taro

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 914 – Top Story: The Many Faces of Hope

 

This week’s episode of HIKI NŌ spotlights seven of the most outstanding stories from the winter quarter of the 2017-2018 school year. The seven selected stories also share a common theme: hope. The island residents featured in this show each express personal hopes for themselves, their families and their communities. Each one is on a mission to turn that hope into reality.

 

THE STORIES:

–Students from Hongwanji Mission School on O‘ahu go off-the-air with Billy V, a local media celebrity who opens up about the physical and emotional journey that’s accompanied his cancer treatment. Billy V expresses his hope to recover from cancer and continue his fulfilling life and work.

 

–Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu go aboard the Hōkūle‘a voyaging canoe to show us how the current crew is teaching ancient navigation techniques to a new generation. In this story, Master Navigator Nainoa Thompson shares his hope that younger Hawaiians will take up the Polynesian Voyaging Society’s mission of perpetuating traditional voyaging and the spirit of exploration.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School take us to Noho‘ana Farm in Waikapū to meet a man who is preserving his heritage and his culture by restoring his family’s ancient taro farm. He hopes to share his knowledge and instill a sense of kuleana in younger Hawaiians so they can continue the tradition of kalo farming into the future.

 

–Students from Konawaena High School on the Big Island relay the inspirational story of a teacher who hiked the Pacific Crest Trail – from Mexico to Canada – as part of her recovery from the trauma of sexual assault. She hopes this challenge will help her take back control of her body and her life.

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu show us how a high school athlete hopes to overcome his short stature to pursue his dream of playing varsity soccer.

 

–Students from Waiākea High School in Hilo on the Big Island introduce us to a man who’s spreading his motto: “Stay Humble, Pray.” This former prisoner visits Hawai‘i high schools to share his story of drug addiction in the hope of persuading students not to make the mistakes he made.

 

–Students from Maui High School in Kahului introduce us to a family learning to embrace what life brings after their baby is born with the genetic disorder known as Down Syndrome. The Garcias of Pukalani hope their love and devotion will guarantee their daughter’s happiness. And they hope to share their blessings and inspire their neighbors through their family company, Aloha Kettlecorn.

 

This special edition of HIKI NŌ is hosted by two students from Farrington High School on O‘ahu: 9th grader Shaylen Tatupu-Timu and 10th grader Harvey Saucedo.

 

 


HIKI NŌ
Episode # 913: 2018 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge

 

On Friday January 26, 2018, student teams from twenty middle and high schools took on the 2018 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge. The students had four days to conceptualize, shoot, write, record voiceovers for, and edit a story expressing the theme “A Special Place.” Teachers were allowed to make suggestions to their students, but they were not allowed to provide any hands-on help (no shooting, sound recording, writing, or editing). The theme was announced at the beginning of the four-day challenge, so no pre-planning was possible before then.

 

Eight of the best stories from the challenge will be featured:

 

–“Shige’s Saimin Stand” by Moanalua High School (O‘ahu)

Inspired by childhood memories of his grandparent’s saimin stand in Haleiwa, Ross Shigeoka opened Shige’s Saimin Stand twenty-eight years ago in Wahiawa. It has since developed into a home for members of the community to gather and carry out the traditions of enjoying Shige’s homemade saimin and hamburgers. What started out as a business has become a focal point for families from Wahiawa and beyond.

 

–“Taro Farming” by Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School (Maui)

Hōkūao Pellegrino of Nohū‘ano Farms dedicates his life to restoring ancient taro patches that his family began cultivating in Waikapū, Maui back in the 16th century. He hosts approximately one thousand students every year to teach them about the relevance of kalo in the Hawaiian culture and how to mālama (care for) the natural resources that provide for this important crop.

 

–“Cafeteria” by Nānākuli High and Intermediate School (O‘ahu)

The story of how the cafeteria at Nānākuli High and Intermediate School doubles as the home of the Nānākuli Performing Arts Company (NPAC), an organization that transforms lives by providing a sense of family, self-esteem and pride for its performers, mentors, alumni and audience members.

 

–“A Special Piece of Home” by Kaua‘i High School (Kaua‘i)

A personal essay featuring a high school graduate about to head off to college on the mainland who reflects on the things she will miss about her island home of Kaua‘i.

 

–“Volcanoes National Park” by Volcano School of Arts & Science (Hawai‘i Island)

A young man talks about the stories of Hawaiian gods and goddesses he has learned at Volcanoes National Park, which has sparked his curiosity to learn more about the Hawaiian culture. He also reflects on the incredible natural beauty he has experienced at the park, particularly around Halema‘uma‘u Crater.

 

–“Agnes’ Portuguese Bake Shop” by Kalaheo High School (O‘ahu)

Agnes’ Portuguese Bake Shop has been a Kailua gathering place for forty-seven years. Longtime patrons reminisce about what the bake shop has meant to them as, sadly, it prepares to close its doors for good.

 

–“Affordable Housing” by Maui Waena Intermediate School (Maui)

The Lokahi Foundation, a non-profit housing and community development organization, has just completed a development of affordable homes in the Happy Valley area of Wailuku, Maui. As the new homeowners move in, these individual “special places” come together to form a neighborhood of people bound together by the shared desire to create safe, happy homes for their families.

(Middle School winner of the 2018 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge)

 

–“Teen Parent Center” by Maui High School (Maui)

While attending Baldwin High School, fifteen year-old Jada Apolo became a teen mother. The responsibilities of motherhood made continuing high school close to impossible, until she transferred to Maui High School, one of three public schools in Hawai‘i to offer on-campus childcare and a teen parent program. This enabled Jada to continue with high school, but a recent spike in the number of incoming freshman caused a shortage of resources that threatened to close Maui High’s teen parent program. Jada launched a community awareness/support campaign that she hopes will lead to funding for an alternative teen parent program for her and other teen moms in the area.

(High School winner of the 2018 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge)

 

PACIFIC HEARTBEAT
Sons of Hālawa

 

Feel the pulse of the pacific – the stories of its people, cultures, languages, music and contemporary issues – in Season 5 of PACIFIC HEARTBEAT, the nationally distributed series from Pacific Islanders in Communications and PBS Hawai‘i. The five films in this season highlight struggles, values and victories that draw us together and make our Pacific cultures unique.

 

Sons of Hālawa
Pilipo Solatorio of Molokai is the last to hold the cultural traditions, music and stories of a sacred valley that has been home to his family for hundreds of years. This is an intimate portrait of Solatorio’s search for a successor – before generations of knowledge will be lost forever.

 

HIKI NŌ
Focus on Compassion: Kūpuna

 

The first of four Focus on Compassion HIKI NŌ episodes drawn from the archives compiles stories that center on the topic of kūpuna, or elders. This show is hosted by Crystal Cebedo, a 2016 HIKI NŌ and Wai‘anae High School graduate who is currently attending Menlo College in Atherton, California on a full scholarship. In this episode, the stories highlight the compassion we feel towards our elders or the compassion our kūpuna show us.

 

The outstanding HIKI NŌ stories in this Focus on Compassion show include:

 

–“Elder-Student Talk” from Aliamanu Middle School on O‘ahu: a look at the wisdom shared by The Elders, a group of former global leaders, to Hawaii’s youth and young adults at the Pillars of Peace Conference.

 

–“Papa Fu” from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i: the story of a 101-year old man and the lessons he’s learned and shares from his long life.

 

–“Taro Farmer” from Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i: the story of Kinichi Ishikawa, a 98-year-old 442nd Regimental Combat Team veteran and a life-long farmer, who continues to work the land and mentor the next generation of farmers.

 

–“Scam Story” from Kainalu Elementary School on O‘ahu: a cautionary tale of how senior citizens can fall prey to scam artists and advice on how people can avoid this kind of financial exploitation.

 

–“Remember What’s Important” from Wai‘anae High School on O‘ahu: a look at how a family is drawn together in their creative and compassionate efforts to care for the family matriarch who has dementia.

 

–“Adult Day Care” from Maui Waena Intermediate School on Maui: a feature on how the Maui Adult Day Care Center addresses the needs of the senior population with a staff committed to the nurture, vitality and personalized care of its clients.

 

–“Losing a Parent” from Hilo High School on Hawai‘i Island: the story of how the love of her grandparents helped stabilize one high school student’s life despite the loss of a parent.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 9, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 10, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

MOVEABLE FEAST WITH FINE COOKING
The Big Island, Hawai‘i

 

This series combines flavorful ingredients, top chefs and beautiful locations for the ultimate dining experience. In the third season of the Emmy-nominated series, Australian Chef Pete Evans goes coast-to-coast, and across the sea, traveling to Nashville, Louisville, Miami, San Antonio, Hawaii and other US locations to meet the best chefs in each area and cook a delicious meal that incorporates local and seasonal ingredients.

 

Big Island, Hawaii
“The Pied Piper of Hawaii Regional Cuisine,” Chef Peter Merriman takes Pete on a trip up the Kohala Mountains to the beautiful Kahua Ranch where they pick up Wagyu beef for the night’s feast. Meanwhile, local chef Jim Babian sources abalone straight from the tank at the Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaii. Later, the chefs meet up at Merriman’s Restaurant to prepare wood-grilled abalone; pipikaula beef jerky poke; pan-seared kampachi with lilikoi brown butter sauce; and lamb curry with fresh ginger, turmeric, coconut and pineapple-mint garnish.

 

MOVEABLE FEAST WITH FINE COOKING
Maui, Hawai‘i

 

This series combines flavorful ingredients, top chefs and beautiful locations for the ultimate dining experience. In the third season of the Emmy-nominated series, Australian Chef Pete Evans goes coast-to-coast, and across the sea, traveling to Nashville, Louisville, Miami, San Antonio, Hawai‘i and other US locations to meet the best chefs in each area and cook a delicious meal that incorporates local and seasonal ingredients.

 

Maui, Hawai‘i
Pete explores, cooks and dines with two of the island’s excellent chefs, 2014 Maui Chef of the Year Isaac Bancaco, and founder of the mobile kitchen Maui Fresh Streatery Kyle Kawakami. The adventure starts with some off–shore fishing. Back on shore the team prepares a modern take on a traditional Maui feast at the spectacular Noho‘ana Farm known for its taro and poi.

 

MOVEABLE FEAST WITH FINE COOKING
O‘ahu, Hawai‘i

 

This series combines flavorful ingredients, top chefs and beautiful locations for the ultimate dining experience. In the third season of the Emmy-nominated series, Australian Chef Pete Evans goes coast-to-coast, and across the sea, traveling to Nashville, Louisville, Miami, San Antonio, Hawaii and other US locations to meet the best chefs in each area and cook a delicious meal that incorporates local and seasonal ingredients.

 

Oahu, Hawaii
Chef Pete Evans joins award-winning Hawaiian chefs Jon Matsubara and Lee Anne Wong on Oahu to learn how local pineapple is harvested. They also meet local fish guru/mentor Brooks Takenaka at the Honolulu Fish Auction to bid and buy locally sourced fish for dinner. Chef Jon shows how to make his famous smoking mai tai cocktail, hibachi-style Kauai shrimp, and Kahaluu roast pork belly, while Lee Anne cooks up fresh opah and vegetable sides and Pete prepares ahi poke.

 

 

SIMPLY MING
Hawai‘i – Lee Ann Wong

SIMPLY MING: Hawai‘i - Ed Kenney

 

Chef Ming Tsai adventures on Maui with Chef Lee Anne Wong, then heads to Kako‘o ‘Oiwi farm in He‘eia, O‘ahu where the chefs gather traditional Hawaiian ingredients, such as taro plants, edible ferns and breadfruit. In the kitchen, Ming and Lee Anne create a sumptuous meal celebrating the heritage of the islands.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hosted by Waipahu High School on Oahu

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is being hosted by Waipahu High School on Oahu.

 

Top Story:
Students from Seabury Hall Middle School on Maui profile Kathryn Peterson, who has volunteered to help in the training of assistance dogs since she was 10 years old. The Seabury Hall senior is passionate about the service that assistance dogs provide for people with disabilities, enabling them to lead more independent and fulfilling lives.

 

Also Featured:
Students from Ka Waihona o ka Naauao Public Charter School on Oahu share the story of their school principal, Alvin Parker, who served as a crewmember on the Aotearoa (New Zealand) leg of Hokulea’s World Wide Voyage, helping to promote the message of malama honua, or caring for the Earth; students from Kapaa High School on Kauai capture the lively activities that abound at their town’s monthly street fair; students from Kamehameha Schools Kapalama High School on Oahu feature Imiah Tafaovale, a Kamehameha sophomore who finds a convenient way to forgo the long school commutes that were robbing her of sleep; students from Konawaena High School on Hawaii Island document the creation of a community mural that showcases the cultural values of West Hawaii; students from Hawaii Preparatory Academy on Hawaii Island tell the story of Thomas “Tom Tom” Pahio, a Waipio taro farmer whose loi, or taro patches, serve both as an outdoor classroom for students and as test beds for taro varieties that can resist new environmental threats.

 

PACIFIC HEARTBEAT
Nā Loea: The Masters

 

Meet two men who are considered masters in Hawaiian culture: Keone Nunes, a kumu hula (teacher of hula) and master of traditional kakau (tattooing), and Ed Wendt, a pioneer in the taro restoration movement who has helped to re-establish the water rights for all traditional farmers in east Maui.

 

 

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