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PBS Hawai‘i names Jody Shiroma as Vice President of Communications

PBS HAWAI‘I – News Release

315 Sand Island Access Rd.| p: 808.462.5000| pbshawaii.org
Honolulu, HI 96819-2295| f: 808.462.5090

 

For questions regarding this press release, contact:
Jody Shiroma
jshiroma@pbshawaii.org
808.462.5026­

 

February 7, 2019

 

Download this Press Release

 

Jody Shiroma, Vice President, Communications

 

(Honolulu, HI)—PBS Hawai‘i’s new Vice President of Communications is Jody Shiroma, who will increase opportunities for community access, engagement and partnerships, and oversee the expansion of the multimedia station’s community advisory groups across the islands.

 

Shiroma brings more than 16 years of experience of professional experience, most recently serving as Aloha United Way’s Vice President of Marketing and Communications for 12 years. Prior to that, she was Editor-in-Chief for Sassy and G Magazine, a local youth publication with over 25,000 in distribution.

 

Jody grew up in Hawai‘i and is a graduate of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa with a Bachelor’s Degree in Journalism with an emphasis in Ethnic Studies. She is a recipient of numerous business awards, including the Hawai‘i Kai Jaycees’ Outstanding Young Person of the Year, Pacific Business News’ 40 under 40, Pacific Business News’ Women Who Mean Business, and the FBI Honolulu Division Director of Community Leadership Award. She served as a United Way Fellow in 2013.

 


PBS Hawai‘i is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization and Hawai‘i’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i to the world. pbshawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii


 

 

Early HIKI NŌ Students:
Where Are They Now?

 

CEO Message

 

Early HIKI NŌ Students: Where Are They Now?

 

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEOMiddle and high school students from the early days of our HIKI NŌ education initiative and the half-hour TV magazine show are now in their 20s, attending college and entering the job market.

Here’s an update on some of those outstanding HIKI NŌ alums:

Christopher Kim, a former student at Maui Waena Intermediate in KahuluiChristopher Kim was a student at Maui Waena Intermediate in Kahului when he co-hosted the very first edition of HIKI NŌ. A pastor’s kid, he spoke Korean at home with his family. Studying hard to master English words, he emerged as the Hawaiʻi State Spelling Bee Champion; won prestigious college scholarships; and is now a senior at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. Alongside his University studies in computer science, he is a software-development intern at Oracle.

Victoria Cuba, from Waipahu in Central OʻahuVictoria Cuba, from Waipahu in Central O‘ahu, found her way out of homelessness through HIKI NŌ. She shared her personal story, which she had long kept secret, in a HIKI NŌ episode. Her great attitude and strength of character evoked donations from the public and brought scholarships providing college tuition and dormitory housing at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. PBS Hawai‘i employed her throughout college as a student production tech. She did very well at school and work and landed a job as a news producer at ABC affiliate KITV4 Island News in Honolulu.

Kaitlin Arita-Chang, an H.P. Baldwin High graduate from MauiKaitlin Arita-Chang, an H.P. Baldwin High graduate from Maui, earned a college degree at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. and got her foot in the door as a staff assistant at the Capitol Hill office of U.S. Sen. Mazie Hirono. Katie, as her friends call her, explains she was selected from a crush of applicants because of her ability to shoot and produce video for use in video news releases, using skills she learned in HIKI NŌ. Katie has since been promoted to Deputy Communications Director for Sen. Hirono.

Satoshi Sugiyama, a Japanese immigrant and English-as-Satoshi Sugiyama, an English-as-a-Second-Language student at Roosevelt High School in Honolulu, was inspired by his HIKI NŌ experience to major in journalism at Syracuse University in New York. After graduating, he was selected for an internship at the New York Times and is now working as a bilingual reporter for the Japan Times.

We have more HIKI NŌ stand-outs from the early days of the program. If you find yourself worrying about what the future holds when youth are in charge, I suggest that you watch HIKI NŌ at 7:30 pm Thursdays on PBS Hawai‘i television, or anytime online at pbshawaii.org/hikino

 

These students will give you much hope for the future.

 

Aloha Nui,

Leslie signature


 

 

 

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Volatile Earth: Volcano on Fire

 

In the Democratic Republic of the Congo, climb up the cone of Nyiragongo, one of the world’s least studied volcanoes. Join volcanologists as they descend into its crater, down toward its bubbling and seething lava lake, to try to discover when it will erupt next.

 

 

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Natural Born Rebels: Hunger Wars

 

From a promiscuous prairie dog to a kleptomaniac crab and an alpha chimpanzee who reigns with an iron fist, this three-part miniseries explores the most rebellious animals in the natural world. But are these creatures really breaking bad? Across the world, new studies are uncovering an astonishing variety of insubordinate animal behaviors, and despite how it appears on the surface, researchers are discovering the complex and fascinating science behind why these animals behave the way they do. In fact, being a rebel could be the key to success in the wild.

 

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