signal

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI
Red Light Cameras

 

Watch for a while at almost any busy intersection around the state and you’ll see it: a motorist runs the red light. The state is considering a pilot program to install red light cameras to catch violators. How will these cameras work and who will pay for them? Are they necessary? Join the discussion on Red Light Cameras on INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Dangerous Crossings

 

We all know Hawaiʻi is one of the most beautiful places in the country to live, but it is also one of the most dangerous – if you’re a pedestrian. Through mid-November, there have been 36 pedestrian deaths statewide this year, up from 15 last year. How do we save lives?

 

Join us during these live forums by phoning in or by leaving us a comment on Facebook or Twitter. INSIGHTS is also live streamed on pbshawaii.org and PBS Hawaiʻi’s Facebook page.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

To see an archive of past INSIGHTS ELECTION 2018 shows, click here.

 

 

 

 

NOVA
What Are Animals Saying?

 

With an emphasis on provocative and unanswered questions, this series follows researchers on the winding paths of uncertainty and the unknown — and from the mysteries of astrophysics to the technologies that could rival or surpass the abilities of the human mind. On this first episode, follow the clues that reveal how animals “talk” to each other from spider thumps and mice mating songs to the intricate signals between our closest relatives, the chimps.

 

 

Restoring Best Picture Quality

PBS Hawai'i: Restoring Best Picture QualityWe’ll get there. Resilience is in our DNA

 

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiThe people of Hawai‘i bought us a $30 million new home. You provided us a forward-looking physical plant and the stability of property ownership.

 

And, of course, you now expect us to “bring it” with more and more quality content and higher and higher production values. That’s our expectation, too!

 

The last thing you want to see is reduced picture quality on shows that you love.

 

Understood. And yet, you may have experienced intermittent pixelation (that’s when individual pixels in a digitized image stand out) and sporadic, brief audio disruptions, all since PBS Hawai‘i moved into our new home with major, new technology systems.

 

First, I want to apologize to you for the blemishes in your viewing experience. Second, I’d like to explain. Third, I want you to know we have been working constantly, and repeatedly seeking help from network specialists, to eliminate the problems. And fourth, we have reason to believe that a solution is imminent.

 

As I write this, Level 3 Communications is arranging for a larger dedicated fiber circuit to transport our content. Level 3’s service to this local public television station repeatedly fell through the cracks following the telecom giant’s $5.7 billion acquisition of our previous provider, TW Telecom. We experienced critical delays as Level 3 worked to integrate TW Telecom into its fold and laid off staff. Level 3’s challenges in absorbing TW persisted as PBS Hawai‘i relocated to our new building and launched a long-planned transformation of our engineering model.

 

Our new model is something we’re excited about, because it allows us to spend less money to distribute our programming on today’s multiple media platforms – and frees up more resources for quality content. Our new systems rely upon dedicated access to an undersea, overland fiber optic network that runs through a Joint Master Control Center, called Centralcast, in Syracuse, New York. We’re creating programming expressly for Hawai‘i while sharing “back-office” tech costs with our PBS nonprofit peers.

 

Using this data highway shouldn’t have presented roadblocks in the Age of Fiber, but timing is everything: Our contracted fiber provider, TW Telecom, found itself going through a wrenching ownership transition. We sense that the layoffs may have resulted in a loss of institutional knowledge about projects already underway. For three months since our move to our new building, we experienced new owner Level 3’s lack of communication and responsiveness while our picture and audio quality suffered.

 

“This wasn’t managed properly. I don’t know why – we know how to do this. We’ll take care of it,” Level 3’s new Hawai‘i sales director Anthony Compiseno assured us when we met for the first time on August 8. He told us that we’d been assigned an unsuitable network setting – and arranged to test higher bandwidth capability (300mb or megabits per second, versus 200mb on our existing pipe), with a “pseudowire” enhancement to protect our broadcasting content. By the time you read this, our picture quality may already have returned.

 

You and other viewers have gone through this trying time of intermittent broadcast disruptions with us.

 

PBS Hawai‘i sends you our gratitude and aloha, for your patience and your continued faith in our programming.

 

We’ll get there. Resilience is in our DNA.

 

Mahalo piha,
Leslie signature

PBS Hawai'i: Restoring Best Picture Quality

 

The Best of 50s Pop

The Best of 50s Pop

 

This special presents top pop hits of the 1950s by singers and groups who brought songs of love and optimism to listeners glued to their AM radios. These classic tunes and immortal voices bring back those memories with artists such as Patti Page, The Four Lads, Frankie Laine, The Four Aces, Ed Ames, The McGuire Sisters, Gogi Grant and others.

 

Technical Alerts / Info


Current status: There are no technical alerts at this time.


Information

PBS Hawai‘i is committed to providing our viewers a programming experience that is both enjoyable and trouble free. We encourage all our viewers to call us as soon as you experience a technical problem. To assist us in troubleshooting the problem, please be sure to have the following information on hand:

  1. How you receive our signal (cable, satellite, antenna)
  2. Your location
  3. Time of day your issue occurred
  4. Channel on which you receive PBS Hawai‘i
  5. Issues you are experiencing

If you have cable or satellite, you may need to contact your provider and/or check the cable connection to your television.

 

For questions regarding technical issues with our broadcast signal:

Contact during business hours: 808. 462. 5055

After-hours voice messages may be left at: 808. 400. 3842

 

For closed-captioning concerns, please contact our captioning hotline:

Phone: 808. 462. 5000
Neighbor Islands: 800. 238. 4847
Fax: 808. 462. 5090
Email: captioning.hotline@pbshawaii.org

 

We will make every effort to respond or otherwise resolve your inquiry within 24 hours or on the next business day.

 

Written closed-captioning complaints should be directed to the following:

John Nakahira
Chief Engineer
PBS Hawai‘i
315 Sand Island Access Road
Honolulu, HI   96819-2295
Email: jnakahira@pbshawaii.org

 

Before sending a formal written complaint, we recommend you first contact our captioning hotline, listed above. We may be able to resolve your problem immediately without the need for a formal complaint. In any event, we will respond to your complaint within 30 days.