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INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Election 2018 Recap

 

Hotly contested primaries for governor, congress, the state legislature, county councils and mayoral races in two counties have set the stage for the 2018 General Election on November 6. Two days after, INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I will present a recap of the 2018 elections.

 

Join us during these live forums by phoning in or by leaving us a comment on Facebook or Twitter. INSIGHTS is also live streamed on pbshawaii.org and PBS Hawaiʻi’s Facebook page.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

To see an archive of past INSIGHTS ELECTION 2018 shows, click here.

 

 


 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
U.S. Senate / Maui County Council – Kahului

 

Our last INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I before the General Election features two candidate forums:

 

–At 8:00 pm, it’s the race for U.S. Senate. Mazie Hirono (D) has captured national and local attention with her criticism of President Trump and of his appointee to the Supreme Court, Brett Kavanaugh. She is trying for a second consecutive six-year term as Hawaii’s junior senator. Challenging her re-election effort is Republican Ron Curtis, a retired engineer who beat seven competitors in the primary election.

 

–At 8:30 pm, Maui’s outgoing mayor Alan Arakawa may face a tall order in trying to win back the Maui County Council – Kahului seat he once held against Natalie Kama, who was the top vote getter in the primary.

 

Join us during these live forums by phoning in or by leaving us a comment on Facebook or Twitter. INSIGHTS is also live streamed on pbshawaii.org and PBS Hawaiʻi’s Facebook page.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

To see an archive of past INSIGHTS ELECTION 2018 shows, click here.

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
State House District 36 / Hawai‘i County Council District 7

 

This week’s INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I features two candidate forums:

 

–At 8:00 pm, it’s the race for State House District 36, covering Mililani and Mililani Mauka on O‘ahu. With no incumbent, voters must choose between Republican Val Okimoto, a political newcomer, and veteran Democrat Marilyn Lee, who previously represented the area for 16 years.

 

–At 8:30 pm, political newcomers Kelly Drysdale and Rebecca Villegas are in a runoff for the Hawai‘i County Council District 7 seat, representing parts of North and South Kona.

 

Join us during our live discussion by phoning in, or leaving us a comment on Facebook or Twitter. INSIGHTS is also live streamed on pbshawaii.org and Facebook Live.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

To see an archive of past INSIGHTS ELECTION 2018 shows, click here.

 

 

 

“Comfort Women” – A Twisted Euphemism

 

CEO Message

“Comfort Women” – A Twisted Euphemism
LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX: Nora Okja Keller

Honolulu’s Nora Okja Keller, author of the acclaimed novel Comfort Woman

 

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEOI remember exactly what I said some three decades ago to a Honolulu news colleague, when we first heard the expression “comfort women” and learned what it meant.

 

“How twisted is that?” I said. “A truly deceptive term to hide horrendous brutality against the powerless.”

 

Of course, that’s what euphemisms do. They mask unpleasantness; they blunt the horror.

 

This euphemism refers to young women of little means, mostly teenagers, forced into sexual slavery by the Imperial Japanese Army during the Sino-Japanese War and World War II. In filthy conditions, they were required to sexually service 20, 30, sometimes 50 Japanese soldiers a day.

 

They endured beatings, infection, disease and abortions. Most died.

 

At the end of World War II, survivors felt so much shame that many didn’t go home. They sought new lives and didn’t speak of their ordeal. One former captive was Keum-Ju Hwang, of South Korea, who finally resolved to tell her story before she died. She spoke in 1993 at a University of Hawai‘i symposium – and Honolulu resident Nora Okja Keller was in that audience.

 

Keller, born in Seoul and of half Korean ancestry, felt a “burden of history” and embarked on a journey of research and writing. The result was a critically acclaimed first novel, Comfort Woman. She recalled that before she heard Ms. Hwang’s account, she was only aware of scenes in Korean soap operas: “There’d be this mysterious woman, veiled in black, going through the background. And the reference would be, ‘Oh…do you see that woman? Something bad happened to her during the war.’”

 

PBS Hawai‘i will air an encore of my 2008 Long Story Short conversation with Nora Okja Keller on Tuesday, October 16, the week before our October 22 premiere of a POV film, The Apology, which follows three survivors – from China, the Philippines and South Korea. (See interview with the filmmaker on pages 4-5 of our October Program Guide.)

 

Keller’s inspiration, Ms. Hwang, died in 2013, knowing she had done her part to let the world understand her soul-scarring but freeing truth.

Aloha nui,

Leslie signature


 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Honolulu City Council, District 4, Honolulu City Council, District 8

 

This week, INSIGHTS features two Honolulu City Council races:

 

–At 8:00 pm, Honolulu City Councilman Trevor Ozawa is facing challenger Tommy Waters, as he seeks to keep the seat representing District 4, covering East Honolulu from Hawai‘i Kai to Waikīkī. In 2014, Ozawa beat Waters by just 41 votes.

 

–At 8:30 pm, City Councilman Brandon Elefante is also trying for a second term, against challenger Kelly Kitashima. The two are running in District 8, for the seat representing Aiea, Pearl City and Waipahu.

 

Join us during our live discussion by phoning in, or leaving us a comment on Facebook or Twitter. INSIGHTS is also live streamed on pbshawaii.org and Facebook Live.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

To see an archive of past INSIGHTS ELECTION 2018 shows, click here.

 

 



 

PBS NewsHour
State of the Union Address

 

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump will deliver his annual State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress on Jan. 30.

 

Join us on Tuesday, January 30th at 4:00 pm for PBS NewsHour’s coverage of President Trump’s State of the Union Address, the Democratic party’s response, and in-depth analysis from the PBS NewsHour team.

 

The Democratic response can be viewed below.

 

 



INDEPENDENT LENS
The Bad Kids

 

Located in an impoverished Mojave Desert community, Black Rock Continuation High School is an alternative school for students at risk of dropping out; Black Rock is their last chance. Extraordinary educators believe that empathy and life skills, more than academics, give these underserved students command of their own futures.

 

Students at PBS Hawai‘i

The following position is currently open:

Student Production Technician – Part-time

 

In line with our educational mission, PBS Hawai‘i offers a training program for college students to gain valuable experience in the media industry. We offer student positions in media production, marketing/communications and graphic design.

 

College students have always been the backbone of PBS Hawai‘i’s production crew. Many of them have gone on to successful media careers. See some of their stories here!

 

 

 

 


Below are our available student positions:

Student Production Technician – Part-time

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The part-time Student Production Technician is an entry-level position within PBS Hawaiʻi’s Creative Services department. Training includes operating video cameras, video switcher, audio equipment, character generator, still store, teleprompter, floor directing, and assembling/lighting sets. Occasional field shoots required. Other duties include carrying equipment and set pieces (sometimes heavy), working atop 13-foot ladders, and driving company vehicles. Must be able to lift 40 lbs. and have a clean drivers abstract. Hours vary weekly between 4–19 hours, depending on production schedules. Good availability on weekends and evenings a plus. Availability for weekly Thursday evening productions a must. Looking for applicants who can make a commitment of at least one year.

 

No experience necessary. Starting pay is $10.10 per hour. This position reports directly to the Vice President of Integrated Media, but will also work under the leadership of any senior staff member assigned to the project.

 

PBS Hawai‘i
Human Resources Manager
P.O. Box 29606
Honolulu, HI   96820-2006

 

Or Email to humanresources@pbshawaii.org

 

Or fax to 808. 462. 5090.

 

EEO

 

Click to Download the PBS Hawai‘i Part-Time Employment Application Form (PDF)

 


President Obama’s Farewell Address

 

President Barack Obama is scheduled to give his farewell address to the nation on Monday, January 9 at 4:00 pm. The President will deliver his speech from his hometown of Chicago, marking the first time that a President has returned to his hometown to deliver such a speech.

 

Through his address, the President will thank his supporters, celebrate the ways we have changed this country for the better these past eight years, and offer his vision on where we all go from here.

 

In 1796, as George Washington set the precedent for a peaceful, democratic transfer of power, he also set a precedent by penning a farewell address to the American people. Over the 220 years since, many American presidents have followed his lead.

 

(Source: whitehouse.gov)

 

FRONTLINE
President Trump

 

FRONTLINE examines the key moments that shaped President-elect Donald Trump. Interviews with advisors, business associates, and biographers reveal how Trump transformed himself from real estate developer to entertainer to president.

 

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