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GROWING BOLDER
Every Day Be a Victory

GROWING BOLDER: Every Day Be a Victory

 

In this episode of Growing Bolder TV: life will present every one of us with challenges, but we can overcome any obstacle when we start Growing Bolder. Meet ordinary people who are extraordinary role models.

 

Tony Handler was living a great life. He was married to the woman of his dreams, raising a family and enjoying every single day. But in an instant, everything changed. Doctors not only told him that he had pancreatic cancer, but they broke the news that he likely only had a few years to live. That was decades ago. And Tony has never given up hope. Despite grueling treatments, experimental drug protocols, surgeries and later, battles with liver, prostate and skin cancer, Tony kept moving. He started to run and that led to competing in triathlons. Tony says that every time he crosses a finish line, he’s beaten Mr. Cancer, and now he’s taking that positive attitude and paying it forward.

 

Other featured stories:

• Doug Ulman: Set Unachievable Goals
• Every Day is a Victory
• The Art of Rebellion
• The Takeaway: Don’t Procrastinate

 

 

The Power of the Hour: Insights on PBS Hawai‘i

 

CEO Message

The Power of the Hour: Insights on PBS Hawai‘i
The Power of the Hour: Insights on PBS Hawai‘i: Pictured, from left: Norm Baker - Aloha United Way Chief Operating Officer; Zi Jun - McKinley High School senior; Connie Mitchell - Institute for Human Services Executive Director; Nani Medeiros - single mother and nonprofit director

Pictured, from left: Norm Baker – Aloha United Way Chief Operating Officer; Zi Jun – McKinley High School senior; Connie Mitchell – Institute for Human Services Executive Director; Nani Medeiros – single mother and nonprofit director

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEOHow many times have you seen or heard something that makes you feel anxious about the future of Hawai‘i? And how many times have you shaken off the thought, as day-to-day life calls you back, with its challenges and pressures? You know that your passing thoughts will return. Your concerns persist.

 

Perhaps that’s one reason why the statewide viewership of Insights on PBS Hawai‘i has doubled in the last two years. For one hour, on Thursday evenings from 8 to 9 pm, we explore one of the quality-of-life issues that are tugging at all of us.

 

The power of the hour is the different perspectives presented. For example, on March 1, our subject was the Islands’ tens of thousands of “working poor.” The Aloha United Way had published a study showing that in 2015-2016, about a third of Hawai‘i’s working households struggled to make ends meet. (An additional 11 percent of Hawai‘i’s households were living in poverty.)

 

I was moved by Insights guest Nani Medeiros, matter-of-fact and thoughtful, as she spoke of being on the high end of the working-poor spectrum. The single mother of a young daughter runs a small nonprofit organization. Born and raised in Hawai‘i and of part-Hawaiian ancestry, Nani never expected to live anywhere else. However, she sees a changing Hawai‘i that she and her daughter may need to leave.

 

“We’re getting by just fine…but there’s never going to be any huge ‘getting ahead’ for us,” she said, “I’m almost 100 percent certain I’ll never be able to buy my own home. Saving for a [down payment] is completely out of grasp.” Last year, she said, her rent increased by $300 a month: “That’s huge.”

 

High school senior Zi Jun said that his immigrant parents live with the stress of debt, even though they work hard to support the family. For all they do to keep the family fed, clothed and housed, they derive precious little time to spend with Zi and his sister.

 

“I see my parents coming home every night, and they’re not happy,” he said.

 

Aloha United Way’s Chief Operating Officer Norm Baker and Connie Mitchell, who leads the Institute for Human Services, pointed out that there’s help available for homeless people who will accept it, but our society is missing a “preventative piece” to keep the working poor from falling into homelessness due to an illness or accident. A short-term subsidy could stabilize a highly vulnerable household and prevent society from incurring higher costs.

 

During Insights’ one hour of live television and live streaming, viewers gain reliable information, and they get an idea of what it’s like to live in someone else’s skin. Different perspectives can yield understanding. We believe a common understanding builds respect – which, in turn, can generate trust and positive action.

 

Insights is currently the second most-watched locally produced program on PBS Hawai‘i (after Nā Mele: Traditions in Hawaiian Song). According to market research, Insights draws men and women viewers in equal numbers and attracts viewers evenly from every household income level from $35,000 to $150,000.

 

Aloha nui,

 

Leslie signature

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #807 – What I Learned

 

Viewers enjoy watching the final, PBS Hawai‘i approved versions of HIKI NŌ stories, but very few have any idea what the students go through to develop their stories to the point where they meet PBS Hawai‘i’s stringent on-air standards. This special episode explores the students’ learning processes by presenting four previously-aired HIKI NŌ stories, followed by behind-the-scenes “What I Learned” mini-documentaries on the experiences of the students who created the stories.

 

The stories featured (along with their corresponding “What I Learned” vignettes) include:

 

–A workspace created by and for students called The Canvas (pictured), from Kalani High School (O‘ahu);

 

–A blind performing arts teacher, from Hongwanji Mission School (O‘ahu);

 

–A Kaua‘i food truck entrepreneur, from Kaua‘i High School;

 

–A Navy-veteran amputee who is learning to live with pain, from Wai‘anae High School (O‘ahu).

 

This special episode is hosted by Kalani High School Senior Anya Carroll and Hongwanji Mission School 7th grader Teo Fukamizu.

 

This program encores Saturday, July 29, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, July 30, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


Easy Yoga: The Secret to Strength and Balance with Peggy Cappy

Easy Yoga: The Secret to Strength and Balance with Peggy Cappy

 

Discover how yoga can aid in the increase of strength and mobility. Peggy Cappy shows how yoga poses can increase range of motion, improve awareness of the body, help prevent bone loss and keep metabolism running efficiently.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
The Caregiver Crisis

What can we do to avoid a caregiver crisis? Most of the 150,000 caregivers in Hawai‘i are women over 50 years old, and many are caring for someone in their 80s. Nearly half have left the workforce to be a caregiver, leaving their financial future at risk. With Hawai‘i’s aging population, the pool of potential caregivers declines so significantly that we are headed for a crisis with each passing year. Families, businesses and our entire island state will be impacted by the economic trend this creates.

 

AARP Hawai’i is hosting a Caregiving Conference on Saturday, March 25th. There will be sessions on planning, long-term care and life insurance, reverse mortgages, Medicaid and other government programs.

 

There will also be tips for improving quality of life at home. Saturday, March 25th, from 8 am until noon at the Japanese Cultural Center.

 

Contact:
1-877-826-8300
aarp.cvent.com/care3-25

 






SHELTER ME:
Hearts & Paws

 

This inspiring series celebrates the human-animal bond by telling positive stories. Each story shows how people’s lives are improved when shelter pets are given a second chance.

 

Host Kristen Bell (Frozen) introduces new stories, including one features award-winning artist Patrick McDonnell, creator of the Mutts comic strip. Patrick spent several days at the New York City animal shelter and turned his experience into a week’s worth of comics called “Shelter Stories.” We also follow the journey of a pet from the day she is surrendered to a shelter until the day she is adopted. Another segment features the first cat cafe in the country. Cat Town Cafe has partnered with the Oakland Animal Shelter to provide an innovative way to showcase cats and boost adoptions in their community.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
What Happens to Hawai‘i Elders Who Don’t Have a Personal Safety Net?

 


Whether it’s job loss, illness, divorce or other life circumstances, some islanders find themselves at wit’s end, running out of money in retirement. What options do they have? And how are Hawai‘i taxpayers affected? What happens to Hawai‘i elders who don’t have a personal safety net?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

HIKI NŌ
Top Story: H.P. Baldwin High School – HC&S (Hawaii Commercial and Sugar) employees

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from H.P. Baldwin High School in Wailuku, Maui present poignant portraits of two long-time HC&S (Hawaii Commercial and Sugar) employees: machinist Wes Bissen and millwright Koa Martin. HC&S is the last remaining sugar mill in Hawaii and will be closing at the end of 2016. The mill opened 144 years ago. The closure will result in 675 employees losing their jobs.

 

Martin’s father and grandfather worked for HC&S before him. Bissen started working at HC&S in 1981. His father was also a machinist for the company. The two reflect on their careers at HC&S and their families’ histories with the company. They also discuss the state funds being allotted to help the laid off workers through the transition. Says Bissen, “You know, it’s sad that they’re going to close, but we’re all big boys. We’ve got to focus on how it’s going to affect everybody and just try to build a better life from here on.”

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

Students from Kapolei High School on Oahu tell the story of their annual basketball event for Best Buddies, a program that helps to integrate students with intellectual and mental disabilities into the social fabric of the school.

 

Students from Aliamanu Middle School in the Salt Lake district of Oahu take us behind the scenes of their school’s nerve center – the front office.

 

Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle introduce us to a surfer- turned-chef who runs the popular Like Poke food truck on Maui.

 

Students from Kapaa Middle School on Kauai tell us about a community organization that feels they have one solution to Kauai’s feral cat problem.

 

And students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului, Maui show us how a married couple is living out its golden years at a Maui senior day care center.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Mililani High School in Central Oahu.

 

This program encores Saturday, July 2 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, July 3 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

SHELTER ME:
New Beginnings

 

This inspiring series celebrates the human-animal bond by telling positive stories. Each story shows how people’s lives are improved when shelter pets are given a second chance.

 

Aimee Sadler’s program is based on the simple concept that dogs love to play. Many shelters keep dogs isolated in their kennels. Aimee shows the shelters how to get groups of dogs in a yard to play and learn from each other. These play groups turn shelters into joyful adoption centers and completely change how shelter dogs are perceived and adopted.

 

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