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INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI
What’s it Going to Take? The Health of Hawaiʻi’s People

 

PBS Hawaiʻi is asking What’s it Going to Take?, in an ongoing series of live televised forums seeking to galvanize decision-makers, communities and all of us to make life in Hawaiʻi better. This special edition of INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI (Thurs., Nov. 14, 8:00 pm) drills down on The Health of Hawaiʻi’s People.

 

A grim truth lies beneath the surface of Hawaiʻi’s four years of accolades as the healthiest state in the country. Hawaiʻi Community Foundation’s CHANGE Framework data shows that when income, neighborhood and ethnicity are factored in, almost one-third of island residents have high blood pressure – and residents in low-income areas on all islands live shorter lives. What’s it going to take to create a healthier Hawaiʻi? Join the conversation by phoning in, or by leaving us a comment on Facebook or Twitter.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI
What’s it Going to Take? – Low Wages and the Lack of Affordability in Hawaiʻi

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI is taking a deeper dive into longstanding problems highlighted during our two-hour live program, What’s it Going to Take? An executive forum on making life better in Hawaiʻi.

 

· 51% of renting households in Hawai’i spend more than 30% of their income on rent. · 38% of jobs pay a living wage, which equates to more than $20/hour. · 48% of households do not meet the Survival Budget level and struggle to afford living in Hawaiʻi (Source: Hawaiʻi Community Foundation)

 

Click the link to learn more about the Change Framework: ChangeforHawaii.org

 

The first of three special editions of INSIGHTS will focus on Low Wages and the Lack of Affordability in Hawaiʻi. Those scheduled to appear on the program include: the band director of Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School in Līhuʻe, Kauaʻi; the owner of a small business in Mānoa, Oʻahu; a warehouse worker from Pālolo, Oʻahu; and a University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa economist. You can join the conversation by phoning in, or by leaving us a comment on Facebook or Twitter. INSIGHTS is also streamed live on pbshawaii.org and PBS Hawaiʻi’s Facebook page.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
Harvest Season

INDEPENDENT LENS: Harvest Season

 

A story usually hidden behind a more glamorous front, Harvest Season probes the lives of the multigenerational Latinos, temporary laborers, and permanent residents intimately connected to the production of premium wines in the Napa and Sonoma regions of Northern California — in the midst of one of the most dramatic grape harvests in recent memory.

 

Preview

 

 

 

FAMILY PICTURES USA
Detroit

 

Explore America’s comeback city through photos and personal stories shared by residents. From the influence of the auto industry to labor unions to the Motown sound, Detroit’s multilayered story is revealed via family narratives and memories.

 

 

 

POV SHORTS
The Changing Same

 

In the Florida Panhandle lies the town of Marianna, Florida, where one native resident runs a local marathon to commemorate the lynching of Claude Neal. More than 80 years after his violent murder, this film lifts the veil of racial terror buried in this town’s history.

 

 

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
My Country No More

INDEPENDENT LENS: My Country No More

 

Between 2011 and 2016, oil drilling in rural North Dakota reached its peak, setting off a modern-day gold rush in the quiet, tight-knit farm town of Trenton, North Dakota, population less than 1000. With billions of dollars to be gained in an industry-friendly state with a “reasonable regulation” climate, small towns like Trenton became overwhelmed by an influx of workers, and countless acres of farmland were repurposed for industrial development. Through the voices of Trenton’s residents, My Country No More challenges the notion of “progress” and questions the long-term human consequences of short-term approaches to land use, decisions that ultimately affect all Americans, rural and urban alike.

 

Preview

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI
The Haʻikū Stairs

 

Whatʻs the next step for the Stairs? The future of The Haʻikū Stairs has been fiercely debated for years. Also known as the Thousand Steps or the Stairway to Heaven, the long, narrow step structures make for a stunningly beautiful hike, high up a Windward Oʻahu ridge, providing panoramic views often posted on social media. The hike is both popular and illegal. Residents in a nearby Kāneʻohe neighborhood have endured the trespassers and their noise for many years. The current owner of most of the land under the deteriorating stairs, the Honolulu Board of Water Supply, wants to free itself of the liability and tear down the stairs – or transfer responsibility. Join the conversation on INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI. You can phone in, or leave us a comment on Facebook or Twitter.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 


INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI
Ala Wai Flood Control Project

 

Plans to prevent massive flooding in Waikīkī have been in the works for years, as worries mount over the threat of a major storm causing the Ala Wai Canal to overflow. Drawn up by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Ala Wai Flood Control Project would take private residential land along the canal for flood mitigation. Property owners object and say there wasn’t enough opportunity for public input. What do you think?

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 

 


INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI:
Ala Moana Park Plan

 

Ala Moana Regional Park on Oʻahu’s south shore is a beloved playground for local residents, with access to surfing, swimming, paddleboarding, tennis, walking and picnicking. The city of Honolulu has a master plan to revitalize the park. Not everyone agrees with the plan’s vision. Join our discussion on the Ala Moana Park Plan on the next INSIGHTSON PBS HAWAIʻI.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 

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