president

WASHINGTON WEEK

WASHINGTON WEEK

 

For more than 45 years, Washington Week has been the most intelligent and up to date conversation about the the most important news stories of the week. Washington Week is the longest-running primetime news & public affairs program on television and features a group of journalists participating in roundtable discussions of major news events. Online at pbs.org/washingtonweek or on Twitter @washingtonweek.

 

 

 

PBS NEWSHOUR SPECIAL COVERAGE:
The Impeachment Hearings

 

Here are the ways that you can view the Impeachment Hearings coverage, with expert analysis from the PBS NewsHour team:

 

Wednesday, November 13, Watch Online Now
Friday, November 15, from 4:00 am Hawaiʻi time until conclusion

 

LIVE Viewing
Over-the-Air channel 11.1
Spectrum channel 10/ HD channel 1010
Hawaiian Telcom channel 11/HD channel 1011
DirecTV channel 11
Dish channel 11

 

The hearings are also available via livestream for free on PBS.org and the PBS app (ios, Android, Roku, Apple TV, Android TV, Amazon Fire TV, Chromecast and smart TVs), as well as Facebook, YouTube and Twitter.

 

After the live telecast, the hearings will be available for viewing on-demand, for free, across digital platforms, including PBS.org and the PBS video app, as well as Facebook, YouTube and Twitter.

 

Each evening, PBS NewsHour at 6:30 pm and Amanpour and Company at 11:00 pm will also provide extensive coverage of the hearings.

 

***PBS Kids programming during the live Impeachment Hearings coverage is available on Spectrum channel 443, Hawaiian Telcom channel 96, over-the-air, Dish and DirecTV channel 11.3, and on PBSHawaii.org***

 

 

 

 

Patricia de Stacy Harrison, a National Public Media Leader, Visits Hawaiʻi

 

CEO Message

 

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO

Patricia de Stacy Harrison loved growing up in her working-class, family-centered neighborhood in Brooklyn – it was loud and caring, engaged and opinionated. “You would talk,” she told me in her visit to Honolulu last month. “And then you would wait for your next turn to talk.”

 

That’s one piece of her beloved Brooklyn culture she needed to un-learn in adult life. She became a very good listener – as demonstrated in a successful Washington, D.C. public relations business that she and her husband owned and operated; as a diplomat serving under then-Secretary of State Colin Powell; and for almost 15 years as President and CEO of the private nonprofit Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

 

(Left) Getting ready for GET CAUGHT READING, PBS Hawaiʻi’s new read-aloud program. Her book? A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. (Right) With Miriam Hellreich, a Board Member of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and Hawai‘i resident; Leslie; and PBS Hawaiʻi’s Board Chair Joanne Lo Grimes

Getting ready for GET CAUGHT READING, PBS Hawai‘i’s new read-aloud program. Her book? A Tree Grows in BrooklynWith Miriam Hellreich, a Board Member of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and Hawaiʻi resident; Leslie; and PBS Hawaiʻi’s Board Chair Joanne Lo Grimes

 

She was in the Islands to tour and talk with PBS Hawaiʻi, Hawaiʻi Public Radio and Pacific Islanders in Communications. She also spoke at the East-West Center, and in Kona, Hawaiʻi Island, at the Hawaiʻi Executive Conference.

 

“‘Steward’ is a very old-fashioned word but an important one because it speaks to accountability.”

Pat Harrison
President and CEO, Corporation for Public Broadcasting

 

Her job is not easy to explain. A top leader in public media, Ms. Harrison doesn’t create or distribute media. What she does is steward the federal investment in public media for PBS and NPR stations and similar nonprofit organizations across the country. The goal is to open doors of learning and opportunity. The funds generally amount to about 15 percent of a public media station’s revenues.

 

“‘Steward’ is a very old-fashioned word but an important one because it speaks to accountability. And CPB is accountable to Congress and the American people,” she said.

 

(Left) Updating the PBS Hawaiʻi Board on national initiatives. (Right) Taking the podium with East-West Center chief executive Richard Vuylsteke.

Updating the PBS Hawai‘i Board
on national initiatives
Taking the podium with East-West Center
chief executive Richard Vuylsteke

 

The core pillars of public media are education and journalism – or as Ms. Harrison is quick to specify in these roiling times in reporting, “fact-based journalism.” The so-called “Three Ds” shape the Corporation’s funding choices: Digital innovation and acceleration; Diversity of stories, talent and perspectives; and Dialogue within communities and country.

 

Under Ms. Harrison’s leadership in 2010, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting provided vital seed money for a public media start-up far from Washington, D.C. It was PBS Hawaiʻi’s own HIKI NŌ vision of convening student voices! Since then, private donors have championed HIKI NŌ, and students across the state meet PBS journalism standards and excel at national digital media competitions. The program has become a pathway to Early College.

 

Ms. Harrison looks for ways to adapt and bring about positive change.

 

She recalls something that Sir Howard Stringer, then head of Sony, said to her:

 

“We all have to remember not to hang on to the status quo long after the quo has lost its status.”

 

Says Ms. Harrison: “I have been afraid of the dreaded status quo ever since.”

 

 

 

 

FRONTLINE
On the President’s Orders

 

The story of President Duterte’s campaign against drug dealers and addicts in the Philippines. Told with unprecedented and intimate access to both sides of the bloody war – the Manila police and an ordinary family from the slums.

 

 

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Proof of Loyalty: Kazuo Yamane and the Nisei Soldiers of Hawai‘i

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS - Proof of Loyalty: Kazuo Yamane and the Nisei Soldiers of Hawai‘i

 

Kazuo Yamane, a Nisei Japanese American from Hawai‘i, played a crucial strategic role in WWII. Drafted just before the war, Yamane became a part of the 100th Infantry Battalion. He was plucked from their ranks for his exceptional knowledge of the Japanese language, which would lead him to the Pentagon and to Europe, where he served under President Eisenhower. Yamane would eventually use his language skills to help shorten the war in the Pacific.

 

Preview

 

 

 

Bank of Hawaii Foundation Renews Major Support for PBS Hawaiʻi’s HIKI NŌ

PBS HAWAI‘I – News Release

315 Sand Island Access Rd.| p: 808.462.5000| pbshawaii.org
Honolulu, HI 96819-2295| f: 808.462.5090

 

For questions regarding this press release, contact:
Jody Shiroma
jshiroma@pbshawaii.org
808.462.5026­

 

May 14, 2019

 

Download this Press Release

 

Bank of Hawaii Foundation major supporter of HIKI NŌ

(HONOLULU, HI) –– Bank of Hawaii Foundation has renewed its major support of PBS Hawaiʻiʻs youth learning initiative:  HIKI NŌ: The Nation’s First Statewide Student News Network, with a $100,000 grant. Bank of Hawaii Foundation’s investment dates back to the launch of HIKI NŌ in 2011.

 

Since then, Hawaii’s HIKI NŌ schools have gained the reputation of being formidable competitors at rigorous national journalism contests, including bringing home nearly 20% of the awards at the prestigious Student Television Network Convention held March 28-31 in Seattle, Washington and which involved over 3,000 students and teachers.

 

“Bank of Hawaii Foundation is honored to be a significant contributor to HIKI NŌ since inception,” said Momi Akimseu, president of Bank of Hawaii Foundation. “Our ongoing commitment helps local students across the islands continue the meaningful work of sharing their unique voices and perspectives in a very powerful way. We are proud to support a program of this caliber, which provides students the opportunity to develop digital storytelling skills and the means to connect their relevant stories and experience with our local community.”

 

PBS Hawaiʻi President and CEO Leslie Wilcox said the Foundation’s belief in Hawaiʻi’s youth is fueling a statewide “launch pad” for student achievement in real-world life skills such as perseverance, critical thinking, oral and written communications, teamwork and technology.

 

Under their teachers’ guidance, middle and high school students from more than 90 public, private and charter schools from across the islands use digital media to report from their communities.

 

Bank of Hawaii Foundation is HIKI NŌ’s trailblazing lead sponsor, with other major sponsors Kamehameha Schools and ABC Stores.

 

HIKI NŌ airs on PBS Hawaiʻi at 7:30 pm Thursdays, and is rebroadcast at 3:00 pm on Sundays. The student newscasts are always available to view on demand at www.pbshawaii.org.

 

 

 

NORMAN MINETA AND HIS LEGACY:
AN AMERICAN STORY

NORMAN MINETA AND HIS LEGACY: AN AMERICAN STORY

 

The child of immigrants, Norman Mineta’s uniquely American story charts a path from the shame he experienced as a Japanese American inside a U.S. internment camp during World War II to his triumphant rise to political prominence that has shaped every level of government, and made him one of the most influential Asian Americans in the history of our nation. His distinguished career has been a continuous unmatched slate of firsts, including 20 years in the United States Congress and eventually serving in the cabinets of two presidents from different political parties: Bill Clinton and George W. Bush. Still thriving today in his 80s, he is celebrated as a bipartisan visionary who preached political civility, yet was a bold change-maker with a deft political touch and an inclusive vision of the future.

 

Preview

 

 

 

PBS NEWSHOUR: The State of the Union Address

PBS NEWSHOUR: State of the Union Address

 

The PBS NewsHour continues to provide in-depth analysis of current events with a news summary, live interviews and discussions of domestic and international issues.

 

Live Stream

 

The PBS NewsHour’s mission — to provide viewers with intelligent, balanced, in-depth reporting and analysis of the most important domestic and international issues of the day — is even more critical today than when the broadcast began more than 40 years ago. The NewsHour team ensures audiences come away with a better understanding of the issues at hand allowing them to draw the most informed conclusions.

 

 

 

PBS NEWSHOUR
Election Night Coverage 2018

 

PBS NewsHour will present live coverage of the 2018 Midterm Elections on Tuesday, November 6, 2018 starting at 3pm HST. This special broadcast will be anchored by managing editor Judy Woodruff, with a panel of studio guests to include syndicated columnist Mark Shields, New York Times columnist David Brooks, Cook Political Report national editor Amy Walter, editor and publisher of American Greatness Chris Buskirk, MoveOn.org senior adviser Karine Jean-Pierre, and PBS NewsHour Capitol Hill correspondent Lisa Desjardins.

 

PBS NEWSHOUR SPECIAL ELECTION DAY REPORT 2018. Host Judy Woodruff

 

Joining NewsHour’s coverage remotely will be PBS NewsHour White House correspondent Yamiche Alcindor at the White House; presidential historian Michael Beschloss; former DHS official Juliette Kayyem; Wilson Center Kennan Institute global fellow Nina Jankowicz; PBS NewsHour Weekend special correspondent Jeff Greenfield; and PBS NewsHour correspondents Amna Nawaz, William Brangham, Jeffrey Brown, and John Yang in the field and in Washington.

 

The special will also include reporting throughout the night on local and state elections in coordination with local PBS and NPR stations.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 906 – 2017 HIKI NŌ Fall Challenge

 

This episode features stories from the 2017 HIKI NŌ Fall Challenge. In September of 2017, five high schools and nine middle schools participated in a challenge in which teams had exactly four days to conceptualize, shoot, write, and edit a HIKI NŌ story based on a specific theme. No work could be done on the stories prior to the production window because the theme was not revealed until the start of the four-day sprint. The theme of this challenge was “What it’s Like to Walk in Another Person’s Shoes.” No teachers, or adults of any kind, could provide hands-on assistance. It was all up to the students.

 

TOP STORIES
Included in this episode are the winners of the Middle School and High School Divisions of the 2017 HIKI NŌ Fall Challenge. The Middle School winners were from ‘Ewa Makai Middle School in the ‘Ewa district of O‘ahu. Their story “Lolita” features a drag queen in his early 20s who explains how taking on his drag persona of Lolita gives him confidence and helps him cope with a sometimes difficult life. The winning High School story, “Hurricane Harvey Relief,” was created by students at Kalaheo High School in Windward O‘ahu. It follows a group of volunteers who put themselves in the shoes of Houston’s Hurricane Harvey victims and helped to collect goods toward the relief effort.

 

ALSO FEATURED
–Students from Maui High School created a story about what it’s like to walk in the shoes of a teen transitioning to a new gender.

 

–Students from Kapa‘a High School on Kaua‘i featured the school band president who is successful at what he does because he tries to walk in the shoes of his fellow musicians.

 

–Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu stress the importance of empathy in dealing with people who suffer from a very painful condition known as Fibromyalgia.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle show us that walking in the shoes of someone who moved to Hawaiʻi for a better life helps us to better appreciate our island home.

 

–Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i help us to consider what it’s like being a teenager who is prone to suicide.

 

–Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului tell the story of a cobbler who creates custom shoes for people who can’t wear conventional footwear.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 8, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 9, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

 

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