school

EDUCATION WEEK

 

At PBS Hawai‘i, education is a year-round priority and our mission. On November 7-14, we give particular attention to transformation in American education, including a network of San Diego charter schools that’s already breaking the mold, and a discussion with top local leaders who are charged with taking Hawai‘i’s educational systems into the future.

 

LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX: Ted DintersmithLONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX

Ted Dintersmith 

Tuesday, November 7, 7:30 pm

As a child who played a lot of baseball in rural Virginia, Ted Dintersmith wanted to be a Major League Baseball pitcher. By serendipity, he says, life took him on a completely different path, when he got a job at a high-tech startup. For 25 years, he made a name for himself in the venture capital realm, before leading the charge in America as an advocate for transforming education. He is Executive Producer of the documentary Most Likely to Succeed and a co-author of the book by the same name. In the 2015-16 school year, Dintersmith visited all 50 states to meet with parents, students, educators and politicians, and encouraged communities to work collectively to re-imagine school and its purpose.

 

MOST LIKELY TO SUCCEED

MOST LIKELY TO SUCCEED 

Wednesday, November 8, 8:00 pm

Most Likely to Succeed examines the history of education in the United States and reveals the shortcomings of conventional education in today’s modern world. The documentary also follows students at High Tech High, a network of San Diego charter schools that promotes hands-on, project-based learning, with the goal of producing real-world workforce and life skills.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I 

The Education Leaders of Our State

Thursday, November 9, 8:00 pm

Leadership from Hawai‘i’s major education systems convene around the Insights table for a high-level conversation about how to prepare students for the future employment landscape in the Islands, and how they can work together in doing so.

Scheduled for this conversation:

Phil Bossert

Acting Executive Director

Hawaii Association of Independent Schools

 

Holoua Stender

Executive Vice President of Education

Kamehameha Schools

 

Sione Thompson

Executive Director

State Public Charter School Commission

 

Phyllis Unebasami

Deputy Superintendent

Hawaii Department of Education

 

LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX: Jack Wong

LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX

Livingston “Jack” Wong 

Tuesday, November 14, 7:30 pm

Livingston “Jack” Wong is Chief Executive Officer of Kamehameha Schools, overseeing its significant endowment and educational mission. Kamehameha Schools serves more than 48,000 students across three K-12 campuses, 30 preschools and many community education and scholarship programs. Wong is a graduate of Punahou School – the Kamehameha CEO has said he sometimes gets teased about this. He goes by “Jack” to distinguish himself from his father, a pioneering transplant surgeon in the Islands. Though both of his parents were in medicine, Wong pursued law instead. He joined Kamehameha Schools as its senior legal counsel in 1997.

 


 

POV
Raising Bertie

 

View an intimate portrait of three African American boys coming of age in rural North Carolina. The young men navigate unemployment, institutional racism, violence, first love, fatherhood and estrangement from family members and mentors.

 

POV
Dalya’s Other Country / 4.1 Miles

 

In Dalya’s Other Country, follow a family displaced by the Syrian conflict, walking the line between their Muslim values and the new world they inhabit. Afterward, the short film 4.1 Miles features a Greek Coast Guard captain caught in the middle of the biggest refugee crisis since WWII.

 

4.1 Miles

 

 

 

The National Geographic Bee

The National Geographic Bee

 

The annual National Geographic Bee returns for the 29th consecutive year. The 2017 Bee features fourth-to-eighth-graders vying for the crown and the top prize of a $50,000 college scholarship and lifetime membership in the National Geographic Society.

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
In Football We Trust

 

This insightful and moving documentary transports viewers deep inside the tightly- knit and complex Polynesian community in Salt Lake City, Utah, one of the chief sources for the NFL’s influx of Pacific Islander players. Shot over a four-year period with unprecedented access, the film follows four young Polynesian men striving to overcome gang violence and near poverty through the promise of American football. The film is directed by Tony Vainuku and Erika Cohn.

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
Newtown

 

On December 14, 2012, a disturbed young man committed a horrific mass shooting in Newtown, Connecticut that took the lives of 20 elementary school children and six educators. Filmed over the course of nearly three years, this documentary uses deeply personal testimonies to tell the story of the aftermath of the deadliest mass shooting of schoolchildren in American history. Through raw and heartbreaking interviews with parents, siblings, teachers, doctors and first responders, the film documents a traumatized community still reeling from the senseless killing, fractured by grief but driven by a sense of purpose.

 

Keepers of the Flame: The Cultural Legacy of Three Hawaiian Women (2005)

 

The lives of three extraordinary Hawaiian women, Mary Kawena Pukui, ‘Iolani Luahine and Edith Kanaka‘ole, are chronicled in this film. It shows how, together, they combined their talents and commitment to reignite the flame of tradition in a time when Hawaiian culture was gravely threatened.

 






1 2 3 6