reverence

GET CAUGHT READING
More Islanders Choose Hawaiʻi Books

 

CEO Message

 

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEOWhat would you pick if you were asked to share any passage you want from a book or story or poem or other written word?

 

“Anything I want?” is one person’s stricken reaction. “Do you know how difficult that is to narrow down?”

 

Well, thank goodness there’s so much richness in literature and life from which to choose!

 

In PBS Hawaiʻi’s new video read-aloud initiative GET CAUGHT READING, with community partners Farmers Insurance and the Hawaii State Public Library System, it’s lovely to listen to William Butler Yeats’ love poem “When You Are Old,” and it’s a kick to hear Dr. Seuss’ witty exuberance.

 

However, without any discussion or plan, there seems to be a collective theme developing, in which individuals are choosing Hawaiʻi authors, writing about Hawaiʻi. You can tell as they read in these videos, that they’ve settled on excerpts that truly mean something to them. There’s a lot of heart going into this.

 

Nanette Napoleon paused to regain her composure.In fact, one of our citizen readers, Nanette Napoleon , brought her hand to her heart and abruptly stopped reading: “Oh, I’m sorry,” she told our TV studio crew. “I get emotional.” Nanette was reading from an 1893 letter written by Hawai‘i’s last monarch on her last day as monarch (and quoted in Helena G. Allen’s book). Facing a U.S. overthrow of her government, Queen Liliʻuokalani wrote that she was yielding her authority “to avoid any collision of armed forces and perhaps loss of life.”

Left: Nanette Napoleon paused to regain her composure.

Kevin Chang chose a quote in Pidgin English.From the Queen’s English, we go to Pidgin English – a quote from a Waikāne, Windward Oʻahu man in Mark Panek’s book, Big Happiness: The Life and Death of a Modern Hawaiian Warrior. Kahaluʻu nonprofit leader Kevin Chang reads aloud, in part: “Still get mana. Because t’ings can still grow up here. The watah still flowing.”

Right: Kevin Chang chose a quote in Pidgin English.

 

 

Kūhaʻo Zane invoked an ancestral migration to a new land.

Kūhaʻo Zane invoked an ancestral migration to a new land.

 

A brand-new PBS Hawaiʻi Board Member, Hilo’s Kūha‘o Zane, quoted from Ka Honua Ola, by his illustrious auntie, Puanani Kanakaʻole Kanahele, in both English and Hawaiian. We hear of an ancestral canoe journey that came ashore at Nihoa, the island of sheer cliffs 120 miles northwest of Niʻihau.

 

Kamani Kualaʻau conveyed the fisherman’s code.

Kamani Kualaʻau, another PBS Hawaiʻi Board Member, found inspiration in Change We Must, authored by singer Emma Veary’s late mother, Nana Veary. There’s a story about Nana’s mother in shallow coastal waters, catching fish by lifting up her muʻumuʻu like a net. She followed the fisherman’s code: Take only what you need, not what you want.

Left: Kamani Kualaʻau conveyed the fisherman’s code.

These and other video read-alouds appear between TV programs on PBS Hawaiʻi and you can also view the videos on demand at www.pbshawaii.org. And yes, we welcome volunteers!

 

Check out director/editor Todd Fink’s captivating animation of the words. Also, watch for GET CAUGHT READING to visit a public library near you.

 

Aloha Nui,

Leslie signature

 


 

PACIFIC HEARTBEAT SEASON 8
Te Kuhane o te Tupuna (The Spirit of the Ancestors)

PACIFIC HEARTBEAT SEASON 8: Te Kuhane o te Tupuna (The Spirit of the Ancestors)
 
PACIFIC HEARTBEAT

 

The eighth season PACIFIC HEARTBEAT provides viewers with a glimpse of the real Pacific—its people, culture and contemporary issues. From revealing exposés to in-depth profiles and unexpected histories, the anthology series features a diverse array of programs that draws viewers into the heart, mind and soul of Pacific Island culture.

 

Preview

 

Te Kuhane o te Tupuna (The Spirit of the Ancestors)
This documentary film is a journey from Easter Island to London, in search of the lost Moai Hoa Haka Nanaia, a statue of significant cultural importance. It explores the social and political landscape of the island of Rapanui as the people attempt to claim back what is rightfully theirs: their land and a lava-rock image of tremendous presence, representing one of the world’s most extraordinary cosmological views.

 

 

 

JOSEPH ROSENDO’S TRAVELSCOPE
Christmas Celebrations Around the Globe

JOSEPH ROSENDO'S TRAVELSCOPE: Christmas Celebrations Around the Globe

 

Celebrating the world through their festivals is a great way to experience a country and its people. This episode begins in Venice, California at the annual holiday boat parade — a funky and funny celebration along the Venice Canals, which highlights the offbeat, colorful spirit of this Southern California beach community. Then Joseph completes the holiday circle by returning to San Antonio, Texas’ world famous riverwalk and the Lake Geneva region of Switzerland for their Christmas celebration. In Switzerland, Joseph basks in the glow of some of the country’s best Christmas Markets, visits a Christmas ornament artist and takes a journey to old St. Nick’s village. In San Antonio, faith is real and Joseph explores the city’s spiritual roots and the real meaning of Christmas when he joins with San Antonio families in their homes to honor their heritage at the Tamalada – holiday tamale making – and in the San Fernando Cathedral at the midnight Serenada for the Virgin of Guadalupe. In this episode Joseph shows that Christmas is about more than twinkling lights and cups of cheer. In every country, in every culture — Christmas is a time to put aside differences, celebrate our humanity and join the angels in wishing each other Good Will and Peace on Earth.

 

Preview

 

 

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Biography Hawai‘i: Harriet Bouslog

PBS Presents Biography Hawaii: Harriet Bouslog

 

One of a handful of women lawyers practicing in Hawai‘i in the 1940’s and 50’s, Harriet Bouslog became a champion for the working class. With her partner Myer Symonds, she represented the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU), fighting for fair labor laws and wages for the people of Hawai‘i. She was instrumental in ending the death penalty in the Territory of Hawai‘i and her efforts and public comments during the Hawaii Seven trial of alleged Communists led to her disbarment and subsequent reinstatement after a landmark decision by the United States Supreme Court. Brilliant, vivacious, and controversial, Bouslog was one of Hawai‘i’s great defenders of human rights and dignity. This inspiring documentary combines interviews with family and friends, commentary by legal historians and photographs and film that recorded the life and times of this extraordinary woman.

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
The Land of Eb

 

This fictional story is set in the stark volcanic landscape of one of the most remote communities on Hawai‘i Island – Hawaiian Ocean View Estates. Jonithen Jackson portrays Jacob, a Marshallese immigrant father and grandfather, who struggles to provide for his large family. When Jacob overhears a cancer diagnosis from his doctor he keeps the news to himself, forgoing treatment in favor of working to pay off his property which he plans to pass down once he’s gone. Sensing his end, Jacob turns a small video camera on himself and begins to record his story – and that of his people, the Marshallese. The film is a contemplative look at a community in Hawaii still struggling to recover from the effects of the nuclear age. It is a profoundly realistic portrayal of one man’s unwillingness to let go of his dignity and the hope he has for his family’s future.

 

STANDING ON SACRED GROUND
Islands of Sanctuary

 

In this four-part documentary series, native people share ecological wisdom and spiritual reverence while battling a utilitarian view of land in the form of consumer culture and resource extraction as well as competing religions and climate change.

 

Islands of Sanctuary
In Australia’s Northern Territory, Aboriginal clans maintain Indigenous Protected Areas and resist the destructive effects of a mining boom. In Hawaii, ecological and spiritual practices are used to restore the sacred island of Kahoolawe after 50 years of military use as a bombing range.

 

PBS HAWAII PRESENTS
Fishing Pono

 

Native Hawaiians on the island of Molokai are using ancient conservation methods to restore local fisheries. Featuring lifelong fisherman Kelson “Mac” Poepoe, whose fishing conservation program is based on historical practices, this story shows how a community turned the tide on a seemingly doomed resource.