Sand Island Access Road

PBS Hawaiʻi’s New Home

 

Welcome to PBS Hawaiʻi’s New Home, the Clarence T.C. Ching Campus


Here is PBS Hawaiʻi’s open-concept new home, designed for collaboration, transparency and flexibility.

 

 

In May of 2016, we moved into the two-story building at the corner of Nimitz Highway and Sand Island Access Road in Honolulu. It functions beautifully as a place to create, acquire and distribute stories that matter to the islands that we serve.

 

 

Interior square footage is 30,000 square feet, which includes a large television/multimedia studio and a smaller second studio which doubles as PBS Hawaiʻi’s Board Room. There also is ample, cheerful space in which to hold events and meet with community members.

 

We are ever grateful to the people of Hawaiʻi and others who provided this place where people and ideas come together.

 

Our sincere and heartfelt Mahalo to our supporters, the people of Hawai‘i

 


 

Large Photos of PBS Hawai‘i’s New Home

Images may take time to download.

 

 

 

 

Raising the Bar – The Best Way to Express Our Gratitude

Viewer thank you note

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiMy job is essentially to be a problem-solver. There’s certainly enough to reach for, as the fragmented worlds of media and education require more focus, more engagement, more depth, more context. And in this rapidly changing world, answers are a moving target.

 

But that’s not the toughest part of my job. As in other things in life, the simplest things can be the most difficult. And quite simply, it is very difficult to adequately express thanks.

 

Our unpaid Board of Directors and lean staff could spend most of the day writing thank-you letters or making calls – and it simply wouldn’t be enough to express the gratitude we feel here for what citizens are supporting.

 

After we lost our lease at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, the people of Hawai‘i and several mainland-based charitable foundations with ties to Hawaii gave us more than $30 million to establish a modern stand-alone multimedia center on Nimitz Highway at the entrance to Sand Island, PBS Hawai‘i’s Clarence T.C. Ching Campus. This nonprofit now owns an acre of land and a two-story building, which (thankfully) came in on time and on budget.

 

And still, after building us a new house, some viewers thank us. Here’s an example, from a woman who wrote by hand: “I hope you don’t get tired of my thank-you notes but I gotta say how much it means to me to watch [PBS Hawai‘i].” Here’s another hand-written note: “PBS Hawai‘i is contributing to society. I want PBS to continue this way. That’s why I make my donation.”

 

See what I mean? With a heart full of gratitude, I want you to know that we are dedicated to making the most out of your gift of a new building and your support of programming. We want to raise the bar on our stories and in quality in all areas, including our events for adults and keiki. We want to “be there” for our state – all of it, not just metropolitan Oahu. We want to be trusted for fairness and accuracy. And when we make mistakes, we want to own up and do better. Maybe that’s the best way to convey our thanks.

 

Also, we’re offering all the thousands of building donors a guided tour of the television station. Next month, after we complete technical troubleshooting, install a photovoltaic energy system and add donor signage, we’ll have an opening ceremony. But because of space concerns, we can’t invite all who made the building possible. So we invite NEW HOME donors to arrange a personal tour, now or later, by calling Christina Sumida at (808) 462-5045. Quite simply, we’d like to thank you in person.

 

Mahalo piha,
Leslie signature

 

“Won’t You Be My Neighbor?”
–Mister Rogers

Trolley: Thank you for being our neighbor!

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiYour team at PBS Hawai‘i took a cue from our favorite guy in a sweater, Mister Rogers, and invited scores of neighboring businesses to an open house. After a half-century in Manoa, we’re newbies in a new home across town at Nimitz Highway and Sand Island Access Road. We’re honored to occupy this building created by the people of Hawai‘i.

 

Staff members took individuals and groups on tours through our building, and there was time along the way to stop and get acquainted. “I watched your building going up,” said Curtis Sasaki of next-door office-supplies distributor Conrad Enterprises, a family business. “Thanks for having me over. I’m curious to see the inside, the TV part.” He told us about his own company’s move into the neighborhood, back in 1988, from Kakaako.

 

Our other next-door neighbor is Storage Castle, with the turret wall on Nimitz. The self storage company’s Richard Parry made a good point: “A lot of people think of residential communities when they think of neighbors. But when you think of how much time you spend at work, we need to think of fellow businesses as neighbors and support each other if we can.”

 

We felt terrific support even before we moved in, as the big dog in the ‘hood, Matson, contributed $50,000 to our NEW HOME Campaign.

 

Matson’s affable Gary Nakamatsu motioned to the windows facing Nimitz. “All those drivers go past this area on Nimitz Highway – they just drive right by and they don’t see the great variety of businesses here that do a lot for our state.”

 

Variety, indeed! The Sand Island business district is a crazy quilt of industry and industriousness. Construction companies, candy sales, landscapers, document-shredding, a bakery, garbage collection, balloons, restaurants, dry cleaning, a cement maker, musical instruments. And of course, the Coast Guard. Among organizations that came by to say hi and check out our open, cheerful new work space were Honolulu Disposal Service, McDonald’s, First Hawaiian Bank, New Hope Oahu, Office Pavilion, and a scrappy entrepreneur, Primo Popcorn, owned by the multi-generational Sato family. They’re fearless in translating new flavors to popcorn. Prime rib, end cut? You got it. Kim chee? No problem. Baked potato? Here you go.

 

Each establishment has a story. And of course, we love stories. Our mission is advancing learning and discovery, through multi-media storytelling.

 

We’re glad to add another dash of variety to the neighborhood mix. Thank you, Sand Island area businesses, for being our neighbors.

 

A hui hou kakou—until next time,
Leslie signature