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What’s it Going to Take?
An executive forum on making life better in Hawaiʻi

What's it Going to Take? - An executive forum on making life better in Hawaiʻi

What's it Going to Take statistics: • Almost half of Hawaiʻi residents are barely making ends meet. • 6 out of 10 jobs pay less than a living wage. • 3 out of 4 people earning low wages still need housing. Source: Hawaiʻi Community Foundation

LIVE Thursday, October 24, 8:00-10:00 pm

 

Something different is happening.

 

Top senior Hawaiʻi executives are joining forces to help solve longstanding
community issues that are holding Hawaiʻi back.

Scheduled to appear:

 

• Duane Kurisu, aio Founder, Hawaiʻi Executive Conference Chairman
• Catherine Ngo, President and CEO, Central Pacific Bank
• Bob Harrison, Chairman and CEO, First Hawaiian Bank
• Rich Wacker, President and CEO, American Savings Bank
• Micah Kāne, CEO and President, Hawaiʻi Community Foundation
• Colbert Matsumoto, Chairman, Tradewind Capital Group
• Jack Wong, CEO, Kamehameha Schools
• Elliot Mills, Vice President and General Manager, Aulani, Disney Resort and Spa
• Robert Nobriga, President, Island Holdings
• Kamanaʻo Crabbe, Former CEO, Office of Hawaiian Affairs
• Ann Botticelli, Senior Vice President Communications and Public Affairs, Hawaiian Airlines

These executives are using detailed data* commissioned by the
Hawaiʻi Community Foundation and combining their problem-solving
experiences and influence to engage other sectors in a collaborative
resolve to make life in Hawaiʻi better.

 

Click the link to learn more about the Change Framework: https://www.hawaiicommunityfoundation.org/join-the-movement

 

Join host Leslie Wilcox for an unprecedented public conversation with top Hawaiʻi executives who are armed with detailed information and influence to marshal answers to deep-seated community problems.

 

 


 

Scheduled to appear at this live event:

 

Duane Kurisu
aio Founder
Hawai‘i Executive Conference
  Chairman

Catherine Ngo
President and CEO
Central Pacific Bank

Bob Harrison
Chairman and CEO
First Hawaiian Bank


Rich Wacker
President and CEO
American Savings Bank

Micah Kāne
CEO and President
Hawai‘i Community Foundation

Colbert Matsumoto
Chairman
Tradewind Capital Group

Jack Wong
CEO
Kamehameha Schools

Elliott Mills
Vice President and
  General Manager
Aulani, Disney Resort and Spa

Robert Nobriga
President
Island Holdings

Kamana‘o Crabbe
Former CEO,
  Office of Hawaiian Affairs

Ann Botticelli
Senior Vice President
  Communications and Public Affairs
Hawaiian Airlines

 


 

Encore broadcasts of this program will air:
 
Sunday, October 27, 1 pm – 3 pm
 
Saturday, November 2, 8 pm – 10 pm
 



The Ultimate Real Estate in a Democracy: Common Ground

 

CEO Message

 

The Ultimate Real Estate in a Democracy: Common Ground

 

KĀKOU – Hawai‘i's Town Hall

 

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEOAs Hawai‘i real estate keeps getting pricier, I keep thinking of a different kind of real estate that is ultimately more valuable in a democracy.

 

Common ground in our national and local discourse: Priceless.

 

These are days when people don’t just disagree on issues; they have different sets of facts. And there’s a media voice catering to every opinion, affirming what one already believes, whether it’s true or not.

 

We all have reason to worry about our democracy, since its health depends upon shared core values, a level of trust in our leaders, and the reliability of information on which to act.

 

Hawai‘i is by no means seeing the kind of partisan polarization that is gripping the Continent, but we’re struggling to get our arms around and agree upon big issues, such as what to do about homelessness and how to support jobs with increasing automation in the workforce.

 

PBS Hawai‘i brings together Islanders with differing perspectives to engage directly with each other on many top-of-mind subjects and some issues that aren’t considered enough. Real democracies require real discussion.

 

This is not the same as what local daily broadcast news operations do – they generally try to tape separate interviews with the parties, and air the contained sound bites in a two-minute story in the newscast. (It’s not easy to convene people who disagree with each other, especially on short notice.)

 

On our weekly hour-long Insights on PBS Hawai‘i and our periodic two-hour KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall, people on different sides of issues meet face to face – and they’re being televised and streamed live. They show up, because they want to get their message across; because it’s the responsible, responsive thing to do; and because they trust us to treat them fairly. Once in a great while, when an issue is particularly volatile, we’re unable to get pro and con leaders to sit down together. And also infrequently, we end up with a lackluster program because we can’t get participants to depart from canned comments, to have a real conversation.

 

But most times, participants put aside any discomfort they may feel about engaging directly with opponents or critics and answering follow-up questions from our moderator. The best of these participants truly listen, instead of trying to cut short their opponents or simply waiting for their turn to speak. This leads to candid, meaningful exchanges that help viewers develop their own perspectives.

 

With today’s complicated societal challenges keeping us at odds and on hold, our mired democracy seriously needs this kind of civil discourse.

 

When you contribute your hard-earned dollars to PBS Hawai‘i, you are supporting the power of media for public service over profit and politics. And you’re supporting priceless common ground for the common good. Thank you!

 

Aloha nui,

Leslie signature