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Connecting through Storytelling

 

CEO Message

 

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO

Over the course of 13 years as CEO of PBS Hawaiʻi, I’ve had ample opportunity to experience something very delightful about our viewers:

 

Many of them are every bit as compelling in communicating as our professional storytellers.

 

Good storytellers know their audience. They know how to connect with emotion and imagination. I think that’s why many of our programs evoke strong responses; and it’s why our viewers’ letters “get” to us.

 

In correspondence, some of our viewers relate family stories passed down through the generations, describing intimate conversations at pivotal times of history, such as the overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy, the Pearl Harbor attack and closely fought elections.

 

CEO Message: Connecting through Storytelling

 

It’s a wonderful exchange – viewers writing to amplify something they saw in one of our programs, or to add context, or to riff on a related thought. Often they’re telling of their own experience, after a story that aired on PBS Hawaiʻi has struck a chord in their life.

 

Responding to PBS NewsHour coverage of the crackdown on immigrants seeking shelter and work in the U.S., a Honolulu viewer wrote that more immigrants should be welcomed: “My grandfather, who came from Japan, worked from morning to night for three dollars a day. I am third generation and educated … I will not work at a job where I get dirty. I will not work at a job where I get smelly. I will not work at a job that requires me to carry more than five pounds. I am a typical third-generation immigrant.”

 

Another viewer reached out after seeing the American Experience episode about the Pacific search for Amelia Earhart. Just as if she were having an in-person conversation, she noted that the investigation didn’t seem to include the hypothesis that the ocean had swallowed all trace of evidence.

 

“I think that is really what happened,” she wrote. “But empirical research is never really satisfied with a ‘nothing’ outcome. There has to be something ‘real.’ And more importantly, there has to be ‘closure,’ which may not be true.”

 

As author Annette Simmons said, “Story gives people enough space to think for themselves. The story develops and grows in the mind of the listener …”

 

We’re all the richer for connecting through storytelling.

 

Mahalo nui,

Leslie signature

 

 

NORMAN MINETA AND HIS LEGACY:
AN AMERICAN STORY

NORMAN MINETA AND HIS LEGACY: AN AMERICAN STORY

 

The child of immigrants, Norman Mineta’s uniquely American story charts a path from the shame he experienced as a Japanese American inside a U.S. internment camp during World War II to his triumphant rise to political prominence that has shaped every level of government, and made him one of the most influential Asian Americans in the history of our nation. His distinguished career has been a continuous unmatched slate of firsts, including 20 years in the United States Congress and eventually serving in the cabinets of two presidents from different political parties: Bill Clinton and George W. Bush. Still thriving today in his 80s, he is celebrated as a bipartisan visionary who preached political civility, yet was a bold change-maker with a deft political touch and an inclusive vision of the future.

 

Preview

 

 

 

POV
Listening is an Act of Love: A StoryCorps Special

 

This animated special from StoryCorps celebrates the transformative power of listening, featuring six stories from 10 years of the innovative oral history project, where everyday people sit down together to share memories and tackle life’s important questions.

 

THE BRAIN WITH DAVID EAGLEMAN
How Do I Decide?

 

Neuroscientist David Eagleman explores the human brain in an epic series that reveals the ultimate story of us – why we feel and think the things we do. This ambitious series blends science with innovative visual effects and compelling personal stories.

 

How Do I Decide?
Learn how the brain navigates the tens of thousands of conscious decisions we make every day and the many more unconscious decisions we make about everything from whom we find attractive to what we perceive.

 

The Brain with David Eagleman
Who is in Control?

 

Neuroscientist David Eagleman explores the human brain in an epic series that reveals the ultimate story of us – why we feel and think the things we do. This ambitious series blends science with innovative visual effects and compelling personal stories.

 

Who is in Control?
Dr. Eagleman explores the unconscious brain and reveals that everything from our movements, to our decisions, to our behavior is largely controlled and orchestrated by an invisible world of unconscious neural activity.

 

The Brain with David Eagleman
What Makes Me?

 

Neuroscientist David Eagleman explores the human brain in an epic series that reveals the ultimate story of us – why we feel and think the things we do. This ambitious series blends science with innovative visual effects and compelling personal stories.

 

What Makes Me?
Explore how we are our brains: how our personality, emotions and memories are encoded as neural activity. The process of becoming continues through our lives. We change our brains and our brains change us.

 

The Brain with David Eagleman
“What is Reality?”

 

Neuroscientist David Eagleman explores the human brain in an epic series that reveals the ultimate story of us – why we feel and think the things we do. This ambitious series blends science with innovative visual effects and compelling personal stories.

 

What is Reality?
Dr. Eagleman takes viewers on an extraordinary journey, exploring how the brain, locked in silence and darkness, without any direct access to the outside world, constructs multi-sensory reality and conjures up the rich and beautiful world we all take for granted.