Satoshi Sugiyama

Early HIKI NŌ Students:
Where Are They Now?

 

CEO Message

 

Early HIKI NŌ Students: Where Are They Now?

 

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEOMiddle and high school students from the early days of our HIKI NŌ education initiative and the half-hour TV magazine show are now in their 20s, attending college and entering the job market.

Here’s an update on some of those outstanding HIKI NŌ alums:

Christopher Kim, a former student at Maui Waena Intermediate in KahuluiChristopher Kim was a student at Maui Waena Intermediate in Kahului when he co-hosted the very first edition of HIKI NŌ. A pastor’s kid, he spoke Korean at home with his family. Studying hard to master English words, he emerged as the Hawaiʻi State Spelling Bee Champion; won prestigious college scholarships; and is now a senior at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. Alongside his University studies in computer science, he is a software-development intern at Oracle.

Victoria Cuba, from Waipahu in Central OʻahuVictoria Cuba, from Waipahu in Central O‘ahu, found her way out of homelessness through HIKI NŌ. She shared her personal story, which she had long kept secret, in a HIKI NŌ episode. Her great attitude and strength of character evoked donations from the public and brought scholarships providing college tuition and dormitory housing at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. PBS Hawai‘i employed her throughout college as a student production tech. She did very well at school and work and landed a job as a news producer at ABC affiliate KITV4 Island News in Honolulu.

Kaitlin Arita-Chang, an H.P. Baldwin High graduate from MauiKaitlin Arita-Chang, an H.P. Baldwin High graduate from Maui, earned a college degree at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. and got her foot in the door as a staff assistant at the Capitol Hill office of U.S. Sen. Mazie Hirono. Katie, as her friends call her, explains she was selected from a crush of applicants because of her ability to shoot and produce video for use in video news releases, using skills she learned in HIKI NŌ. Katie has since been promoted to Deputy Communications Director for Sen. Hirono.

Satoshi Sugiyama, a Japanese immigrant and English-as-Satoshi Sugiyama, an English-as-a-Second-Language student at Roosevelt High School in Honolulu, was inspired by his HIKI NŌ experience to major in journalism at Syracuse University in New York. After graduating, he was selected for an internship at the New York Times and is now working as a bilingual reporter for the Japan Times.

We have more HIKI NŌ stand-outs from the early days of the program. If you find yourself worrying about what the future holds when youth are in charge, I suggest that you watch HIKI NŌ at 7:30 pm Thursdays on PBS Hawai‘i television, or anytime online at pbshawaii.org/hikino

 

These students will give you much hope for the future.

 

Aloha Nui,

Leslie signature


 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Hawaiian Value: ‘Imi na’auao

 

This episode is the fourth in a series of six shows in which each episode focuses on a specific Hawaiian value. The Hawaiian value for this show is ‘imi na’auao, or enlightenment and wisdom. Each of the following stories reflects this theme:

 

The top story comes from the students at Moanalua High School in the Salt Lake District of Oahu. They feature Lars Mitsuda, Moanalua’s culinary arts teacher, who combines his passions for food and education by enlightening students on the many life-lessons cooking can teach. From multi-tasking to management skills, to business planning, to working with people, learning culinary arts fosters a wisdom that students can use for the rest of their lives.

 

Also featured are student-created stories from the following schools:

 

Kamehameha School Kapalama (Oahu): This story shows how exploring a tumultuous and traumatic episode from the past can enlighten the next generation on how not to repeat history. Here students at Kamehameha Schools Kapalama study and discuss the Bishop Estate “Broken Trust” controversy that led to positive change and transparency in the trust that manages their schools.

 

Wheeler Middle School (Oahu): Enlightenment and wisdom can come from seeing beyond stereotypes and getting to know people for who they really are. In this story from Wheeler Middle School, a military dependent and a local boy become friends, despite each of their pre-conceived ideas of what the other was “supposed” to be like.

 

Kawananakoa Middle School (Oahu): Veteran boxing coach Joel Kim bestows gems of wisdom onto his young boxing protégés. If experience is the best teacher, then Kim has earned a PhD from the School of Hard Knocks.

 

Konawaena High School (Hawaii Island): Live theatre can be a great tool of enlightenment. Such was the case when a stage adaptation of The Diary of Anne Frank enlightened students on the Kona Coast of Hawaii Island about the persecution of Jews in World War II Europe.

 

Waianae Intermediate School (Oahu): Sometimes the best way to learn about something we know little of is to witness it first-hand. Few middle schoolers have had the experience of knowing someone who is transitioning from the gender they were born with into that of the opposite sex. But when a student at Waianae Intermediate School decided to transition from a boy to a girl, fellow students, teachers, and school administrators became part of a unique process of learning and enlightenment.

 

Roosevelt High School (Oahu): Some teenagers are wise beyond their years. Roosevelt High School student Satoshi Sugiyama learned through observation that in this age of the internet and social media, the most important connections still happen face-to-face…especially over a cup of freshly brewed coffee.

 

This episode is hosted by Kua O Ka La Public Charter School on Hawaii Island.

 

This program encores Saturday, Nov. 7 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, Nov. 8 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.