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Fact-Based Reporting, Without Fear or Favor

 

CEO Message

Fact-Based Reporting, Without Fear or Favor

 

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEOI first took note of war correspondent Christiane Amanpour back in the early 1990s when I saw her on cable channel CNN, running across a crowded street in Bosnia with sniper fire ringing out.

 

It wasn’t only her risk-taking that arrested me; it was her unflinching reports on a different kind of war. This wasn’t an army versus an army. It was a war against civilians.

 

More than two decades later, she would say: “I learned…when I was covering genocide and ethnic cleansing in Bosnia, never to equate victim and aggressor, never to create a false moral or factual equivalence.”

 

“When lies become mixed up with the truth, it’s a very dangerous world.” – Christiane Amanpour“Because then, if you do, particularly in situations like that,” she said, “you are party and accomplice to the most unspeakable crimes and consequences.”

 

“So,” she concluded, “I believe in being truthful, not neutral.”

 

Amanpour, who is now CNN’s Chief International Correspondent, interviews global leaders and decision-makers on PBS every weeknight at 11:00. Her program, Amanpour on PBS, joined the programming line-up after PBS stopped distributing programs with Charlie Rose, following multiple women’s allegations of sexual harassment.

 

Amanpour, who turns 59 this month, is a British citizen who spent her early years in Tehran. She is the product of a Muslim father from Iran and a Christian mother from England – and she’s married to a Jewish American, former U.S. diplomat Jamie Rubin. They live in London with their teenage son, Darius.

 

“I’ve lived in a completely multi-cultural, multi-ethnic, multi-religious environment, in some of the most difficult places in the world,” Amanpour has said.

 

“I’ve seen firsthand that you can bridge differences, you can have tolerance between groups. The trick is to minimize the extremes, whether it’s in politics or in religion or in any kind of relationship, and to stick to the sensible center, which is where the vast majority, not only of this country but the world, lies,” she says.

 

Amanpour also has a knack for bridging between television networks and countries. She will remain with CNN in Britain while sharing her interviews with PBS in America.

 

She urges all journalists to re-commit to robust, fact-based reporting on the issues – without fear and without favor.

 

“When lies become mixed up with the truth,” she said, “it’s a very dangerous world.”

 

Almost three decades after Christiane dodged bullets in the Balkans, she’s sitting down in the studio with world power players. I still find her coverage arresting. And the truth is worth staying up for. See you at 11:00 weeknights, “Amanpour on PBS.”

 

Aloha nui,

 

Leslie signature

PBS Hawaiʻi to Add New Program Featuring Journalist Christiane Amanpour

PBS HAWAI‘I – News Release

315 Sand Island Access Rd.| p: 808.462.5000| pbshawaii.org
Honolulu, HI 96819-2295| f: 808.462.5090

 

For questions regarding this press release, contact:
Emily Bodfish
ebodfish@pbshawaii.org
808.462.5031­

 

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Christiane Amanpour on PBSHONOLULU, HI – PBS Hawai’i will add a new global affairs interview program to its broadcast schedule, featuring acclaimed journalist and war correspondent Christiane Amanpour, starting Monday, December 11, at 11 pm.

 

The half-hour program, Amanpour on PBS, will run on weeknights.  This follows PBS’ decision to terminate distribution of programs with interviewer Charlie Rose, who was accused by multiple women of sexual harassment.

 

The PBS national organization announced it will distribute this CNN International program on an interim basis, and is finalizing plans for a second public affairs program to air at 11:30 pm.

 

PBS President and CEO Paula Kerger says Amanpour on PBS features conversations with international leaders and decision-makers, and “adds to the long tradition of public affairs programming that has been a hallmark of public media for decades.”

 

Amanpour, who is CNN’s Chief International Correspondent, has earned every major television journalism award, including 11 news and documentary Emmy Awards, four Peabody Awards, two George  Awards, three duPont-Columbia Awards and the Courage in Journalism Award.

 

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PBS Hawai‘i is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization and Hawai‘i’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i to the world. pbshawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
The News Stories and Events of 2017

 

For our last live discussion of 2017, INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I reviews the major news stories of the last year, from investigative to inspirational and more. Our guests will also explore outstanding examples of “truth to power” stories, and will offer their suggestions on the stories to watch for in 2018.

 

Our scheduled guests include INSIGHTS moderators Yunji De Nies and Daryl Huff, and Ka Leo O Hawai‘i Editor-in-Chief Spencer Oshita. A HIKI NŌ student journalist will also be participating. Beth-Ann Kozlovich is scheduled to moderate this discussion.

 

An encore of this program will air on Thursday, December 21 at 8:00 pm. INSIGHTS will be on hiatus until Thursday, January 11.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

PBS NEWSHOUR
Presidential Address

 

President Donald Trump will deliver a televised address Monday on how the U.S. will proceed in the nation’s 16-year war in Afghanistan.

 

Trump met with his national security team, including Defense Secretary James Mattis, on Friday at Camp David, Maryland, to discuss military strategy in Afghanistan. The president took to Twitter on Saturday to say that the talks with military leaders led to “many decisions made, including on Afghanistan.” The president did not offer any clues into the agreed-upon strategy, but several media outlets have indicated that Trump may announce continued U.S. presence in the country.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
What Happens to Hawai‘i Elders Who Don’t Have a Personal Safety Net?

 


Whether it’s job loss, illness, divorce or other life circumstances, some islanders find themselves at wit’s end, running out of money in retirement. What options do they have? And how are Hawai‘i taxpayers affected? What happens to Hawai‘i elders who don’t have a personal safety net?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
Murder of a President

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: Murder of a President

 

Explore the life of James Garfield (1831-1891), the nation’s 20th president. Trace his unprecedented rise to power, his shooting and its bizarre and tragic aftermath. Based on the best-seller Destiny of the Republic, the story follows the life of one of the most extraordinary men ever elected president.

 

Friends of Jimmy Borges establish UH music scholarship in his name

Press Release Header

 

HONOLULU, HI – Friends of local jazz vocalist Jimmy Borges have raised more than $300,000 for a vocal music scholarship fund bearing his name at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. The needs-based scholarship will benefit Hawaii high school graduates.

 

Borges, 80, is battling cancer.

 

Friends of Jimmy Borges establish UH music scholarship in his name

 

Borges is thrilled with this legacy fund and wants the vocal music scholarship to encourage Hawaii teens to pursue their dreams, just as he has done during his successful 60-year music career. “There’s no such thing as a stop sign,” Borges said. “Just speed bumps.”

 

A team of the entertainer’s friends raised the scholarship money in less than a month:

 

• Robert Clarke, a cancer survivor and retired chief of Hawaiian Electric Industries (HEI)
• Walter A. Dods Jr., Matson Chairman and retired First Hawaiian Bank CEO and Chairman
• Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawaii President and CEO

 

Contributions are still being accepted by Malia Peters at the UH Foundation: malia.peters@uhfoundation.org

 

About 50 scholarship donors were treated to a special concert by Borges last week at PBS Hawaii. The singer candidly explained his situation: a recurrence of cancer has migrated from his liver to his lungs. He does not expect to survive.

 

The footage will be used in an upcoming TV presentation, Jimmy Borges: Faced It All, scheduled to premiere at 8:00 pm on Thursday, January 21 on PBS Hawaii.

 

Download this Press Release

 

Contact: Liberty Peralta
Email: lperalta@pbshawaii.org
Phone: 808.973.1383

 

PBS Hawaii is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Hawaii’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawaii and Hawaii to the world. PBSHawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
What Should We Do with Hawai‘i’s Drug Offenders?


In Hawai‘i, a drug conviction can lead to jail time, especially when the drug is crystal
methamphetamine, the state’s top drug threat. Mandatory minimum prison sentences are
meant to deter trafficking, sale and use of crystal meth, but critics say drug treatment
might be a more effective and less expensive option than lock-up for non-violent offenders.
What should we do with Hawaii’s illegal drug offenders?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
How Can People Displaced by U.S. Nuclear Tests Prosper in Hawai‘i?

 

An estimated 12,000 people have come to Hawai‘i in search of a better life, primarily from the Marshall Islands and Chuuk, which were affected by U.S. nuclear tests. Many find themselves on government aid or living in homeless encampments on Oahu. How can people displaced by U.S. nuclear tests prosper in Hawai‘i?

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I will air at a special time, 9:00 pm, immediately following PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS The Land of Eb, a fictional film about the head of a Marshallese family, who is struggling to sustain his family in Hawai‘i. Mahealani Richardson hosts the conversation.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
What Are the Challenges Facing People with Disabilities?


July marked the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, or ADA. The legislation prohibits discrimination and ensures equal opportunity for persons with disabilities in employment, State and local government services, public accommodations, commercial facilities and transportation. But many advocates say more work is needed to improve the lives of Hawai‘i residents with physical disabilities. What are the challenges facing people with physical disabilities? Daryl Huff hosts the discussion

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

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