price

FAKE OR FORTUNE?
Toulouse-Lautrec

FAKE OR FORTUNE? Toulouse-Lautrec

 

The team investigates four sketchbooks which may be the work of the young French master. Alain Brun is a French psychoanalyst who lives in Bordeaux. He was given the sketchbooks by his grandmother in the 1960s and she always maintained they were the work of Toulouse Lautrec. Alain sent them to the Lautrec committee to see if they could be authenticated. They came back saying that it was actually the work of Lautrec’s tutor, Princeteau. However, Princeteau experts have disputed this – saying they are far too good. The team searches for evidence to see if they can irrefutably link these sketches to the young Lautrec and change the committee’s mind.

 

 

 

FAKE OR FORTUNE?
Giacometti

FAKE OR FORTUNE? Giacometti

 

Twentieth-century sculptures are hot property in the art market. Alberto Giacometti’s Pointing Man figure sold for $141m at auction in New York in 2015, making it the most expensive sculpture ever sold. Could a stark, white square of plaster that has been passed down through an English family with art world connections be one of Giacometti’s earliest and most daring works?

 

 

 

FAKE OR FORTUNE?
A Double Whodunnit

FAKE OR FORTUNE? A Double Whodunnit

 

Fiona Bruce and Philip Mould investigate two rare portraits of black British subjects from the 18th and 19th centuries. Painted with extraordinary skill and sophistication, both pieces of art are highly unusual in their positive depiction of black sitters at a time when Britain was still heavily engaged in slavery. But this is also an intriguing double whodunnit. Who are the artists who broke with the conventions of the time to paint these exceptional works?

 

 

 

FAKE OR FORTUNE?
Nicholson

 

In 2006 Lyn Fuss bought a still life Glass Jug with Pears on Plates by celebrated British artist William Nicholson. William may have been overshadowed by his more famous son Ben Nicholson, but William’s paintings are very collectable and fetch high prices. Lyn paid £165,000 for her Nicholson. Then in 2011 Lyn was told her picture wouldn’t appear in the official catalogue raisonne of Nicholson’s work. The implication is it’s a fake and, as such, is worth next to nothing. Could there have been a mistake? This is a very personal journey for Lyn since she bought the painting from the gallery of her deceased aunt, who was an authority on Nicholson and wrote the previous catalogue raisonne. The team tries to establish if this is a genuine Nicholson. Lyn not only wants to establish if she has lost the 165, 000 investment but also hopes it’s a chance to clear her aunt’s name.

 

FAKE OR FORTUNE? Nicholson

 

 

 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW
Vintage Madison

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW Vintage Madison

 

Journey back 15 years and learn how fantastic finds from Madison, WI, have fared in today’s market. Highlights include an 1875 Norwegian Hardanger fiddle, Winsor McCay comic art and an Eanger Irving Couse oil. See which item doubled in value to $80,000-$100,000.

 

 

 

FRONTLINE
Marcos Doesn’t Live Here Anymore

FRONTLINE: Marcos Doesn’t Live Here Anymore

 

Marcos Doesn’t Live Here Anymore examines the US immigration system through the eyes of two unforgettable protagonists whose lives reveal the human cost of deportation.

 

Preview

 

 

 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW
Cleveland, OH, Part 2 of 3

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW: Cleveland, OH, Part 2 of 3

 

Journey to Cleveland and learn about items such as an Ohio salt-glazed figural stoneware match stand, an 1863 Civil War grave marker group and a 1964 Manoucher Yektai oil painting. Which find is valued at $65,000?

 

 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW
Omaha, NE, Part 3 of 3

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW: Omaha, NE, Part 3 of 3

 

Travel to Omaha to see fantastic pieces of history, like a homeopathic medicine cabinet, a 1939 Gregoire Boonzaier oil painting and a mid-19th-century Mormon book archive. Which treasure is the top find of the hour?

 

&nbsp

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW
Cleveland, OH, Part 1 of 3

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW: Cleveland, OH, Part 1 of 3

 

Discover hidden treasures in Cleveland, such as 1920 World Series ticket stubs, a Charles Rohlfs music stand from around 1905 and an Ohio folk art portrait, ca. 1838.

 

 

1 2 3