plastic

INDEPENDENT LENS
Eating Up Easter

 

See how climate change and a booming tourism trade threaten the fragile economy of Rapa Nui, also known as Easter Island, and meet the local artists, ecologists and developers balancing their strong cultural heritage with modern-day challenges.

 

INDEPENDENT LENS: Eating Up Easter

 

 

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
Eating Up Easter

Cover story by Jody Shiroma, PBS Hawaiʻi

 

INDEPENDENT LENS film Eating Up Easter premiers Monday, May 25 at 9:00 pm

 

Rapa Nui, also known as Easter Island, is the most remote inhabited island in the Pacific Ocean. How does this island community balance its economic boom of tourism with the fragility of its indigenous culture and environment? That’s the question that native Rapanui filmmaker Sergio Mata‘u Rapu explores in the INDEPENDENT LENS film Eating Up Easter, premiering on PBS Hawai‘i on Monday, May 25 at 9:00 pm. This film, a presentation of Pacific Islanders in Communications and the Independent Television Service (ITVS) was completed in 2018, before COVID-19 travel restrictions.

 

Piru Huke, affectionately known as “Mama Piru,” was a cultural icon and community leader who mobilized coastal cleanups and motivated businesses to recycle.The catalyst for the film came in 2011 when Rapu read a news article about food security in Hawai‘i, which got him thinking about Rapa Nui, his birthplace. “As I learned more about how little food we [on Rapa Nui] grew because building cabins for tourists was more lucrative, and how much we imported contributed heavily to the buildup of trash on the island, I realized that our story was not in food security, but in the rapid development of a tiny island in the middle of the Pacific,” Rapu says.

Pictured, inset: Piru Huke, affectionately known as “Mama Piru,” was a cultural icon and community leader who mobilized coastal cleanups and motivated businesses to recycle.

A local ecologist leads recycling efforts to tackle the mounting trash arriving with tourists and the waves of plastic washing up on shore.

 

Rapu introduces four Native Islanders and the actions they are taking to preserve their culture and environment amidst rapid development. A local ecologist leads recycling efforts to tackle the mounting trash arriving with tourists and the waves of plastic washing up on shore. Two musicians struggle to build a free music school they hope will preserve cultural practices. And Rapu’s father, who was the Island’s first native Governor, attempts to balance traditions against the advantages of development while building a mini-mall to serve the local residents in the Island’s main town.

 

Engineer and musician Enrique Icka (right) works on building a sustainable cultural center and music school using recyclable materials.Engineer and musician Enrique Icka (right) works on building a sustainable cultural center and music school using recyclable materials.

 

Rapu says that while Eating up Easter is a film directed at visitors to Rapa Nui, with the intent of raising awareness of the impact and effect that they are having on the island, it also can bring up larger conversations on protecting the environment for current and future generations.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 11|7|19:
A Second Chance and other stories

 

TOP STORY

“A Second Chance”
Students from Waiākea High School in the Hilo district of Hawaiʻi
Island tell the story of Easten Tanimoto, a young man who, under the influence of psilocybin (hallucinogenic mushrooms), climbed a telephone pole, was electrocuted, then fell to the ground, sustaining serious injuries and severe burns. After a miraculous recovery, Tanimoto has dedicated his life to speaking at schools and inspiring students to make better life choices.

 

ALSO FEATURED

“Veterans Mural”
Students from Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of a mural artist who forges a special connection with the war veterans from his community.

 

“Baseball Dad”
Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on the Garden Isle tell the story of a Kauaʻi man who raised two sons that became major league baseball players.

 

“Plastic Pollution”
Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului tell the story of Maui volunteers who are working to reduce plastic pollution in our oceans and on our beaches.

 

“Recycled Plastic Hale”
Students from Island School on Kauaʻi tell the story of the first building in the state to be built with blocks made of plastic waste.

 

“How to Make a Parol”
Students from Kalākaua Middle School on Oʻahu show us how to make a traditional Filipino Christmas decoration.

 

“Kapa Maker”
Students at Kalama Intermediate School on Maui introduce us to a master practitioner of a traditional Hawaiian form of textile-making.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students from Molokaʻi High School.

 

 

 

PBS NEWSHOUR PRESENTS
The Plastic Problem

 

By 2050, there will be more plastic than fish in the oceans. PBS NewsHour takes a closer look at this now ubiquitous material, how it’s impacting the world and ways we can break our plastic addiction.

 

 

 

ALL THINGS BAKELITE
The Age of Plastic

 

All Things Bakelite: The Age of Plastic is a joyous and provocative one-hour documentary that captures both the wonder and the curse of chemist Leo Hendrik Baekeland’s biggest invention – the first wholly synthetic plastic. One of the greatest stories of science never told comes alive using re-enactments; rare archival footage and personal diaries; interviews with scientists, historians, and artists; and a highly entertaining original score. Its lively pace and quirky style appeals to anyone interested in the human drama that underlies history, science, business, and design. The film’s 2019 release on public television stations coincides with the 110th anniversary year of the Bakelite patent.

 

ALL THINGS BAKELITE: The Age of Plastic

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Return of the ʻAlalā

 

TOP STORY

 

“Return of the ʻAlalā”
Students from Kua O Ka Lā Miloliʻi Hipuʻu Virtual Academy Public Charter School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of efforts to save an almost extinct bird: the ʻalalā, or Hawaiian Crow, a native species endemic to the forests of Hawaiʻi Island. As of 2002, there were no ʻalalā left in the wild. Thanks to a program spearheaded by the Keauhou Bird Conservation Center in Volcano, ʻalalā were bred in captivity and released into the wild in 2016. The release was not successful and the birds did not survive. But since 2018, a new set of birds released by the center are demonstrating signs of survival and have even split into breeding pairs, a major milestone in the recovery of a lost species.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

–Students from Aliamanu Middle School on Oʻahu follow administration and staff members at their school who have taken on the challenge of getting fit through walking.

 

–Students from Seabury Hall Middle School on Maui find out how some brand-new drivers are learning to take responsibility behind the wheel.

 

–Students from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui tell the story of a high school track star who was inspired to excel by his father’s courage during a life-threatening illness.

 

–Students from Waiʻanae High School in West Oʻahu tell the story of young tattoo artist who is discovering his identity as a Hawaiian by “making his mark.”

 

Plus, a public service announcement from students at Saint Francis School on Oʻahu on the importance of eliminating plastic straws.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students from Kalani High School in East Oʻahu.

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Plastic Waste

 

We love the convenience of plastic, but our to-go containers and other common items may end up as unsightly litter along roadsides and find their way into streams, ending up in the ocean where the plastic injures or kills marine life. Is there too much reliance on plastic products or are we just not responsible with the products we use? Is there a solution to our plastic waste problem?

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Will the Plastic Bag Ban Work on Oahu?

 

On July 1st, Honolulu will become the last county in the state to enforce a ban on certain types of plastic bags. The law addresses concerns by environmentalists who maintain that plastic bags clutter and damage our land and ocean. But, some island businesses say the law may hurt more than it helps, as they consider raising prices to pay for more expensive, acceptable bags. Moderator Daryl Huff hosts a conversation with supporters and opponents of the law as they discuss the pros and cons of the plastic bag ban on Oahu.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I is a live public affairs show that is also live streamed on PBSHawaii.org. Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email, or Twitter. You may also email your questions ahead of time toinsights@pbshawaii.org.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

TWICE BORN
Stories from the Special Delivery Unit Part 3 of 3

 

Witness groundbreaking fetal surgery in this miniseries that takes an intimate, inside look at the Special Delivery Unit at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, where rare surgeries are performed on babies inside the womb. With exclusive access to the elite unit, experience rarely seen, real-time footage of operations on fetuses. Join expectant parents who face a gut-wrenching decision: Should they take a leap of faith to repair birth defects with pre-natal surgery, even if it means they could lose their child? Gain insight into the lives of an unusual team of doctors who have defied skeptics and chosen to pursue this high-risk, high-reward career path.

 

Part 3 of 3
See Lilly’s plastic surgery procedure and Bobby and Shelly’s delivery of their baby girl, Luelle. Geneva and Reggie visit CHOP to seek help for their unborn child, who has developed a lower urinary tract obstruction.

 

1 2