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COUNTRY MUSIC
A Film by Ken Burns

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COUNTRY MUSIC premieres September 15, 2019
All programs begin at 8:00 pm

Preview

 

Explore the history of a uniquely American art form: country music. From its deep and tangled roots in ballads, blues and hymns performed in small settings, to its worldwide popularity, learn how country music evolved over the course of the twentieth century. The series, directed by Ken Burns, features never-before-seen footage and photographs, plus interviews with more than 80 country music artists. No one has told the story this way before.


 

COUNTRY MUSIC: A Film by Ken Burns - The Rub (Beginnings – 1933)

The Rub (Beginnings – 1933)

Sunday, Sept. 15, 8:00 pm

See how what was first called “hillbilly music” reaches new audiences through phonographs and radio, and launches the careers of country music’s first big stars, the Carter Family and Jimmie Rodgers.

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COUNTRY MUSIC: A Film by Ken Burns - Hard Times (1933 – 1945)

Hard Times (1933 – 1945)

Monday, Sept. 16, 8:00 pm

Watch as Nashville becomes the heart of the country music industry. The genre grows in popularity during the Great Depression and World War II as America falls in love with singing cowboys, Texas Swing and the Grand Ole Opry’s Roy Acuff.

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COUNTRY MUSIC: A Film by Ken Burns - The Hillbilly Shakespeare (1945 – 1953)

The Hillbilly Shakespeare (1945 – 1953)

Tuesday, Sept. 17, 8:00 pm

See how the bluegrass sound spreads in post-war America, and meet honky-tonk star Hank Williams, whose songs of surprising emotional depth are derived from his troubled and tragically short life.

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COUNTRY MUSIC: A Film by Ken Burns - I Can’t Stop Loving You (1953 – 1963)

I Can’t Stop Loving You (1953 – 1963)

Wednesday, Sept. 18, 8:00 pm

Travel to Memphis, where Sun Studios artists Johnny Cash and Elvis Presley usher in the era of rockabilly. Ray Charles crosses America’s racial divide by recording a country album. Patsy Cline shows off Music City’s smooth new Nashville Sound.

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COUNTRY MUSIC: A Film by Ken Burns - The Sons and Daughters of America (1964 – 1968)

The Sons and Daughters of America (1964 – 1968)

Sunday, Sept. 22, 8:00 pm

See how country music reflects a changing America, with Loretta Lynn speaking to women everywhere, Merle Haggard becoming “The Poet of the Common Man” and audiences looking beyond race to embrace Charley Pride.

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COUNTRY MUSIC: A Film by Ken Burns - Will the Circle Be Unbroken? (1968 – 1972)

Will the Circle Be Unbroken? (1968 – 1972)

Monday, Sept. 23, 8:00 pm

Learn how country music responds to a nation divided by the Vietnam War, as Army captain turned songwriter Kris Kristofferson sets a new lyrical standard, and artists like Bob Dylan and the Byrds find a recording home in Nashville.

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COUNTRY MUSIC: A Film by Ken Burns - Are You Sure Hank Done It This Way? (1973 – 1983)

Are You Sure Hank Done It This Way? (1973 – 1983)

Tuesday, Sept. 24, 8:00 pm

Witness a vibrant era in country music, with Dolly Parton finding mainstream success; Hank Williams, Jr. and Rosanne Cash emerging from their famous fathers’ shadows; and Willie Nelson and Waylon Jennings launching the “Outlaw” movement.

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COUNTRY MUSIC: A Film by Ken Burns - Don’t Get Above Your Raisin’ (1984 – 1996)

Don’t Get Above Your Raisin’ (1984 – 1996)

Wednesday, Sept. 25, 8:00 pm

Learn how “New Traditionalists” like George Strait, Randy Travis and the Judds help country music stay true to its roots. Witness both the rise of superstar Garth Brooks and the return of an aging Johnny Cash to the industry he helped create.

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COUNTRY MUSIC:
Live at the Ryman, a Concert Celebrating the Film by Ken Burns

 

Join celebrated musicians for a concert celebrating the film by Ken Burns. Hosted by Burns and featuring performances and appearances by Dierks Bentley, Rosanne Cash, Rhiannon Giddens, Vince Gill, Kathy Mattea, Marty Stuart, Dwight Yoakam and more.

 

COUNTRY MUSIC: Live at the Ryman, a Concert Celebrating the Film by Ken Burns

 

 

 

 

FINDING YOUR ROOTS
Roots in Politics

FINDING YOUR ROOTS: Roots in Politics. Tulsi Gabbard

 

Host Henry Louis Gates, Jr. explores the diverse family histories of politicians Paul Ryan, Tulsi Gabbard and Marco Rubio. They each see a shared vision of the great American melting pot reflected in their ancestors’ stories.

 

Preview

 

 

 

And Then They Came for Us

And Then They Came for Us

 

Seventy-five years ago, Executive Order 9066 paved the way to the profound violation of constitutional rights that resulted in the forced incarceration of 120,000 Japanese Americans. Featuring George Takei and many others who were incarcerated, as well as newly rediscovered photographs of Dorothea Lange, And Then They Came for Us brings history into the present, retelling this difficult story and following Japanese American activists as they speak out against the Muslim registry and travel ban.

 

Preview

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
HIKI NŌ Class of 2018 Special, Part 1 of 4

 

Over the summer, twelve outstanding HIKI NŌ graduates from the class of 2018 gathered at PBS Hawai‘i to discuss their HIKI NŌ experiences and how they feel the skills they learned from HIKI NŌ will help them in college, the workplace and life. Their insightful and refreshingly honest conversations can be seen in four HIKI NŌ Class of 2018 Specials.

 

This first special features Brooke Kanna, who graduated from Kaua‘i High School in Līhu‘e and is now majoring in Cinema and Media Arts at Biola University in Southern California; Yasha Ronquillo, who graduated from Maui High School in Kahului and is now majoring in Applied Business and Information Technology at the University of Hawai‘i Maui College; and Grace Benton, who graduated from Kalāheo High School in Windward O‘ahu and is now majoring in Data Science at the University of San Francisco.

 

To start each episode, each graduate shows a HIKI NŌ story that they worked on and discusses what they learned from the experience of working on that particular story. Yasha presents her story “I Am Able,” about a middle school student with spina bifida who won’t let his handicap keep him from pursuing his dreams. Grace shows “Agnes’ Portuguese Bake Shop,” about the closing of a landmark Windward O‘ahu bakery. Brooke shows her story “J-1 Visa Program,” about a program run by McDonald’s that gives teenagers from foreign countries hands-on work experience.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 22, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 23, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

 

 

GROWING BOLDER
Leave The Past Behind and Start Growing Bolder

GROWING BOLDER: Leave The Past Behind and Start Growing Bolder

 

In this episode of Growing Bolder TV: why keep doing something that doesn’t make you feel like you’re living your best life? Get inspired to make changes and pursue your true passions.

 

Featured stories:

• The Extraordinary Life of Ms. Vi
• Toni Tennille on Starting Over at 75
• Financial Planning is Life Planning
• John Seevers is Standing Tall
• Military Legend Shares His Memories of D-Day
• The Takeaway: Wear the White Hat

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Focus on Generation Z

 

This special edition of HIKI NŌ highlights some of the best stories from the winter quarter of the 2015-16 school year. Besides being excellent stories, the features in this compilation were also selected for how they reflect the values of Generation Z: people born in 1995 or later. HIKI NŌ students, currently middle and high schoolers, are part of Generation Z. National surveys show that, in general, Gen Z-ers are tech-savvy entrepreneurs who are very aware of the world’s problems and are looking for practical ways to solve them. They are empathetic to others, socially conscious, tend not be gender or age biased and share an affinity with senior citizens.

 

The stories featured in this compilation, along with the Gen Z trends they reflect, are:

 

“A Home for Larenzo” (Waianae Intermediate School – Oahu)
A student leader at the Waianae Boys and Girls Club is found to be homeless.
Gen Z trend: They are growing up in a post 9/11 world during a recession, with 1 in 4 American children living in poverty.

 

“Science Teacher” (Sacred Hearts Academy – Oahu)
A female science teacher at an all-girls school receives national recognition from President Obama.
Gen Z trend: Traditional gender roles are being challenged.

 

“Ukulele Hale” (Mid-Pacific – Oahu)
An ukulele virtuoso decides to open his own music school rather than be employed by someone else’s school.
Gen Z trend: Entrepreneurship is in their DNA.

 

“Dog Wheelchair” (Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School – Kauai)
An 8th grade girl uses an engineering app to design and build a wheelchair for her disabled dog.
Gen Z trend: They use technology to solve problems.

 

“Deaf Cheerleader” (Maui High School – Maui)
A deaf high school student is determined to do everything her hearing peers can do, including being part of the Junior Varsity cheerleading squad.
Gen Z trend: They are empathetic and accepting of differences.

 

“Joe Young” (Kapaa Middle School – Kauai)
A retired police officer beats prostate cancer without surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy. His cure: leading a happy life.
Gen Z trend: They have a great affinity and respect for elders.

 

“Iloreta Brothers” (Kapaa High School – Kauai)
A young man with Cerebral Palsy and his brother participate in long distance runs to promote their social awareness campaign called “I Am My Ability, I Am Not My Disability.”
Gen Z trend: They exhibit social entrepreneurship.

 

This edition of HIKI NŌ is hosted by HIKI NŌ alumna, University of Hawaii at Manoa Communications/Political Science major, and Gen Z-er Shisa Kahaunaele.

 

This program encores Saturday, April 9 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, April 10 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.