resident

Who You Gonna Call?

 

CEO Message

 

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO

It‘s time for a new three-year strategic plan for this 55-year-old nonprofit organization serving our beloved, troubled state. How does one know, in changing, uncertain times, what Hawai‘i will need most from PBS Hawai‘i? How can we best serve our viewers and fellow citizens?

 

We take very seriously the feedback we receive from our Community Advisory Board Members, who live in communities across the state and who pay attention – to their island turf and to PBS Hawai‘i’s programming.

 

In a moving discussion, full of humanity, the Board told staffers that 1) We need to keep convening diverse voices in a neutral space, because common ground and solutions are getting harder to find; 2) We need to illuminate learning about the Hawaiian culture; 3) HIKI NŌ should expand its range to provide life, school and work skills to students in grade school through college; 4) We need to keep serving young children with curriculum-rich programming, since more than half do not attend preschool.

 

PBS Hawai‘i Community Advisory Board!

 
2020 Community Advisory Board photo
 

Top row (L-R): Kaʻimi Kaupiko, Miloliʻi, Hawaiʻi Island, cultural specialist and teacher; Lei Kihoi, Kailua-Kona, Hawaiʻi Island, attorney and community activist;
Chuck Boller, Windward Oʻahu,
international film consultant;
Chair Karen Knudsen, East Honolulu,
East-West Center executive;
Kainoa Horcajo, Wailuku, Maui,
Grand Wailea Hotel cultural advisor;
Shawn Malia Kanaʻiaupuni, PhD,
Windward Oʻahu, Kamehameha Schools executive strategy consultant;
Dennis Bunda, Central Oʻahu,
Aloha Spirit Foundation executive director
Bottom row (L-R): Les Murashige,
Central Oʻahu and Līhuʻe, Kauaʻi,
retired Island Air chief executive officer; Momi Akana, Kalihi Valley, Honolulu, Keiki O KaʻĀina Family Learning Centers leader; Marissa Sandblom, Līhuʻe, Kaua‘i, Common Ground Kauaʻi chief
operations officer


Not pictured: Cheryl Kaʻuhane Lupenui, North Hawaiʻi Island, The Kohala Center president and chief executive officer

 

Family services leader Momi Akana wanted us to know that it’s not only a lack of affordability or geographical distance that keeps keiki from preschool. She said that parents who have been sexually or otherwise physically abused as children are very wary of leaving their little ones with adults they don’t know. That’s why many of these parents choose PBS KIDS to help educate their toddlers at home, Momi said. There was concerned silence as we all pondered this.

 

It’s a Board that keeps things simple and straightforward – and deep. Main thing, said advisors: “Keep Hawai‘i’s trust. It’s tough to earn, easy to lose.”

 

Aloha nui,

Leslie signature

 


PBS Hawai‘i honors the life of longtime volunteer, Matsuko Kawana. Matsuko, or as we affectionately called her, “Grandma,” passed away peacefully in February at age 101. We will remember and miss her sweet smile, her stories of growing up on O‘ahu and Maui and her hardworking and humble nature. Rest in aloha, Matsuko.

A Life Well Lived

PBS Hawaiʻi honors the life of longtime volunteer, Matsuko Kawana. Matsuko, or as we affectionately called her, “Grandma,” passed away peacefully in February at age 101. We will remember and miss her sweet smile, her stories of growing up on O‘ahu and Maui and her hardworking and humble nature. Rest in aloha, Matsuko.


 

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
We Believe in Dinosaurs

 

Learn about the building of a $120 million Noah’s Ark exhibit, backed by the Creation Museum in Williamstown, Kentucky, and designed to prove the Bible is historically and scientifically accurate, and hear from residents who support and oppose it.

 

 

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
Cooked: Survival by Zip Code

 

Learn the story of a heat wave that overtook Chicago in July 1995, killing 739 residents, most of them poor, elderly and African American. The heat wave revealed a long-term crisis of poverty, racism, and economic and social isolation in the city.

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI
Climate Change: Is Hawaiʻi Prepared?

 

Climate Change: Is Hawaiʻi Prepared? Intense rain events inflicting extensive damage and record flooding; active hurricane seasons that keep residents on edge; coastal erosion imperiling highways and homes; extreme droughts that hurt agriculture and fuel dangerous wildfires – these are natural events that experts say are linked to climate change. Join the conversation on INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI. You can phone in or leave us a comment on Facebook or Twitter.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI – What’s it Going to Take? – Affordable Housing Crisis

 

PBS Hawaiʻi continues to ask What’s it Going to Take? in a continuing series of live on-air/online forums seeking to engage the community-at-large and policymakers in authentic conversations about making life better in Hawaiʻi.

 

Data compiled within the Hawaiʻi Community Foundation’s CHANGE Framework, as well as in reports commissioned by the State of Hawaiʻi, demonstrate that we truly have an Affordable Housing Crisis. There are far too few homes that residents can afford to rent or buy, causing families to double and triple up and even leave the Islands. This continuing crisis is the subject of our next special edition of INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI – What’s It Going to Take?. We expect to hear from developers of private-sector housing, a State agency charged with generating low- and moderate-income housing and a non-profit advocacy group for affordable housing. Join the conversation by phoning in or leaving us a comment on Facebook or Twitter.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI
What’s it Going to Take? – Does Hawaiʻi Have the Will and the Resiliency to Build a Better Future?

 

PBS Hawaiʻi continues to ask What’s It Going to Take?, in an ongoing series of live televised forums seeking to galvanize decision-makers, communities and all of us to make life in Hawaiʻi better. Does Hawaiʻi Have the Will and the Resiliency to Build a Better Future? That’s the subject of our next special edition of INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI. The numbers are daunting, even scary. Nearly 50% of Hawaiʻi residents barely get by; 62% of all jobs in in the state pay less than $20 per hour; and the crisis in affordable housing drives many people to leave Hawaiʻi for the Continent. But others stay, and some return, drawn by family, culture and the aloha spirit. Join the discussion by phoning in or leaving us a comment on Facebook or Twitter. INSIGHTS is also streamed live on pbshawaii.org and PBS Hawaiʻi’s Facebook page.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI
What’s it Going to Take? The Health of Hawaiʻi’s People

 

PBS Hawaiʻi is asking What’s it Going to Take?, in an ongoing series of live televised forums seeking to galvanize decision-makers, communities and all of us to make life in Hawaiʻi better. This special edition of INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI (Thurs., Nov. 14, 8:00 pm) drills down on The Health of Hawaiʻi’s People.

 

A grim truth lies beneath the surface of Hawaiʻi’s four years of accolades as the healthiest state in the country. Hawaiʻi Community Foundation’s CHANGE Framework data shows that when income, neighborhood and ethnicity are factored in, almost one-third of island residents have high blood pressure – and residents in low-income areas on all islands live shorter lives. What’s it going to take to create a healthier Hawaiʻi? Join the conversation by phoning in, or by leaving us a comment on Facebook or Twitter.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI
What’s it Going to Take? – Low Wages and the Lack of Affordability in Hawaiʻi

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI is taking a deeper dive into longstanding problems highlighted during our two-hour live program, What’s it Going to Take? An executive forum on making life better in Hawaiʻi.

 

· 51% of renting households in Hawai’i spend more than 30% of their income on rent. · 38% of jobs pay a living wage, which equates to more than $20/hour. · 48% of households do not meet the Survival Budget level and struggle to afford living in Hawaiʻi (Source: Hawaiʻi Community Foundation)

 

Click the link to learn more about the Change Framework: ChangeforHawaii.org

 

The first of three special editions of INSIGHTS will focus on Low Wages and the Lack of Affordability in Hawaiʻi. Those scheduled to appear on the program include: the band director of Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School in Līhuʻe, Kauaʻi; the owner of a small business in Mānoa, Oʻahu; a warehouse worker from Pālolo, Oʻahu; and a University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa economist. You can join the conversation by phoning in, or by leaving us a comment on Facebook or Twitter. INSIGHTS is also streamed live on pbshawaii.org and PBS Hawaiʻi’s Facebook page.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
Harvest Season

INDEPENDENT LENS: Harvest Season

 

A story usually hidden behind a more glamorous front, Harvest Season probes the lives of the multigenerational Latinos, temporary laborers, and permanent residents intimately connected to the production of premium wines in the Napa and Sonoma regions of Northern California — in the midst of one of the most dramatic grape harvests in recent memory.

 

Preview

 

 

 

FAMILY PICTURES USA
Detroit

 

Explore America’s comeback city through photos and personal stories shared by residents. From the influence of the auto industry to labor unions to the Motown sound, Detroit’s multilayered story is revealed via family narratives and memories.

 

 

 

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