stereotype

WOMEN, WAR & PEACE II
A Journey of a Thousand Miles: Peacekeepers

WOMEN, WAR & PEACE: A Journey of a Thousand Miles: Peacekeepers

 

Embark on a risky yearlong U.N. peacekeeping mission into earthquake-ravaged Haiti with an all-female Bangladeshi police unit. Leaving their families behind, these police officers shatter stereotypes as they rise in the name of building peace.

 

Preview

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Hawaiian Value: ‘Imi na’auao

 

This episode is the fourth in a series of six shows in which each episode focuses on a specific Hawaiian value. The Hawaiian value for this show is ‘imi na’auao, or enlightenment and wisdom. Each of the following stories reflects this theme:

 

The top story comes from the students at Moanalua High School in the Salt Lake District of Oahu. They feature Lars Mitsuda, Moanalua’s culinary arts teacher, who combines his passions for food and education by enlightening students on the many life-lessons cooking can teach. From multi-tasking to management skills, to business planning, to working with people, learning culinary arts fosters a wisdom that students can use for the rest of their lives.

 

Also featured are student-created stories from the following schools:

 

Kamehameha School Kapalama (Oahu): This story shows how exploring a tumultuous and traumatic episode from the past can enlighten the next generation on how not to repeat history. Here students at Kamehameha Schools Kapalama study and discuss the Bishop Estate “Broken Trust” controversy that led to positive change and transparency in the trust that manages their schools.

 

Wheeler Middle School (Oahu): Enlightenment and wisdom can come from seeing beyond stereotypes and getting to know people for who they really are. In this story from Wheeler Middle School, a military dependent and a local boy become friends, despite each of their pre-conceived ideas of what the other was “supposed” to be like.

 

Kawananakoa Middle School (Oahu): Veteran boxing coach Joel Kim bestows gems of wisdom onto his young boxing protégés. If experience is the best teacher, then Kim has earned a PhD from the School of Hard Knocks.

 

Konawaena High School (Hawaii Island): Live theatre can be a great tool of enlightenment. Such was the case when a stage adaptation of The Diary of Anne Frank enlightened students on the Kona Coast of Hawaii Island about the persecution of Jews in World War II Europe.

 

Waianae Intermediate School (Oahu): Sometimes the best way to learn about something we know little of is to witness it first-hand. Few middle schoolers have had the experience of knowing someone who is transitioning from the gender they were born with into that of the opposite sex. But when a student at Waianae Intermediate School decided to transition from a boy to a girl, fellow students, teachers, and school administrators became part of a unique process of learning and enlightenment.

 

Roosevelt High School (Oahu): Some teenagers are wise beyond their years. Roosevelt High School student Satoshi Sugiyama learned through observation that in this age of the internet and social media, the most important connections still happen face-to-face…especially over a cup of freshly brewed coffee.

 

This episode is hosted by Kua O Ka La Public Charter School on Hawaii Island.

 

This program encores Saturday, Nov. 7 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, Nov. 8 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hosted by McKinley High School

 

TOP STORY:
Students from Kapaa High School on Kauai tell the story of Joshua and Jason Iloreta, two brothers who train and compete together in long-distance running races. To most people his does not seem unusual, until they find out that older brother Joshua has cerebral palsy – a neurological disorder that appears in infancy or early childhood and permanently affects body movement and muscle coordination. Jason pushes Joshua in a race-designed wheelchair as he runs. Their goal is to someday do a full marathon together. Their participation in long-distance races is part of an awareness campaign the brothers started which they call “I Am My Ability, I Am Not My Disability.” Their intent is to spread awareness that cerebral palsy does not impair people’s cognition and intelligence and that they can lead fulfilling and productive lives with the condition.

 

ALSO FEATURED:
Students from Waianae Intermediate School in Central Oahu tell the story of Lorenzo Taguro-Bear, a very outgoing young leader who, unbeknownst to his peers and advisors at the Boys and Girls Club of Hawaii, used to live in a homeless encampment in Waianae.

 

Students from Kapaa Middle School on Kauai present a primer on how to make friends.

 

Students at the private all-girl school Sacred Hearts Academy in Kaimuki feature their science teacher Erin Flynn, who inspires her students to shatter the stereotype that science is for boys.

 

Expanding on the theme of breaking gender-based stereotypes, we revisit a story from the HIKI NŌ archives by Aliamanu Middle School on Oahu about a girls’ flight school.

 

Students from Seabury Hall Middle School on Maui feature John Plunkett, who tells the heartfelt story of his family’s deep connection to their homeland of Kihei, Maui.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by McKinley High School.

 

This program encores Saturday, March 5 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, March 6 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
The Homestretch

 

This film follows three homeless teens as they fight to stay in school, graduate, and build a future. Each of these smart, ambitious youths – Roque, Kasey, and Anthony – will surprise, inspire, and challenge audiences to rethink stereotypes of homelessness as they work to complete their education while facing the trauma of being alone and abandoned at an early age. While told through a personal perspective, their stories connect with larger issues of poverty, race, juvenile justice, immigration, foster care, and LGBTQ rights.

With unprecedented access into Chicago public schools, The Night Ministry “Crib” emergency youth shelter, and Teen Living Programs’ Belfort House, the documentary follows these kids as they move through the milestones of high school while navigating a landscape of couch hopping, emergency shelters, transitional homes, street families and a school system on the front lines of the homelessness crisis. It examines the struggles these youth face in obtaining a high school level education, and then follows them beyond graduation to focus on the crucial transition when the structure of school vanishes, and homeless youth often struggle to find the support and community they need to survive and be independent. The film is a powerful, original perspective on what it means to be young and homeless in America today, while building a future.