table

Distancing While Convening … in This Time of COVID-19

 

CEO Message

 

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO

We’re all still absorbing the many ways that life has changed since COVID-19 broke into our vocabulary as a double-whammy threat to personal health and the economy.

 

Here’s just one way: The fast-changing seating configurations on our live editions of INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I. Week by week, the program morphed – from an in-person gathering place to a mostly virtual meeting.

 

For decades, the program’s centerpiece was a single table around which the host and guests took seats.

 

The evolution of the INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I seating arrangement: The original one-table set-up, from February; the “V” configuration, from March 19; the individual tables, with one guest via computer screen, from April 16

The evolution of the INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I seating arrangement: The original one-table set-up, from February.

Left: The “V” configuration, from March 19. Right: The individual tables, with one guest via computer screen, from April 16.

 

Then, with new guidelines about social distancing, PBS Hawai‘i TV studio crewmembers carried away the familiar table and placed it in storage. Out came two long tables, with a guest seated at each end, and the moderator in between at a smaller table.

 

Also gone were the small microphones, called lavaliers, that our production crew would clip to participants’ lapels or collars. Instead, to avoid physical contact, the crew rounded up desktop microphone stands, which had mostly fallen into disuse.

 

The following week, more tables appeared, all small – and every participant, host and guests, had his or her own table.

 

Meantime, our production team worked hard to keep a safe environment by disinfecting surfaces.

 

By then, COVID-19 had become the program’s ongoing subject, with discussions reviewing and reflecting on how Hawai‘i is dealing with this devastating situation, how we can do better, and what’s next.

 

Our regular volunteers at the phone bank followed government guidelines and sheltered at home. Staffers at this “essential” media operation replaced the volunteers.

 

However, when forum guests were given the option of participating in person or virtually, most still wanted to be physically present. Pictured above: the guests on April 16, with only State Schools Superintendent Dr. Christina Kishimoto appearing by way of a computer screen.

 

The following week (after the printing deadline for this publication), all guests= were scheduled to appear by way of the Internet: the Mayors of four Hawai‘i counties.

 

So, over these fast-moving weeks of community changes tied to COVID-19, our INSIGHTS program went mostly virtual.

 

And no matter where guests are seated, INSIGHTS is still bringing together participants and perspectives. The program continues to live up to its goal, which is:

 

Convening diverse voices in a trusted space for greater community knowledge and understanding.

 

Aloha nui and be well,

Leslie signature

 

 

 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW
Hotel del Coronado, Part 2 of 3

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW: Hotel del Coronado, Part 2 of 3

 

Discover covetable California items appraised at Hotel del Coronado like a 1915 San Diego Exposition poster, a Joan Crawford archive from around 1940 and a Margaret Bourke-White photograph of Gandhi. Guess which is valued at $40,000-$50,000.

 

Preview

 

 

 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW
Hotel del Coronado, Part 1 of 3

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW: Hotel del Coronado, Part 1 of 3

Katy Kane (left) appraises a Fortuny Delphos gown, ca. 1920, at Hotel del Coronado in Coronado, Calif.PHOTO CREDIT: PHOTO BY LUKE CRAFTON FOR WGBH, (C) WGBH 2018

 

Check into Hotel del Coronado to see sensational ROADSHOW finds at a stunning seaside setting, such as a 1962 Baldessari oil “Sign for Rothko & Albers,” a Fortuny Delphos gown, and a “Kitchen Debate” table with a signed Nixon photo. Which is $90,000?

 

Preview

 

 

 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW
Ca’ D’zan, Part 3 of 3

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW: Ca' D'zan, Part 3 of 3

 

There’s no clowning around when it comes to capturing showstopping appraisals at the Ringlings’ Sarasota mansion. Highlights include a Nakashima table, a Yankees ring and illustrated baseball, and an Elijah Pierce relief-carved plaque.

 

Preview

 

 

 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW
Rapid City, SD, Part 3 of 3

 

Finds from the Roadshow floor include a 1760s Chester County Pennsylvania spice chest, two sets of Frank Lloyd Wright blueprints, and a Tiffany desk lamp valued at $4,000-$6,000.

 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW
Seattle, WA, Part 1 of 3

 

Highlights from the Roadshow floor include a Vladimir Kagan desk used by Kagan himself and an impressive 1874 Francis A. Silva oil painting valued at $250,000.

 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW
Rapid City, SD, Part 1 of 3

 

The Roadshow visits one of South Dakota’s greatest treasures, Mount Rushmore National Memorial, to look at presidential prints. Some notable finds in Rapid City include a suite of furniture by Thomas Molesworth from the famous “Ranch A,” and signed military documents of Elvis Presley, valued at $4,000-$5,500.

 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW
Rapid City, SD, Part 2 of 3

 

The Roadshow hits the open road to visit the Sturgis Motorcycle Museum & Hall of Fame, located in the town famous for its annual motorcycle rally. Highlights from the Roadshow floor include TWA travel posters; a 1932 signed photograph of the national treasure, Mount Rushmore; and a Rock-Ola juke box valued at $2,000-$3,000.

 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW
Cincinnati, OH, Part 3 of 3

 

Highlights from the Roadshow floor include: a trophy from the 1908 Belmont Stakes; an early 20th-century toy horse and buggy; a French advertising poster; and a bust of Abraham Lincoln, valued at $5,000-$7, 000.

 

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