

 

Based on the best-selling book series by author-illustrator Victoria Kann, the new animated series Pinkalicious & Peterrific follows the adventures of Pinkalicious and her brother Peter. Pinkalicious imagines creative possibilities everywhere she looks, with the help from Peter and her neighborhood friends.

 

Designed for children ages 3-5, Pinkalicious & Peterrific encourages children to engage in the creative arts and self-expression, covering areas such as music, dance and visual arts.

 

Digital Resources

The Pinkalicious & Peterrific television series is part of a multiplatform media experience. Links to digital resources for kids, parents and educators are below.

 

For Kids: http://pbskids.org/pinkalicious

For Parents: http://www.pbs.org/parents/pinkalicious/home/

For Educators: https://hawaii.pbslearningmedia.org/search/?q=pinkalicious

 

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
Meet The Patels

 

Ravi Patel is almost 30 and still single, and his tradition-minded Hindu family is not happy. After he breaks up with his white girlfriend, he enters the semi-arranged marriage system in America. The film explores the influences of culture and identity on the most intense, personal, and important part of one’s life – love.

 

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