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HIKI NŌ
Episode #1005 – Breaking Gender Norms and other stories

 

TOP STORY

 

“Breaking Gender Norms”
Students from McKinley High School on O‘ahu introduce us to their school’s quarterback, who happens to be a female. On August 19, 2017, McKinley sophomore Alexandria Buchanan became the first female varsity quarterback to start a game in Hawai‘i. She recounts her progress from playing on the junior varsity team as a freshman to becoming the starting quarterback on the varsity team. “I’m proud I got this far,” says Buchanan, “I never expected to be on the varsity level, let alone starting as their quarterback. I take a lot of pride in it. I take a lot of pride in having my team and my coaches trust in me.” McKinley’s football coach and its athletic director also discuss how more and more females have been playing football in recent years, challenging the old perception that it is a sport strictly for men.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

–Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului, Maui, introduce us to a female intermediate school student who inspires younger students to embrace the wonders of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math).

 

–Students from Kapa‘a High School on Kaua‘i give us an inside look at their school’s building construction class.

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu shine a spotlight on a downtown-Honolulu arts organization: The Arts at Marks Garage.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui High School introduce us to a young woman who has created a program that helps other young women build self-confidence and separate their sense of self-worth from social media.

 

–Students from Waimea High School on Kaua‘i present a profile in courage: a young girl who defeated cancer and gained strength and ambition from the experience.

 

 

 

FRONTLINE
The Facebook Dilemma, Part 1 of 2

FRONTLINE: The Facebook Dilemma, Part 1 of 2

 

FRONTLINE details the early warnings about Facebook’s impact on privacy and democracy in the U.S. and around the world. Original interviews and rare footage show how the company faced claims of misuse while becoming an unprecedented global power.

 

Preview

 

 

 

FRONTLINE
The Facebook Dilemma, Part 2 of 2

 

FRONTLINE examines Facebook’s response to charges that it promotes “fake news” and disrupts American politics. Included: the company’s role sowing division worldwide; and the challenges that face the social media platform.

 

 

A Concern About Hawaiians Leaving Hawai‘i

 

CEO Message

A Concern About Hawaiians Leaving Hawai‘i
Left image: Community Advisor Dr. Shawn Kana‘iaupuni, left. Right image: Community Advisory Chair Karen Knudsen with fellow member Les Murashige

Left image: Community Advisor Dr. Shawn Kana‘iaupuni, left. Right image: Community Advisory Chair Karen Knudsen with fellow member Les Murashige

Community Advisors pictured, from left: Cheryl Ka‘uhane Lupenui (Hawai‘i Island), Les Murashige, Dennis Bunda, Kainoa Horcajo (Maui), Marissa Sandblom (Kaua‘i) and Dr. Shawn Kana‘iaupuni. Not pictured: Chuck Boller, Lei Kihoi (Hawai‘i Island) and Corrina Moefu.

Community Advisors pictured, from left: Cheryl Ka‘uhane Lupenui (Hawai‘i Island), Les Murashige, Dennis Bunda, Kainoa Horcajo (Maui), Marissa Sandblom (Kaua‘i) and Dr. Shawn Kana‘iaupuni. Not pictured: Chuck Boller, Lei Kihoi (Hawai‘i Island) and Corrina Moefu.


Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEOBesides our statewide, governing Board of Directors, PBS Hawai‘i has a Community Advisory Board, with all of Hawai‘i’s counties represented, to give us feedback about programming and other community engagement.

 

At a recent meeting, these Community Advisors shared thoughts about the central question of our April 19 KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall: “How do we keep Hawai‘i, Hawai‘i? One theme of the discussion was concern about Native Hawaiians choosing to move out of state.

 

Dr. Shawn Kana‘iaupuni of Honolulu says there are research initiatives to measure the current outflow of Native Hawaiians. “That’s our host culture,” she noted.

 

Cheryl Ka‘uhane Lupenui of North Hawai‘i Island mentioned that community changes are affecting a school which uses a curriculum based on the Hawaiian culture. This curriculum is deemed less relevant to the needs of new students.

 

Maui’s Kainoa Horcajo said that newcomers and visitors are using social media to confer new names on treasured places, resulting in a “homogenization” of Hawai‘i.

 

All of the advisors counseled PBS Hawai‘i staff not to worry if the Town Hall turns dour. They pointed out that change is inevitable, and mindfulness is a positive first step if we want to keep Hawai‘i, Hawai‘i.

 

More to come on this subject…Aloha nui,

 

Leslie signature

 

 

FRONT AND CENTER
Shawn Mendes

 

Singer/songwriter Shawn Mendes performs at the Melrose Ballroom in New York City. Mendes first came into the public eye as a popular user of the social media platform Vine and at only 18 years old, became one of only six artists to have two No. 1 albums on the Billboard Top 200 all-genre chart at such a young age. Mendes performs some of his hits including “Treat You Better,” “Stitches” and “Mercy.”

 

Ask This Old House – Live Q&A

 

A leaky faucet or tricky kitchen reno got you stumped? Richard Trethewey and Tom Silva from Ask This Old House will be with us live on Thursday, February 9 at noon HST. At that time, visit PBS Hawai‘i’s Facebook page or here on pbshawaii.org to view the live stream to ask your questions.

 

 

More incumbents sitting out debates?

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I: The set of INSIGHTS

 

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiGeneral Managers of PBS stations across the country met last month for a strategy session, looking at what kind of programming is needed most in our country, and how to make the content more responsive and more interactive.

 

And in this election year of deep divisions and negativity, we compared notes on our television stations’ political debates and other forums. Longtime station managers remarked that they’d never seen so many local incumbents decline to appear with their challengers on live telecasts and live web streams.

 

“These incumbents have the money to create their own messages through advertising, and that’s what they’re doing instead,” said Tom Axtell, the head of Vegas PBS and a member of the PBS Board of Directors. Another GM noted that many candidates no longer feel obligated to appear alongside their competition because they can speak to the public through low-cost social media.

 

In Hawai‘i, we had our share of incumbents turning down participation in our weekly election forum on Insights on PBS Hawai‘i, noting scheduling conflicts. We know that candidates are busy, so we generally ask them early. And we realize that incumbents may not be terribly motivated to let their lesser-known competitors receive statewide air time.

 

In addition, incumbents from 34 Hawai‘i State House and Senate races faced no opposition from another major-party candidate.

 

We even had a challenger withdraw from a General Election forum. That was Honolulu Mayoral candidate and political veteran Charles Djou. His campaign contended that it had never committed to the forum. (Before the Primary Election, Djou did take part in our forum with incumbent Mayor Kirk Caldwell and former Mayor Peter Carlisle.)

 

The rebuffs by candidates in some major races had a silver lining, freeing up TV time for district races, especially outside Honolulu and beyond O‘ahu. Incumbents and challengers with different ideas sat down at the same table, engaging in some interesting, vigorous and respectful discussions.

 

Viewers could feel the fresh breeze of democracy. At its best, this civil discourse provided much-needed substance and helped voters make their choice at the polls.

 

As Communications Professor John Hart of Hawai‘i Pacific University commented in a Honolulu Civil Beat podcast with reporter Chad Blair last October 10: “I still believe [debates] are our best chance to see past the pseudo-events, the slick advertisements. When you hear someone talk for an hour, you get a sense of who they are.”

 

This public media organization wants to thank all of the election candidates who accepted our invitation to inform voters by answering viewer questions and taking part in civil discourse on Insights on PBS Hawai‘i.

 

A hui hou (until next time)…
Leslie signature

 

 

Growing Up Gambling

 

This program illustrates how technology advancement makes it easy for students to engage in high-stakes gambling, taking viewers inside the brain of an online gamer and online gambler, telling the story of a student’s downward spiral into addictive online sports betting.

 

POV
Point and Shoot

 

Matt VanDyke was a recent college grad with a love of video games and action movies when he decided to embark on a “crash course in manhood.” With a motorcycle and a video camera, he set off on a life-changing 35,000-mile odyssey across North Africa and the Middle East that led to his participation in the 2011 Libyan revolution against Muammar Gaddafi and six-month imprisonment in Libya.

 

As VanDyke worked to reshape himself, he also helped create a stunning portrait of how the ever-present cameras in our “selfie society” not only record our lives, but also craft who we become.

 

Drawing from more than 100 hours of VanDyke’s videos, director Marshal Curry, with full creative independence in the making of the documentary, has created a riveting film that asks thorny questions about manhood, personal risk and the nature of war in the era of social media.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hosted by Island School, Lihue

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Island School from Lihue, Kauai.

 

Top Story:
Kealakehe High School on Hawaii Island presents a story about students from their school and from Iolani School on Oahu who were selected to participate in a once-in-a-lifetime science project that will send NASA’s dust shield technology to the moon. These robotics students, called MoonRIDERS (Research Investigating Dust Expulsion & Removal Systems), will work with the Pacific International Space Center for Exploration Systems in hands-on experiments testing the capabilities of NASA’s EDS (Electrodynamic Dust Shield). Students will build a mock up lunar lander spacecraft, fabricate the actual flight frame for the mission, mount the EDS on it, install a camera and design a lunar re-duster, then test the entire system on the lower slopes of Mauna Kea to see how well it will remove dust off of the camera lens.

 

Also Featured:
Students at Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauai visit Hanapepe Nights, a popular art, music and food festival in Kauai’s biggest little town. Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle tell the story of a husband and wife who left their careers as mechanical engineers to farm the very colorful, exotic dragon fruit on Maui. Students from McKinley High School on Oahu profile their school’s cross-country team captain, Hidemasa Vincent Mitsui, who was deemed ineligible to compete during his senior year because he had to repeat the 9th grade when he moved from Japan to Hawaii (OIA rules state that a 5th year student is ineligible to participate in high school sports). Even though he was not able to compete, Vincent inspired his teammates to do their very best and was eventually reinstated when his coach and athletic director appealed to the OIA.

 

Students at Iolani School on Oahu take us behind the scenes with the Iolani Hackers, a group of students and faculty members who create elaborate visual pranks meant to surprise and delight people on campus. Students at Saint Francis School on Oahu introduce us to Isabel Villanueva, the state air riflery champion who excels at the sport despite the fact that she lives with a rare medical condition – linear scleroderma – which causes her physical pain while participating in the sport. Students at Wheeler Middle School on Oahu show us how to stay safe on the internet by using proper social media etiquette and guidelines.

 

This program encores Saturday, May 2 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, May 3 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.