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What’s it Going to Take?

What's it Going to Take? An executive forum on making life better in Hawaiʻi

What’s it Going to Take? Executive forum

What's it Going to Take? An executive forum on making life better in Hawaiʻi

 

COLLEGE BEHIND BARS
Parts One and Two

 

Meet the incarcerated men and women admitted to the rigorous Bard Prison Initiative (BPI). Some students make great strides academically, only to discover BPI keeps raising the bar. Being sent to solitary puts an education in jeopardy.

 

 

 

COLLEGE BEHIND BARS
Parts Three and Four

 

The students embark on yearlong senior projects. The prison debate team faces West Point and Harvard. Some students face the realities of going home. Bachelor’s and associate degrees are awarded on graduation day.

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI
What’s it Going to Take? The Health of Hawaiʻi’s People

 

PBS Hawaiʻi is asking What’s it Going to Take?, in an ongoing series of live televised forums seeking to galvanize decision-makers, communities and all of us to make life in Hawaiʻi better. This special edition of INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI (Thurs., Nov. 14, 8:00 pm) drills down on The Health of Hawaiʻi’s People.

 

A grim truth lies beneath the surface of Hawaiʻi’s four years of accolades as the healthiest state in the country. Hawaiʻi Community Foundation’s CHANGE Framework data shows that when income, neighborhood and ethnicity are factored in, almost one-third of island residents have high blood pressure – and residents in low-income areas on all islands live shorter lives. What’s it going to take to create a healthier Hawaiʻi? Join the conversation by phoning in, or by leaving us a comment on Facebook or Twitter.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 

What’s it Going to Take?

What’s it Going to Take? is an n ongoing community forum on making life better in Hawaiʻi. Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email, Twitter or live blogging. You may also email your questions ahead of time to insights@pbshawaii.org.

What’s it Going to Take?
An executive forum on making life better in Hawaiʻi

What's it Going to Take? - An executive forum on making life better in Hawaiʻi


Click the video above to watch What’s it Going to Take? on demand. Join host Leslie Wilcox for a live 2-hour conversation with top Hawaiʻi executives who bring detailed information and influence to help address deep-seated community problems. These executives are using detailed data* commissioned by the Hawaiʻi Community Foundation and combining their problem-solving experiences and influence to engage other sectors in a collaborative resolve to make life in Hawaiʻi better.

 

(Original airdate: Thursday, October 24, 2019)

 

Encore broadcasts of this program will air:
Sunday, October 27, 1 pm – 3 pm
Saturday, November 2, 8 pm – 10 pm

 

Hawaiʻi executives appearing on the program:

• Duane Kurisu, aio Founder, Hawaiʻi Executive Conference Chairman
• Catherine Ngo, President and CEO, Central Pacific Bank
• Bob Harrison, Chairman and CEO, First Hawaiian Bank
• Rich Wacker, President and CEO, American Savings Bank
• Micah Kāne, CEO and President, Hawaiʻi Community Foundation
• Colbert Matsumoto, Chairman, Tradewind Capital Group
• Jack Wong, CEO, Kamehameha Schools
• Elliot Mills, Vice President and General Manager, Aulani, Disney Resort and Spa
• Robert Nobriga, President, Island Holdings
• Ann Botticelli, Senior Vice President Communications and Public Affairs, Hawaiian Airlines

 

Click the link to learn more about the Change Framework: ChangeforHawaii.org

 

What's it Going to Take statistics: • Almost half of Hawaiʻi residents are barely making ends meet. • 6 out of 10 jobs pay less than a living wage. • 3 out of 4 people earning low wages still need housing. Source: Hawaiʻi Community Foundation

 

 

 

PATRICK SULLIVAN
Professional Problem Solver

By Liberty Peralta, PBS Hawaiʻi

 

Patrick Sullivan, Professional Problem Solver

Inset image, left: Sullivan as a University of Hawai‘i doctoral candidate in Engineering. Genie, right, is an Oceanit robotics and artificial intelligence project with two brains, eyes, ears and a mouth that is capable of tracking faces and specific expressions.

 

Patrick Sullivan Lifelong Problem Solver Tuesday, August 20 at 7:30 pm Professional Problem Solver Tuesday, August 27 at 7:30 pm Both program will be available online at pbshawaii.orgIt seems there’s no problem too big or too small for Patrick Sullivan of Kailua, Windward O‘ahu.

 

He wanted a car, so at age 13, he started working in food service jobs, saved up and bought a car at age 16.

 

He wanted to go to college, so at age 17, he applied for student loans, grants, and work study … and started a landscaping business to earn the money.

 

He visited the Islands during a college break, so to pay for his lodging, he cobbled together home improvement jobs for some people he met on the plane ride to O‘ahu.

 

So it seems natural that Sullivan is now in the business of problem solving. He’s the founder and chairman of Oceanit, a Honolulu-based company that uses science and innovation to create solutions to some of the world’s biggest challenges. One of the many projects that Oceanit is working on is a rapid-response solution to help an elderly person after a fall. Sullivan explains that an “inexpensive but effective robotic assistant” can help save a life.

 

This wall at Oceanit headquarters attracts visitor attention. Inset image: Deep-dive helmets, above, are being redesigned to reduce noise that causes hearing loss while maintaining the ability to communicate.

This wall at Oceanit headquarters attracts visitor attention. Inset image: Deep-dive helmets, above, are being redesigned to reduce noise that causes hearing loss while maintaining the ability to communicate.

 

The name “Oceanit” comes from a Greek and Latin term for “ocean dweller.” It’s an apt description for Sullivan, who gets in the water four to five times a week. It’s a tradition that started when his son Matthew and daughter Tarah were children. “Surfing is a way to reconnect to the world,” he says.

 

As Sullivan explains it, “Oceanit” is also an apt company name. “The ocean is a teacher in so many ways,” he says. “It covers everything from physics, chemistry, biology, hydromechanics, so [the ocean] is probably the biggest mashup of all science.”

 

Oceanit employs about 160 scientists and engineers and has raised more than $475 million in research and development funds. Its national and international client list includes governments, universities, organizations and businesses.

 

It’s no accident that Oceanit is based in Hawai‘i, and Sullivan credits it as a strength. “Innovation comes from differences, not sameness,” he says. “I think in the culture of Hawai‘i is innovation. The Native Hawaiians that came to Hawai‘i, they innovated to get here, and they innovated when they got here. They were not afraid of technology, afraid of change; they embraced it.”

 

Sullivan is familiar with constant change. Born in California, Sullivan spent his early years in Los Angeles. His family moved to Seattle after his father Thomas was hired as an aircraft mechanic for Boeing, a job that would end during a mass layoff. Sullivan’s family then moved multiple times to Texas, Wyoming and Arizona, before settling down in Colorado.

 

“I went to four different high schools, which brings its own challenges,” Sullivan says. “[My parents] tried to keep everything together, but it was just really hard.”

 

His parents, whose families moved West after the Great Depression, lacked the means to pursue an education, and had five children to care for. “That’s why an education was so important [to me],” he says.

 

With the rapid pace of technology replacing lowerwage service jobs, Sullivan underscores the importance of education.

 

“Adults need to consider lifelong learning,” he says. “That needs to be part of the culture, where we get comfortable with that, and it needs to be more available and affordable.”

 

Sullivan stresses that getting an education for the sake of education isn’t the point, but to build one’s “durability” as industries continue to evolve. It’s the kind of durability that’s helped Sullivan navigate change and tackle life’s challenges.

 

And with the business of problem solving, it seems there’s no end in sight.

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI
Sex Trafficking in Hawaiʻi

 

Sex trafficking, a multi-million dollar international industry that uses the internet and the street trade to exploit women, is real in Hawaiʻi. A study indicates that a disproportionate number of victims are Native Hawaiian women. The same study says that local law enforcement has been ineffective in addressing the problem, and even complicit in keeping it alive. Is there a solution? This week on INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI, we’ll discuss adult victims; a future episode will cover minors. You can join the discussion by phoning in, or leave us a comment on Facebook or Twitter.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 


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