queen

VICTORIA ON MASTERPIECE
The Queen’s Husband

VICTORIA ON MASTERPIECE: The Queens Husband

 

This seven-part dramatic series follows Victoria (Jenna Coleman) from the time she becomes Queen in 1837 at the age of 18 through her relationship with Lord Melbourne (Rufus Sewell), her first prime minister and intimate friend, and her courtship and marriage to Prince Albert (Tom Hughes).

 

The Queen’s Husband
At loose ends in a foreign land, Albert finds a noble cause. Victoria gets her way at court and resorts to a folk cure in the bedroom. Francatelli does Miss Skerrett a favor – for a price.

 

Tales from the Royal Wardrobe

 

Examine the significance of the royal wardrobes of English monarchs over the last 400 years. Learn why most kings and queens have carefully choreographed every aspect of their apparel and why, for those who haven’t, the consequences have sometimes been calamitous.

 

SECRETS OF THE DEAD
Teotihuacan’s Lost Kings

 

Follow a team of scientists exploring royal tombs beneath the ancient Mexican city of Teotihuacan. After decades of research, these imperial burial chambers may reveal clues about the long-lost Teotihuacan culture and its mysterious people.

 

A Royal Connection

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiBritain’s Queen Victoria, ruler of the most powerful nation in the world in her time, and Queen Emma of Hawai‘i, ali‘i of the most isolated archipelago, formed a friendship that bridged the long distance and the 17-year difference in their ages.

 

It was a friendship born of grief.

 

In the Hawaiian Journal of History, researcher Rhoda E.A. Hackler wrote about the queens’ 20-year, off-and-on correspondence.

 

Queen Victoria lost her husband and the father of their nine children when Prince-Consort Albert was just 42. The following year, the four-year-old son of Queen Emma and her husband, King Kamehameha IV (Alexander Liholiho), died of what was then described as “brain fever.” The child was named Albert, after Victoria’s husband.

 

Queen Victoria, still deeply mourning her husband’s death, reached out to Emma:

 

“As a mother you will understand how fully I am able to appreciate the depth of your grief…As a wife, I can sincerely hope that you may be spared the heavier blow which has plunged me into lifelong sorrow, but which makes my heart tenderly alive to all the sorrows of others.”

 

A year later, Emma wrote to Victoria:

 

“My heart is very, very heavy while I make known to Your Majesty that God has visited with me with that great trouble which in your kind and consoling letter you said you hoped I might be spared. On the 30th of November my Husband, of whose danger I had never entertained one thought, expired suddenly, almost while in the act of speaking to me, and it was a long while before they could make me believe that what I saw was death and that he had really left me alone for the remainder of my life.”

 

Victoria’s reply came quickly:

 

“…My bleeding heart can truly sympathize with you in your terrible desolation! A dear & promising only child & a beloved husband have both been taken from you within two years! Time does not heal the really stricken heart!..”

 

Two years after the death of Queen Emma’s husband, she traveled to England, raised money for the construction of the Cathedral of St. Andrew in Honolulu, and met Queen Victoria.

 

Victoria penned in her journal:

 

“Nothing could be nicer or more dignified than her manner…She was dressed in just the same widow’s weeds as I wear.”

 

Later in Emma’s trip, she was accorded the honor of being asked to spend the night at Windsor Castle.

 

Over the years, the queens shared personal news, much of it sad. Victoria lost a grandchild to diphtheria; Emma noted that typhoid fever was ravaging the Islands, killing “the young and the strong.”

 

Always, in this correspondence between royal “dear friends,” there is a sense of gratitude in being able to express profound loss and in being heard and understood.

 

Aloha a hui hou,
Leslie signature

 

SOUNDBREAKING
The Human Instrument

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This wide-ranging, eight-part series, airing weeknights Nov. 14-23, explores the extraordinary impact of recorded music on our modern world. The series offers unprecedented access to more than 150 artists and producers from across the music spectrum, and features rare archival studio footage and an extensive soundtrack.

 

This series was the last creative project for Sir George Martin, the producer who was instrumental behind many of The Beatles’ albums, before he passed away in March.

 

The Human Instrument
Celebrate the art and science of recording the human voice, the soul of a song. Featured: Adele, Christina Aguilera, Ray Charles, Cher, Aretha Franklin, Janis Joplin, Queen, Bonnie Raitt, Tom Waits and more.

 

CURIOUS TRAVELER
Curious About – London

 

Journalist Christine Van Blokland brings her passion and genuine curiosity for the arts, quirky characters, storytelling and lifelong learning to an exploration of London. She asks: Why is St. Paul’s Cathedral such an iconic symbol of London? And why doesn’t it face due East? And what does St. Paul have to do with the City of London crest? What is the City of London and why can’t the Queen come in? Why do so many London neighborhoods end in -gate? Why is Temple Church round? And what did those secretive Knights Templar do here? And what does all of this have to do with Magna Carta – and why has a copy remained at Salisbury Church for 800 years?

 

NA MELE
Queen Emma – Her Life and Legacy

 

Na Mele: Queen Emma – Her Life and Legacy features traditional Hawaiian chants and songs created to honor and record the life of Queen Emma. The Queen Emma Summer Palace in Nuuanu serves as center stage. The Summer Palace, or Hānaiakamalama (nurtured by the moon) as it’s also known, was a place of respite for Queen Emma and her husband, King Kamehameha IV. Despite the tragedies in her life – the loss of her 4 year old son, Albert, and her husband, King Kamehameha IV – Queen Emma had the strength and fortitude to establish institutions that continue to serve Hawaii today: The Cathedral of St. Andrew, The Queenʻs Medical Center and St. Andrewʻs Priory School for Girls.

 

In the hula performance of “Aia I Nu‘uanu,” the dancers and kumu hula chant, “Aia ka nana i Nu‘uanu, I walea ‘Emalani i laila, Ka ‘olu kohai i ka makani” (There is the beauty at Nu‘uanu, such that Emalani is at ease there, comfortable, swaying in the breeze). The halau dances with the Summer Palace quietly looking over them, as if the Queen herself is observing and appreciating their hula. Also performing hula about Queen Emma and the places she loved is Hālau Haʻa Hula ʻO Kekauʻilani Nā Pua Hala O Kailua and a halau made up of students from St. Andrew’s Priory School for Girls. The Emmalani Serenaders also lend their voices to praise Queen Emma, performing Kaleleonālani and Hole Waimea.

 

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawaii President and CEO, will host the program, alongside special guests from the Daughters of Hawai‘i, St. Andrew’s Priory, and The Cathedral of St. Andrew.

 

Original air date: Sun., June 7, 7:00 pm

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
What Would It Take to Achieve Hawaiian Sovereignty?

 

In 1993, President Bill Clinton signed a law apologizing for the overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom, fueling hopes that an independent Hawaiian nation would be recognized by the federal government. Twenty-two years later, sovereignty proponents continue to push for recognition in Congress, while new pathways toward nation-building emerge at home. What might an independent Hawaiian nation look like? Daryl Huff moderates the discussion.

 

You can watch the ‘After the Show’ discussion of this program here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sGt8YjEZ8gw&feature=youtu.be

 

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