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HIKI NŌ
#1014 – Top Stories from the Winter Quarter of the 2018-2019 School Year

HIKI NŌ #1014 – Top stories from the Winter Quarter of the 2018-2019 school year

 

This compilation show features some of the top stories from the Winter Quarter of the 2018-2019 school year:

 

–Students from Maui High School in Kahului introduce us to Maui High robotics captain John Fabella. John’s mother passed away when he was just seven years of age, and his father was deported. Growing up without his biological parents, John found an extended family in his Maui Waena Intermediate School robotics team and later, in the Maui High School team.

 

Program

 

–Students from Wai‘anae High School on tell the story of a female wrestler who used to be teased and bullied about her weight, and lost the pounds to regain her self-esteem.

 

–Students from Kalāheo High School in Windward O‘ahu focus on the importance of taking responsibility while driving. Their story is framed by the recent traffic fatalities in the Kaka‘ako neighborhood of O‘ahu and how that tragedy sparked a family’s memories of losing their daughter in a drunk driving incident.

 

–Students from Hawai‘i Preparatory Academy Middle School in the Waimea district of Hawai‘i Island show us the proper way to saddle a horse.

 

–Students from Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu feature two cancer survivors who battled with their diseases at a very early age: Lily Mallory, who was undergoing treatment for her cancer at the age of three, and Emi Robison, who was battling leukemia at the age of seven.

 

–Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i introduce us to Mike Coots, a surfer and photographer from Kīlauea, Kaua‘i, who lost his leg in a shark attack and now, ironically, works to protect sharks against the ravages of the shark fin soup industry.

 

–Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului feature a food truck owner who starts a pay-it-forward campaign to help feed workers affected by the recent federal government shutdown.

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu introduce us to figure skater and Moanalua High School senior Kyra Fukumoto. While Hawai‘i has only one ice skating rink, and its resources for training figure skaters is very limited compared to the Mainland, Kyra is adamant about being based out of her home state. She is very proud of being from Hawai‘i and looks forward to representing the islands in her career as a figure skater.

 

This special episode is hosted by Tyler Bright, a 2018 HIKI NŌ graduate from Wai‘anae High School on O‘ahu who is currently studying biology at Chaminade University in Honolulu, with hopes of becoming either a canine rehabilitation therapist or a physical therapist.

 

 

 

 

FAMILY INGREDIENTS
Puerto Rico – Arroz con Gandules

 

Part foodie, part travelogue, part genealogy, Family Ingredients follows acclaimed Hawai‘i restaurateur and sustainability hero Ed Kenney, as he meets with different individuals in the Islands, and follows each person’s cherished food memory to its origin around the globe. He takes off to explore Okinawa, Tahiti, California, Japan, Puerto Rico and the Hawaiian Islands, showcasing how cuisine can profoundly unite cultures, communities and families.

 

Puerto Rico – Arroz con Gandules
Puerto Rican pride thrives in Hawaiʻi. Ed Kenney meets up with entertainer Tiara Hernandez, whose family grew up in Waikiki showrooms. They follow a culinary path to a country she’s never seen to learn more about her heritage.

 

 

FAMILY INGREDIENTS
Japan – Miso Soup

 

Part foodie, part travelogue, part genealogy, Family Ingredients follows acclaimed Hawaiʻi restaurateur and sustainability hero Ed Kenney, as he meets with different individuals in the Islands, and follows each person’s cherished food memory to its origin around the globe. He takes off to explore Okinawa, Tahiti, California, Japan, Puerto Rico and the Hawaiian Islands, showcasing how cuisine can profoundly unite cultures, communities and families.

 

Japan – Miso Soup
In Japan, miso factories are like microbreweries in America. Host Ed Kenney and fellow Hawai‘i restaurateur Alan Wong dive into the origins of miso soup, Wong’s favorite childhood dish, and search for the finest ingredients.

 

 

MOVEABLE FEAST WITH FINE COOKING
Livorno, Italy

 

In the port city of Livorno, host Pete Evans is joined in Italy by two chef-authors with US roots: Bryan Voltaggio, who visits from Maryland, and Pamela Sheldon Johns, who has called Tuscany home for over 20 years. Seasonal, local and traditional flavors have inspired this seaside episode of Moveable Feast with Fine Cooking; first, Pete visits Prosciutto di Parma to learn about this geographically-protected delicacy. Then, he meets up with Bryan and Pamela to tour the city’s Venetian-style canals and browse the 19th-century style Mercato Centrale for local produce. From the regional classic cacciucco, a tomato-based seafood stew, to a flavorful bordatino, a bean and polenta soup, this feast embodies the spirit of Livorno in its unpretentious character and coastal integrity.

 

 

MOVEABLE FEAST WITH FINE COOKING
Seattle Washington

 

Explore the Pacific Northwest as Moveable Feast with Fine Cooking travels to Seattle to get a taste of some of the freshest food on the west coast. Host Curtis Stone travels by seaplane to Coupeville with Chef Tom Douglas, winner of three James Beard Awards, and Chef Renee Erickson, a major driving force in the food boom of Seattle. First stop: a visit to Penn Cove to see where mussels grow in the best environment in the region. He then meets Georgie Smith of Willowood Farms, one of the most photographed, painted and otherwise admired farmscapes in the Pacific Northwest. The chefs get together to create a feast that highlights the fresh mussels from Penn Cove and vegetables that benefit from Washington’s rich soil, in recipes such as a delicious spiced mussels and saffron soup followed by grilled salmon with Walla Walla onions and fava leaves.

 

THE MIND OF A CHEF
Noodles

 

Join executive producer and narrator Anthony Bourdain as he takes viewers inside the mind of noted Korean American chef and restaurateur David Chang, a New York Times best-selling author and chef-owner of the Momofuku restaurant group. Chang brings a voracious appetite for food knowledge and a youthful exuberance to cooking and travel, whether cooking in his kitchens in New York and Australia or traveling for inspiration to Japan, Denmark, Spain or Montreal.

 

Noodle
David Chang makes instant ramen dishes and tsukemen. He travels to Japan for a bowl of the original tsukemen and visits a noodle factory. Food scientist Harold McGee explains alkalinity and its role in ramen.

 

 

 

Martha Speaks

 

Martha Speaks is an animated series on PBS KIDS. Aimed at viewers between the ages of four and seven, Martha’s educational goal is to teach kids new words.

 

Based on the children’s book series by Susan Meddaugh and published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, the series stars Martha, a beloved family dog. She is accidentally fed alphabet soup — this gives her the power of speech and the chance to speak her mind to anyone that will listen.

 

With two stories in each episode, kids will get to know Martha as an outspoken, honest, smart, confident dog who loves to eat (and talk!). They will also meet the rest of Martha’s family and friends. Ten-year-old Helen is Martha’s best friend. Martha encourages the shy, artistic Helen to be more outgoing and brave. Helen acts as the voice of reason for Martha. It’s a relationship any dog, or pet-lover, can appreciate.

 

The series is supported by an educational outreach campaign that includes a cross-age reading buddy program. The show is Closed Captioned and described for the visually impaired. It’s produced by WGBH Boston and Vancouver’s Studio B Productions.

 

Learning Goals

The goal of Martha Speaks is to increase oral vocabulary, the words we use when we talk. The shows are not trying to teach kids how to read. They are designed to help kids understand what words mean when they hear them; words likeretrievesprout, and crave. Vocabulary is one thing that predicts if children will be good readers. Once they are in school and they see these words, children will need to know what they mean. If children have heard the words before, that familiarity will help them as they learn to read. Martha Speaks is designed to teach up to 20 words in each show. And how better to get kids excited about learning and trying out new words than with a talking dog, who just can’t stop talking?!