skill

HIKI NŌ
HIKI NŌ Class of 2019, Part Three

 

This is the third of four specials in which outstanding HIKI NŌ graduates from the Class of 2019 (and one student from the Class of 2020) gathered at PBS Hawaiʻi to discuss their HIKI NŌ experiences and how they feel the skills they learned from HIKI NŌ will help them in college, the workplace and life.

 

This episode features Carl Antiado, who graduated from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui and is now a Computer Science and Engineering major at the University of Nevada Reno; Kobie Uyeda, who graduated from Waiākea High School in Hilo and is now a Kinesiology Pre-Med major at Oregon State University; and Brandon Marcos, who graduated from Kauaʻi High School on Kauaʻi and is now majoring in Computer Science at UH Mānoa

 

Each graduate also shows a HIKI NŌ story that they worked on and discusses what they learned from the experience of working on that particular story. Carl shows his story about a band teacher he had who inspired Carl and turned him onto a new perspective on life. Kobie shares her story “Stay Humble, Pray,” about an ex-convict/drug addict who speaks to students about how to avoid bad life choices. Brandon presents his story “Kapaʻa Gridlock,” an investigation into why traffic is so heavy on Kauaʻi.

 

 

 

FAKE OR FORTUNE?
Toulouse-Lautrec

FAKE OR FORTUNE? Toulouse-Lautrec

 

The team investigates four sketchbooks which may be the work of the young French master. Alain Brun is a French psychoanalyst who lives in Bordeaux. He was given the sketchbooks by his grandmother in the 1960s and she always maintained they were the work of Toulouse Lautrec. Alain sent them to the Lautrec committee to see if they could be authenticated. They came back saying that it was actually the work of Lautrec’s tutor, Princeteau. However, Princeteau experts have disputed this – saying they are far too good. The team searches for evidence to see if they can irrefutably link these sketches to the young Lautrec and change the committee’s mind.

 

 

 

FAKE OR FORTUNE?
Giacometti

FAKE OR FORTUNE? Giacometti

 

Twentieth-century sculptures are hot property in the art market. Alberto Giacometti’s Pointing Man figure sold for $141m at auction in New York in 2015, making it the most expensive sculpture ever sold. Could a stark, white square of plaster that has been passed down through an English family with art world connections be one of Giacometti’s earliest and most daring works?

 

 

 

JOSEPH ROSENDO’S TRAVELSCOPE
Cruising Canada: Ottawa and the Rideau Canal

 

The Rideau Canal is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, a popular tourist and recreational attraction and the oldest continuously operating canal system in North America. At every bend along the scenic engineering miracle the traveler is gifted with a world of surprises in its adjacent cities, towns and villages. Joseph begins his Rideau Canal journey in Ottawa where he explores the capital’s diverse neighborhoods, historic landmarks, farmer’s markets and hip restaurants. From the Ottawa Locks he climbs aboard his personal craft and pilots the luxury vessel along the canal’s watery trail on placid waters through thick forests to picturesque communities. He grinds flour in an ancient mill, samples “butter tarts” with the Gingerbread Man, blows glass “witch balls” and helps First Nations craftspeople build a birch bark canoe. From visiting a cannabis factory to dining on maple syrup soaked flapjacks and cranking open the 19th century locks by hand, Joseph’s Rideau Canal adventure pleases the senses and touches the heart.

 

 

 

FAKE OR FORTUNE?
A Double Whodunnit

FAKE OR FORTUNE? A Double Whodunnit

 

Fiona Bruce and Philip Mould investigate two rare portraits of black British subjects from the 18th and 19th centuries. Painted with extraordinary skill and sophistication, both pieces of art are highly unusual in their positive depiction of black sitters at a time when Britain was still heavily engaged in slavery. But this is also an intriguing double whodunnit. Who are the artists who broke with the conventions of the time to paint these exceptional works?

 

 

 

GOOD WORK
Masters of the Building Arts

GOOD WORK: Masters of the Building Arts

 

Celebrate American craftsmanship and the unsung artisans – stone carvers, stained glass artisans, metalsmiths, plasterers, stone masons, decorative painters and adobe workers – who create and preserve iconic buildings.

 

Preview

 

 

 

SKINDIGENOUS
Samoa – Peter Suluaʻpe

 

Western Samoa is one of the few places on the planet where traditional tattooing continued unimpeded through the colonial era. Sua Peter Suluaʻpe is a contemporary master of the craft. With his father and brothers, he works out of a cultural village in the heart of Apia, the Samoan capital. The Suluaʻpes are one of only two Samoan families who are authorized by tradition to create tattoos in accordance with ancient custom. Embracing their role, they carry on a sacred practice whose origins lie in legend, and which continues to shape the character of Samoa today.

 

SKINDIGENOUS - Samoa: Peter Suluʻape

 

 

 

SKINDIGENOUS
Toronto – Jay Soule

 

Jay Soule is a multidisciplinary artist known as “Chippewar” in the Indigenous community. His internationally-recognized work expresses much of the angst of today’s Indigenous population in Canada. Adopted at five years of age, Jay was taken from his birth mother and grew up outside his home community. He is considered part of the “Sixties Scoop,” a period in which Indigenous children were removed from their families and assimilated into non-Indigenous households. As a teenager, Jay left his home and opted for a life on the street. For a few years, he lived among the street kids of Toronto, eventually finding refuge in one of the city’s Indigenous shelters.

 

 

 

SKINDIGENOUS
Prince Ruppert – Nakkita Trimble

 

Nakkita Trimble is the only tattoo artist from the Nisga’a Nation. Along with elders from her community, she hopes to revive the traditional process of tattooing known as gihlee’e. Ts’iksna’aḵs—the tattoos—were usually composed of crests, known as ayukws, and of adaawaḵs, which are stories, legends and history. She plans to teach someone else the art of the Nisga’a tattoing so that more people can reconnect with this ancient practice.

 

 

 

SKINDIGENOUS
Mexico – Samuel Olman

 

The ancient city of Palenque was once a hub of Mayan civilization. For centuries after its decline, it lay hidden under layers of tropical vegetation, until modern archaeologists peeled back the jungle to reveal it to the world in the last century. Today, Palenque is both an cultural centre and a sacred site. It was here that Indigenous artist Samuel Olman chose to set up his traditional Mayan tattoo practice. Living in the heart of the jungle near the ancient ruins, Samuel heads up the Olman Project, which aims to revive the art, knowledge and wisdom of Mesoamerican tattooing, while adapting it to the modern world.

 

 

 

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