steps

Latest KĀKOU Town Hall Hits a Nerve

 

CEO Message

Latest KĀKOU Town Hall Hits a Nerve
KĀKOU Town Hall Guests: Māhealani Perez-Wendt, Mike Irish and Aaron Salā

KĀKOU Town Hall Guests: Māhealani Perez-Wendt, Mike Irish and Aaron Salā

 

We did something a little different at the second KĀKOU Town Hall, televised and streamed live for two hours on PBS Hawai‘i April 19.

 

Mostly, we let the conversation unfold naturally. This wasn’t a shout-‘em-down event; it was a respectful Hawai‘i discussion in which people from different backgrounds and perspectives mulled quality-of-life answers.

 

Our topic was The Global Squeeze: How Do We Keep Hawai‘i Hawai‘i? Thirty-eight thoughtful invitees gathered, 16 of them Neighbor Islanders.

 

Participants were quick to point out that many residents, especially Native Hawaiians, are feeling that they need to leave Hawai‘i, as they weigh earnings against sky-high housing prices and a heavy burden of state and local taxes. Some characterized tourism as a perpetual engine that is running unchecked.

 

Back row, from left: Hank Adaniya, Rob Stephenson, Edward Wendt, Māhealani Perez-Wendt, Keoni Lee, Lori McCarney, Kealoha Hooper, Sabra Kauka, Mike Irish, Maenette Benham, Puna Dawson, Kepa Maly, Jan Harada, Tom Raffipiy, T. Ilihia Gionson, Corie Tanida, David DeRauf, Danny Goya and Peter Adler. Middle row: Denise Laitinen, Kit Zulueta, Mark Doo, Jon Osorio, Mike Buck, Kainoa Horcajo, Marlene Booth, Aaron Salā, Candy Suiso, Mark Suiso, Daphne Barbee-Wooten, Jay Fidell, Olin Lagon and Ekela Crozier. Front row: Jennifer Suzuki, Leslie Wilcox, Rebecca Meyer, Eric Enos, Skylark Rossetti and Craig Takamine.

Back row, from left: Hank Adaniya, Rob Stephenson, Edward Wendt, Māhealani Perez-Wendt, Keoni Lee, Lori McCarney, Kealoha Hooper, Sabra Kauka, Mike Irish, Maenette Benham, Puna Dawson, Kepa Maly, Jan Harada, Tom Raffipiy, T. Ilihia Gionson, Corie Tanida, David DeRauf, Danny Goya and Peter Adler. Middle row: Denise Laitinen, Kit Zulueta, Mark Doo, Jon Osorio, Mike Buck, Kainoa Horcajo, Marlene Booth, Aaron Salā, Candy Suiso, Mark Suiso, Daphne Barbee-Wooten, Jay Fidell, Olin Lagon and Ekela Crozier. Front row: Jennifer Suzuki, Leslie Wilcox, Rebecca Meyer, Eric Enos, Skylark Rossetti and Craig Takamine.

 

A high school junior, Rebecca Meyer, expects to move away. She noted that she’s never visited some special places on her home island of O‘ahu, because tourists are overrunning them.

 

The Dean of the UH Hawai‘inuiākea School of Hawaiian Knowledge, Dr. Jon Osorio, said, “We need to have political and economic change if Hawaiians are going to stay here. And honestly, if Hawaiians disappear from here, it isn’t Hawai‘i anymore.”

 

Dr. Maenette Benham, UH-West O‘ahu Chancellor, said that what keeps Hawai‘i Hawai‘i is the cultural values that young people hold in their na‘au, or gut, and how they use them as a driving force to uplift community.

 

Jay Fidell reminded everyone that cost-of-living anxiety dates back decades. “How do you convert that into recognizing the sea change and doing something about it?”

 

T. Ilihia Gionson of Kona said a good next step is voting in the upcoming election for a worthy candidate – “and if you don’t see one, maybe it’s supposed to be you.”

 

Māhealani Perez-Wendt of Hana, Maui, prefaced her answer by saying it’s “sensitive” and usually not discussed “in mixed company” – meaning Native Hawaiians and non-Native Hawaiians.

 

“What I hear in this room is a sense of resignation,” she said. She advocates Hawaiian sovereignty as an “agenda of survival.”

 

Her husband, taro farmer Ed Wendt, agreed: “This is deep, deeper than you think.”

 

A younger Hawaiian by a generation, Keoni Lee, offered that sovereignty should be viewed by non-Hawaiians as an opportunity, not a threat, as Native Hawaiians can lead the way in sustainability practices that once made their homeland flourish.

 

Maui’s Kainoa Horcajo preferred to call this “home rule” rather than sovereignty. He said, “It’s not just a kānaka thing, it’s a kākou thing…That is the way we truly solve all of these problems.”

 

Peter Adler, a professional in conflict resolution, listened intently during the program but chose not to speak. He told me later: “In certain settings, a shut mouth gathers no foot.”

 

You can find this discussion online at pbshawaii.org. Look for our next KĀKOU Town Hall this fall.

 

Aloha nui,

Leslie signature

Leslie Wilcox
President and CEO
PBS Hawai‘i

 

 

KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall
The Global Squeeze: How Do We Keep Hawaiʻi Hawaiʻi?

 

In our second live town hall, we pause to consider where we are, and where we want to be. Change is inevitable. Some changes come quietly, incrementally, over years; others seem to emerge all of a sudden and nearly full-blown. How is Hawai‘i changing – for better, for worse, or both?

 

This is not a conversation about major controversial events that have been dividing our community. This is not a conversation about pro-this, or anti-that. This is a discussion about the finer details of life in Hawai‘i that affect our sense of place. What details compromise the core essence of Hawai‘i – and where are we willing to draw the line?

 

We’ve invited 40 individuals from across the state to participate in this frank, respectful and community-based discussion in our studio. We invite you to join the conversation through email and social media, using the hashtag #pbskakou. You can watch the live broadcast on PBS Hawai‘i, or the live stream on pbshawaii.org and PBS Hawai‘i’s Facebook page.

 


<< Return to the KĀKOU home page.

 

 



Teacher Resources

 

Visit the HIKI NŌ Curriculum Website

Download the HIKI NŌ Curriculum Alignment Document

Click to view in your browser or alt/option click or right click to save file to download.

Download the HIKI NŌ Curriculum PDF Version

 


HIKI NŌ RESOURCES AND TUTORIALS


 

1. HIKI NŌ PARTICIPANT RELEASE FORM
Students producing the video: Complete and submit the HIKI NŌ Participant Release Form.

 

HIKI NŌ TECHNICAL SPECS
2. For Camera

 

3. For Editing

 

4. Complete the appropriate pitch sheet:
HIKI NŌ SEASON 10 STORY PITCH SHEET
HIKI NŌ SEASON 10 PROFILE PITCH SHEET
HIKI NŌ SEASON 10 HOW-TO PITCH SHEET

 

5. FRAMING AN INTERVIEW (2:44)
This tutorial covers the “do’s and don’ts” of framing an interview subject.

(by Lawrence E. Pacheco)

 

6. PROPER AUDIO LEVELS (1:26)
A basic understanding of proper audio levels and the difference between analog and digital levels.

(by Lawrence E. Pacheco)

 

7. AUDIO NOISE (3:35)
Do you think you can determine what noise is in your audio? Find out.

(by Lawrence E. Pacheco)

 

8. SCRIPT TEMPLATE AND SAMPLE SCRIPT

 

9. STORY PREMISE (4:23)
Discover how a ‘story premise’ can help you in shaping your personal profile story.

(by Robert Pennybacker)

 

10. 5-POINT OUTLINE (4:48)
Find out how creating a 5-Point Story Outline can help make a successful HIKI NŌ story.

(by Robert Pennybacker)

 

11. SHOOTING A SEQUENCE (9:32)
Learn how to best shoot and utilize a video b-roll sequence in your story.
(Edited by Akane Kashiwazaki and narrated by Robert Pennybacker)

 

12. PACING (7:08)
This tutorial explains how to better pace your edits to achieve the proper mood and emotion for your story.

(by Robert Pennybacker)

 

13. STANDARD OUTCUE (2:27)
Learn what a HIKI NŌ Standard Outcue is and why it’s important.

(by Lawrence E. Pacheco)

 

14. UPLOADING YOUR FINAL STORY (2:48)
Is your story approved for air on HIKI NŌ? Then here’s how and where to upload it!

(Narrated by Kelsea Gines of Saint Francis School)

 

15. HIKI NŌ SUPERS & CREDITS LIST
Your last step is to complete the supers and credits form and select a still photo of your crew to run with the credits.

 

16. HOW TO SHOOT A HOST SEGMENT THAT HAS NO B-ROLL (4:49)
In this tutorial we will go over how to shoot a host segment using only an on-camera host with no B-roll.

(Narrated by Nikki Miyamoto)