rural

INDEPENDENT LENS
My Country No More

INDEPENDENT LENS: My Country No More

 

Between 2011 and 2016, oil drilling in rural North Dakota reached its peak, setting off a modern-day gold rush in the quiet, tight-knit farm town of Trenton, North Dakota, population less than 1000. With billions of dollars to be gained in an industry-friendly state with a “reasonable regulation” climate, small towns like Trenton became overwhelmed by an influx of workers, and countless acres of farmland were repurposed for industrial development. Through the voices of Trenton’s residents, My Country No More challenges the notion of “progress” and questions the long-term human consequences of short-term approaches to land use, decisions that ultimately affect all Americans, rural and urban alike.

 

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POV
Voices of the Sea

 

Revealing stark realities for the poorest of rural Cubans with unique access and empathy, this is the story of a 30-something mother of four longing for a better life. The tension between wife and aging husband—one desperate to leave, the other content to stay—builds into a high stakes family drama after her brother and the couple’s neighbors escape.

 

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
Look & See: Wendell Berry’s Kentucky

 

Look & See: Wendell Berry’s Kentucky Experience the changing landscapes and shifting values of rural America in the era of industrial agriculture, as seen through the mind’s eye of award-winning writer and farmer Wendell Berry, back home in his native Henry County, Kentucky.

 

 

Our next Indie Lens Pop-Up explores a changing agricultural landscape

 

Please join us for our free Indie Lens Pop-Up screening of the following documentary, ahead of its broadcast debut on Independent Lens:

 

Look & See: Wendell Berry’s Kentucky / By Laura Dunn
Tuesday, April 17, 2018, 5:30-8:00 pm
VENUE CHANGE: Impact Hub Honolulu, 1050 Queen Street, Honolulu

 

Look & See: Wendell Berry’s Kentucky is a portrait of the changing landscapes and shifting values of rural America in the era of industrial agriculture, as seen through the mind’s eye of award-winning writer and farmer Wendell Berry, back home in his native Henry County, Kentucky.

 

We hope you’ll stay after the screening for an informal audience discussion. How has agriculture shaped our way of life in Hawai‘i – and how is that way of life changing?

 

Important Note: Because of our studio preparations for the April 19 live broadcast of KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall, this Indie Lens Pop-Up screening will be held at Impact Hub Honolulu, at 1050 Queen Street in Kaka‘ako. See the graphic below for nearby parking options.

 

 

 

DREAM OF ITALY
Abruzzo

 

Historically, Abruzzo was a rural and poor society somewhat isolated from the rest of the country. This might explain why between 1901 and 1915 alone, a million people emigrated from Abruzzo and neighboring Molise – many to the United States. Thirty percent of Abruzzo is covered by nature reserves and three national parks, helping Abruzzo earn the distinction as the greenest region in Europe. Parco Nazionale d’Abruzzo protects endangered species such as the Marscian Bear and the Appennine Wolf. Although it is Abruzzo’s most populated city, the port of Pescara isn’t the most alluring of destinations. Further inland, the regional capital of L’Aquila is a far more interesting and beautiful place; in fact The Financial Times has called it “the most handsome city in Abruzzo.” Emperor Frederick II founded the town in 1240, supposedly by joining 99 villages together.

 

 

POV
Raising Bertie

 

View an intimate portrait of three African American boys coming of age in rural North Carolina. The young men navigate unemployment, institutional racism, violence, first love, fatherhood and estrangement from family members and mentors.

 

AMERICAN EPIC
Blood and Soil

AMERICAN EPIC: Part 2 of 3: Blood + Soil

 

In America’s rural South, Elder Burch, Charley Patton and others recorded early Delta blues, gospel and protest songs. The Great Flood of 1927 forced those from Mississippi River communities to migrate north, spurring the development of the Chicago blues, led by Howlin’ Wolf.