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Changing Season:
On the Masumoto Family Farm

 

Review a transitional year in the life of farmer, slow food advocate and sansei David “Mas” Masumoto, and his relationship with his daughter Nikiko, who returns to the family farm with the intention of stepping into her father’s work boots.

 

 

PBS Hawai‘i to present encore of Eddie and Myrna Kamae’s films

PBS HAWAI‘I – News Release

315 Sand Island Access Rd.| p: 808.462.5000| pbshawaii.org
Honolulu, HI 96819-2295| f: 808.462.5090

The Hawaiian Legacy Foundation, PBS Hawai‘i

 

For questions regarding this press release, contact:
Liberty Peralta
lperalta@pbshawaii.org
808.462.5030­

 

Download this Press Release

 

The Films of Eddie and Myrna Kamae, From the HeartHONOLULU, HI – PBS Hawai‘i will present an encore of The Films of Eddie and Myrna Kamae, From the Heart – a broadcast and online presentation of all 10 films by the late Eddie Kamae and his wife and collaborator, Myrna Kamae.

 

The encore presentation runs from Sunday, March 18 through Thursday, March 22, at 8:00 pm on each night, on PBS Hawai‘i. (The broadcast schedule and film summaries are included on the following pages.) All 10 films will also be available to stream online March 23-April 6 at pbshawaii.org/kamaefilms.

 

Last April, PBS Hawai‘i partnered with the Kamaes’ Hawaiian Legacy Foundation to present this unprecedented televised and online film festival. This showcase features all 10 award-winning documentaries in Eddie and Myrna Kamae’s Hawaiian Legacy Series, released 1988-2009.

 

Broadcast Schedule

 

Sunday, March 18, 8:00 – 10:00 pm

 

Lia: The Legacy of a Hawaiian Man (1988)

This documentary celebrates the music and spirit of Big Island performer and composer, Sam Li‘a Kalainaina (1881-1975). It is also about a place, Waipi‘o Valley, and a life shaped and nourished by that place. This film’s world premiere opened the 1988 Hawai‘i International Film Festival.

 

Those Who Came Before: The Musical Journey of Eddie Kamae (2009)

The Kamae’s final documentary pays tribute to the music of Hawaiians, whose gifts of knowledge helped guide Eddie Kamae. His pursuits led him to some of the most respected gate-keepers of the Hawaiian Renaissance: the author and translator Mary Kawena Pukui, the “Songwriter of Waipi‘o” Sam Li‘a, “Aloha Chant” author Pilahi Paki, and Hawaiian cultural resource Lilia “Mama” Hale. One by one, they entrusted him with key pieces of Hawai‘i’s musical heritage – inspiring him to understand, perform, and pass on to the children of Hawai‘i.

 

Monday, March 19, 8:00 – 10:30 pm

 

Lahaina: Waves of Change (2007)

In 1999, Eddie Kamae visited Lahaina, only to find that Pioneer Mill, the center of Lahaina’s sugar industry, was closing down. It was the end of an era – a simpler, more innocent time that Eddie remembers from visiting his grandmother during childhood summers in Lahaina. Eddie leads us through many of the changes Lahaina has undergone, both historical and personal. And despite all of the radical changes and tumultuous times Lahaina has experienced, it remains a sacred Hawaiian place, not because of what has been built upon it, but because of what is in the hearts of people who live there.

 

The History of the Sons of Hawaii (2000)

This documentary tells the story of the charismatic band that helped launch the Hawaiian cultural renaissance. Spanning 40 years of Hawai‘i’s rich musical tradition, the film offers an intimate look at a unique group of performers and composers: their songs, their humor and their devotion to a sound that continues to convey something essential about the Hawaiian spirit.

 

Tuesday, March 20, 8:00 – 10:00 pm

 

Kī Hō‘alu: Slack Key, The Hawaiian Way (1993)

Kī hō‘alu (slack key) is the Hawaiian way of making music. Performers and composers reveal how this unique style of playing conveys something essential about the Hawaiian spirit and the Hawaiian family tradition.

 

Luther Kahekili Makekau: A One Kine Hawaiian Man (1997)

This documentary pays tribute to the untamed spirit of a colorful and controversial Hawaiian man. Known throughout the islands, Luther Makekau was part philosopher and part outlaw, a chanter and a singer, a fighter, a lover, a cattle rustler, a rebel and a poet. Born on Maui in 1890, during the reign of King Kalākaua, he lived nearly 100 years, shaped by a century of turbulent cultural change.

 

Wednesday, March 21, 8:00 – 10:00 pm

 

Listen to the Forest (1991)

This environmental documentary speaks of the widespread concern for rainforest preservation, while reminding us of traditional Hawaiian values. Interviews, chants, and original songs and dances give voice to an older form of ecological wisdom summed up in the phrase “mālama ‘āina,” to take care of the land.

 

Hawaiian Voices: Bridging Past to Present (1998)

This documentary honors the role of kūpuna (elders) in preserving Hawaiian culture. It focuses on the legacies of three respected Hawaiian elders whose lives bridged the transition from older times into the late 20th century. They are Ruth Makaila Kaholoa‘a, age 93, of the Big Island; Lilia Wahinemaika‘i Hale, age 85, of O‘ahu and Molokai; and Reverend David “Kawika” Ka‘alakea, age 78, of Maui. Each is a living archive of invaluable lore and recollection, a treasure whose stories, memories and perspectives need to be shared as a way of bringing the healing wisdom of the past into the often fragmented world of the present.

 

Thursday, March 22, 8:00 – 10:00 pm

 

Words, Earth & Aloha: The Source of Hawaiian Music (1995)

In Hawai‘i, music has always been much more than a form of entertainment. Through the centuries, it has been a primary means of cultural continuity. This documentary pays tribute to a wide range of composers who flourished between the 1870s and the 1920s, and for whom Hawaiian was still a first language. The film explores the poetry and play of Hawaiian lyrics, as well as the places and features of the natural world that inspired songs still loved and listened to today.

 

Keepers of the Flame: The Cultural Legacy of Three Hawaiian Women (2005)

This documentary chronicles the lives of three Hawaiian women who helped to save the Hawaiian culture, which was in serious peril. The combined artistry and aloha of Mary Kawena Pukui, ‘Iolani Luahine and Edith Kanaka‘ole “helped to revive the flame of traditional Hawaiian culture – a flame that had almost died,” says Eddie Kamae in his on-camera introduction to the film.

 


PBS Hawai‘i is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization and Hawai‘i’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i to the world. pbshawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii


The Hawaiian Legacy Foundation, founded by Eddie and Myrna Kamae, is a nonprofit organization that seeks to document, preserve and perpetuate the cultural heritage of Hawaiʻi through music, film and video, educational programs, community outreach and archival work. hawaiianlegacyfoundation.org


 

 

SHELTER ME:
Hearts & Paws

 

This inspiring series celebrates the human-animal bond by telling positive stories. Each story shows how people’s lives are improved when shelter pets are given a second chance.

 

Host Kristen Bell (Frozen) introduces new stories, including one features award-winning artist Patrick McDonnell, creator of the Mutts comic strip. Patrick spent several days at the New York City animal shelter and turned his experience into a week’s worth of comics called “Shelter Stories.” We also follow the journey of a pet from the day she is surrendered to a shelter until the day she is adopted. Another segment features the first cat cafe in the country. Cat Town Cafe has partnered with the Oakland Animal Shelter to provide an innovative way to showcase cats and boost adoptions in their community.

 

SHELTER ME:
New Beginnings

 

This inspiring series celebrates the human-animal bond by telling positive stories. Each story shows how people’s lives are improved when shelter pets are given a second chance.

 

Aimee Sadler’s program is based on the simple concept that dogs love to play. Many shelters keep dogs isolated in their kennels. Aimee shows the shelters how to get groups of dogs in a yard to play and learn from each other. These play groups turn shelters into joyful adoption centers and completely change how shelter dogs are perceived and adopted.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
What Needs to be Done to Reduce Drug Abuse in Hawai‘i?

 

A decade after Hawai‘i’s high-profile War on Ice, crystal methamphetamine remains Hawai‘i’s No. 1 illegal drug threat. While prescription painkillers, heroin and other drugs are rising in use, officials say crystal meth is still linked to the most drug-trafficking crimes and the most drug-related deaths. INSIGHTS asks: what needs to be done to reduce drug abuse in Hawai‘i?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

John Denver:
Country Boy

John Denver: Country Boy

 

Air date: Fri., Aug. 14, 9:00 pm

 

At the peak of his fame in the 1970s, John Denver was one of the most popular singers in America. He performed at sold-out concerts, his albums sold more than 100 million copies, his TV specials got top ratings and he was named poet laureate of his adopted Colorado. Yet this man, who brought happiness to millions, was filled with insecurity, suffered from depression and was savaged by the music critics. Exploring the private life and public legacy of “America’s Everyman,” this intimate profile includes exclusive accounts from those closest to him, including former wives and managers, his son and brother, the musicians who toured with him for decades and the friends who knew the real John Denver.

 

Soul of a Banquet

 

Director Wayne Wang (The Joy Luck Club) ventures into the world of Cecilia Chiang, the woman who introduced America to authentic Chinese food. Chiang opened her internationally renowned restaurant The Mandarin in 1961 in San Francisco and went on to change the course of cuisine in America. The film is equal parts delectable showcase of gastronomy and touching portrait of Chiang’s journey from a childhood in Beijing before the Cultural Revolution to accidental restaurateur on the west coast of the United States. Featuring interviews with Alice Waters, Ruth Reichl and Chiang herself.

 

Teacher Resources

 

Visit the HIKI NŌ Curriculum Website

Download the HIKI NŌ Curriculum Alignment Document

Click to view in your browser or alt/option click or right click to save file to download.

Download the HIKI NŌ Curriculum PDF Version

 


HIKI NŌ RESOURCES AND TUTORIALS


 

1. HIKI NŌ PARTICIPANT RELEASE FORM
Students producing the video: Complete and submit the HIKI NŌ Participant Release Form.

 

HIKI NŌ TECHNICAL SPECS
2. For Camera

 

3. For Editing

 

4. Complete the appropriate pitch sheet:
HIKI NŌ SEASON 10 STORY PITCH SHEET
HIKI NŌ SEASON 10 PROFILE PITCH SHEET
HIKI NŌ SEASON 10 HOW-TO PITCH SHEET

 

5. FRAMING AN INTERVIEW (2:44)
This tutorial covers the “do’s and don’ts” of framing an interview subject.

(by Lawrence E. Pacheco)

 

6. PROPER AUDIO LEVELS (1:26)
A basic understanding of proper audio levels and the difference between analog and digital levels.

(by Lawrence E. Pacheco)

 

7. AUDIO NOISE (3:35)
Do you think you can determine what noise is in your audio? Find out.

(by Lawrence E. Pacheco)

 

8. SCRIPT TEMPLATE AND SAMPLE SCRIPT

 

9. STORY PREMISE (4:23)
Discover how a ‘story premise’ can help you in shaping your personal profile story.

(by Robert Pennybacker)

 

10. 5-POINT OUTLINE (4:48)
Find out how creating a 5-Point Story Outline can help make a successful HIKI NŌ story.

(by Robert Pennybacker)

 

11. SHOOTING A SEQUENCE (9:32)
Learn how to best shoot and utilize a video b-roll sequence in your story.
(Edited by Akane Kashiwazaki and narrated by Robert Pennybacker)

 

12. PACING (7:08)
This tutorial explains how to better pace your edits to achieve the proper mood and emotion for your story.

(by Robert Pennybacker)

 

13. STANDARD OUTCUE (2:27)
Learn what a HIKI NŌ Standard Outcue is and why it’s important.

(by Lawrence E. Pacheco)

 

14. UPLOADING YOUR FINAL STORY (2:48)
Is your story approved for air on HIKI NŌ? Then here’s how and where to upload it!

(Narrated by Kelsea Gines of Saint Francis School)

 

15. HIKI NŌ SUPERS & CREDITS LIST
Your last step is to complete the supers and credits form and select a still photo of your crew to run with the credits.

 

16. HOW TO SHOOT A HOST SEGMENT THAT HAS NO B-ROLL (4:49)
In this tutorial we will go over how to shoot a host segment using only an on-camera host with no B-roll.

(Narrated by Nikki Miyamoto)

 

 

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