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WASHINGTON WEEK

WASHINGTON WEEK

 

For more than 45 years, Washington Week has been the most intelligent and up to date conversation about the the most important news stories of the week. Washington Week is the longest-running primetime news & public affairs program on television and features a group of journalists participating in roundtable discussions of major news events. Online at pbs.org/washingtonweek or on Twitter @washingtonweek.

 

 

 

RISE UP:
Songs of the Women’s Movement

 

Celebrate the centennial of women’s right to vote through popular music, including performances by Aretha Franklin, Lesley Gore, Helen Reddy, Loretta Lynn, Gloria Gaynor, Dolly Parton, Joan Jett, Cyndi Lauper, Melissa Etheridge, Tina Turner and more.

 

 

 

AMERICAN MASTERS
Fats Domino

 

Discover how Fats Domino’s brand of New Orleans rhythm and blues became rock ‘n’ roll. As popular in the 1950s as Elvis Presley, Domino suffered degradation in the pre-civil rights South, but aided integration through his influential music.

 

 

 

FRONTLINE
The Battle for Hong Kong

 

Inside the battle for Hong Kong, following protesters transformed and radicalized over eight months. The film examines the dramatic struggle in the last corner of China where human rights and freedoms exist but are under threat.

 

 

 

John Lewis
Get in the Way

 

Follow the journey of civil rights hero and human rights champion, U.S. Congressman John Lewis. At the Selma March, Lewis came face-to-face with club-wielding troopers and exemplified non-violence.

 

 

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
The First Rainbow Coalition

 

In 1969, the Chicago Black Panther Party began to form alliances across lines of race and ethnicity with other community-based movements in the city, including the Latino group the Young Lords Organization and the southern whites of the Young Patriots organization. Banding together in one of the most segregated cities in postwar America to collectively confront issues such as police brutality and substandard housing, they called themselves the Rainbow Coalition. By 1973, the coalition had collapsed under the weight of relentless harassment by local and federal law enforcement. Although short-lived, it had an outsize impact: Breaking down barriers between communities, it created a permanent shift in Chicago politics and an organizing model for future activists and politicians across the nation. The First Rainbow Coalition tells the movement’s little-known story through rare archival footage and interviews with former coalition members.

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI
Intellectual Property in the Digital World

 

Every day, people post pictures, videos, songs and other property to social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Many of those posts are shared – and some are used or stolen by a competitor, a rival or someone you don’t even know. What recourse do you have, if any, and what are your rights? Intellectual Property in the Digital World – how do you protect it? Join the discussion on INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI. You can phone in, or leave us a comment on Facebook or Twitter.

 

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The Lavender Scare

 

Learn the untold story of how tens of thousands of homosexual federal workers were either fired or denied employment in the 1950s, stirring outrage in the gay community and starting an LGBTQ rights movement with an unlikely hero at the forefront.

 

 

 

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
Stonewall Uprising

 

“Stonewall Uprising” explores the dramatic event that launched a worldwide rights movement. Told by those who took part, from drag queens and street hustlers to police detectives, journalists and a former mayor of New York, and featuring a rich trove of archival footage, this film revisits a time when homosexual acts were illegal throughout America, and homosexuality itself was seen as a form of mental illness. Hunted and often entrapped by undercover police in their hometowns, gays from around the U.S. began fleeing to New York in search of a sanctuary. Hounded there still by an aggressive police force, they found refuge in a Mafia-run gay bar in Greenwich Village, the Stonewall Inn. When police raided Stonewall on June 28, 1969, gay men and women did something they had not done before: they fought back. As the streets of New York erupted into violent protests and street demonstrations, the collective anger announced that the gay rights movement had arrived.

 

 

 

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