peace

DEBT OF HONOR:
Disabled Veterans in American History

 

Take an unflinching look at the reality of warfare and disability in this history of disabled veterans, featuring moving interviews with some of our country’s prominent disabled veterans, including Representative Tammy Duckworth, former Georgia Senator Max Cleland and former Commander of Fort Belvoir, Gregory Gadson.

 

NHK WORLD SPECIAL
Hatred and Forgiveness

 

On a street in Manila, during the final days of World War II, a man stands devastated, holding the dead body of his baby daughter. This man was Elpidio Quirino, who would later become President of the Philippines. In the Battle of Manila, a fierce battle between Japan and the United States which resulted in 100,000 civilian casualties, he lost his wife and three of his children. He hated the Japanese. Yet, eight years later, as President he would make a remarkable decision to grant pardons to Japanese war criminals held in the Philippines, sending them home to Japan. Why did Quirino do this against the strong wave of opposition? In a radio broadcast he explains, “I have granted pardons so that hatred against the Japanese will not remain among my descendants and the Filipino people.”

 

POV
Tea Time

 

Five Chilean women who gather monthly for a ritual that has sustained them through 60 years of personal and societal change. See how a routine of tea and pastries helped them commemorate life’s joys and cope with infidelity, illness and death.

 

The Bomb

 

This film tells the powerful story of the most destructive invention in human history, outlining how America developed the nuclear bomb, how it changed the world and how it continues to loom large in our lives. Through state-of-the-art transfer techniques that have turned recently declassified images into vivid footage, viewers witness the raw power and strangely compelling rare views of above-ground nuclear tests. The documentary includes interviews with historians Richard Rhodes, Martin Sherwin, Robert Norris, Sergei Khrushchev and others, along with men and women who helped build the weapon piece by piece. Audiences also hear from former Secretary of State George Shultz and Secretary of Defense William Perry, who reveal how the bomb was viewed inside government circles, as well as those who hold firsthand memories of seeing the first mushroom clouds fill the skies.

 

POV
Return to Homs

 

Witness the transformation of 19-year-old Basset Saroot from star goalkeeper for the Syrian national soccer team to peaceful advocate for reforms to armed insurgent. Get an inside look at the brutal war President Bashar al-Assad’s regime has waged, a conflict that many accuse the world of overlooking.

 

Caring for Mom & Dad

 

Americans are living longer than ever before, and soon older adults will outnumber the young. Today, family caregivers are providing 90 percent of parent care, in addition to balancing work and family, a job most cannot afford to do. This phenomenon is faced by millions of baby boomers who are approaching retirement themselves, and who are also grappling with the responsibilities of one or both of their parents’ care. The program explores the emotional, health and financial challenges that many caregivers face every day and offers some solutions and tips to help others embarking on this new future.

 

The Day the ‘60s Died

 

The aftermath of the shooting deaths of four college students at Kent State on May 4, 1970 has been called the most divisive moment in American history since the Civil War. This compelling documentary returns to that turbulent spring 45 years ago to take a new perspective on the incident and what followed by exploring how three very different worlds – U.S. college campuses, the jungles of Cambodia and the Nixon White House – collided during that month in 1970.

 

A Celebration of Peace Through Music

 

Concert conductor Sir Gilbert Levine leads world-class orchestral and vocal ensembles in a moving musical tribute to the 2014 canonizations of Pope John Paul II and Pope John XXIII by Pope Francis. Selections include Copland’s “Fanfare for the Common Man,” Bernstein’s “Chichester Psalms,” Verdi’s Messa Da Requiem and others. Special field pieces follow Levine as he travels to Buenos Aires, Kraków, Venice, Vienna, Rome and Washington, D.C. to show how music and spirit can unite our world.

 

Stand!
Untold Stories of the Civil Rights Movement

 

This film chronicles the key events which led to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), selecting Birmingham, Alabama as the site for the now famous ‘Project C’ (Project Confrontation) in 1963. Bringing to light often overlooked and unknown facts about the system of segregation in Birmingham, Alabama, the documentary features the brave men and women who risked all to bring about its demise.

 

1 3 4 5 6