tradition

COUNTRY MUSIC
A Film by Ken Burns

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COUNTRY MUSIC premieres September 15, 2019
All programs begin at 8:00 pm

Preview

 

Explore the history of a uniquely American art form: country music. From its deep and tangled roots in ballads, blues and hymns performed in small settings, to its worldwide popularity, learn how country music evolved over the course of the twentieth century. The series, directed by Ken Burns, features never-before-seen footage and photographs, plus interviews with more than 80 country music artists. No one has told the story this way before.


 

COUNTRY MUSIC: A Film by Ken Burns - The Rub (Beginnings – 1933)

The Rub (Beginnings – 1933)

Sunday, Sept. 15, 8:00 pm

See how what was first called “hillbilly music” reaches new audiences through phonographs and radio, and launches the careers of country music’s first big stars, the Carter Family and Jimmie Rodgers.

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COUNTRY MUSIC: A Film by Ken Burns - Hard Times (1933 – 1945)

Hard Times (1933 – 1945)

Monday, Sept. 16, 8:00 pm

Watch as Nashville becomes the heart of the country music industry. The genre grows in popularity during the Great Depression and World War II as America falls in love with singing cowboys, Texas Swing and the Grand Ole Opry’s Roy Acuff.

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COUNTRY MUSIC: A Film by Ken Burns - The Hillbilly Shakespeare (1945 – 1953)

The Hillbilly Shakespeare (1945 – 1953)

Tuesday, Sept. 17, 8:00 pm

See how the bluegrass sound spreads in post-war America, and meet honky-tonk star Hank Williams, whose songs of surprising emotional depth are derived from his troubled and tragically short life.

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COUNTRY MUSIC: A Film by Ken Burns - I Can’t Stop Loving You (1953 – 1963)

I Can’t Stop Loving You (1953 – 1963)

Wednesday, Sept. 18, 8:00 pm

Travel to Memphis, where Sun Studios artists Johnny Cash and Elvis Presley usher in the era of rockabilly. Ray Charles crosses America’s racial divide by recording a country album. Patsy Cline shows off Music City’s smooth new Nashville Sound.

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COUNTRY MUSIC: A Film by Ken Burns - The Sons and Daughters of America (1964 – 1968)

The Sons and Daughters of America (1964 – 1968)

Sunday, Sept. 22, 8:00 pm

See how country music reflects a changing America, with Loretta Lynn speaking to women everywhere, Merle Haggard becoming “The Poet of the Common Man” and audiences looking beyond race to embrace Charley Pride.

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COUNTRY MUSIC: A Film by Ken Burns - Will the Circle Be Unbroken? (1968 – 1972)

Will the Circle Be Unbroken? (1968 – 1972)

Monday, Sept. 23, 8:00 pm

Learn how country music responds to a nation divided by the Vietnam War, as Army captain turned songwriter Kris Kristofferson sets a new lyrical standard, and artists like Bob Dylan and the Byrds find a recording home in Nashville.

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COUNTRY MUSIC: A Film by Ken Burns - Are You Sure Hank Done It This Way? (1973 – 1983)

Are You Sure Hank Done It This Way? (1973 – 1983)

Tuesday, Sept. 24, 8:00 pm

Witness a vibrant era in country music, with Dolly Parton finding mainstream success; Hank Williams, Jr. and Rosanne Cash emerging from their famous fathers’ shadows; and Willie Nelson and Waylon Jennings launching the “Outlaw” movement.

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COUNTRY MUSIC: A Film by Ken Burns - Don’t Get Above Your Raisin’ (1984 – 1996)

Don’t Get Above Your Raisin’ (1984 – 1996)

Wednesday, Sept. 25, 8:00 pm

Learn how “New Traditionalists” like George Strait, Randy Travis and the Judds help country music stay true to its roots. Witness both the rise of superstar Garth Brooks and the return of an aging Johnny Cash to the industry he helped create.

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INDEPENDENT LENS
Out of State

INDEPENDENT LENS: Out of State

 

Shipped thousands of miles away from Hawaiʻi to a private prison in the Arizona desert, two Native Hawaiians discover their indigenous traditions from a fellow inmate serving a life sentence.

 

Learn more about the filmmaker

 

Preview

 

 

 

NĀ MELE: TRADITIONS IN HAWAIIAN SONG
Peter Medeiros

NA MELE Peter Medeiros

 

Slack key artist Peter Medeiros, accompanied by guitarist Josh Silva and bass player Nate Stillman, presents a fun evening of traditional slack key. Joining the trio are the dancers of Pua Aliʻi ʻIlima, led by kumu hula Vicky and Jeff Kānekaiwilani Takamine. Songs performed include “Ulili E,” “He‘eia,” “Ke Ala O Ka Rose” and “Kananaka.”

 

 

 

SKINDIGENOUS
Samoa – Peter Suluaʻpe

 

Western Samoa is one of the few places on the planet where traditional tattooing continued unimpeded through the colonial era. Sua Peter Suluaʻpe is a contemporary master of the craft. With his father and brothers, he works out of a cultural village in the heart of Apia, the Samoan capital. The Suluaʻpes are one of only two Samoan families who are authorized by tradition to create tattoos in accordance with ancient custom. Embracing their role, they carry on a sacred practice whose origins lie in legend, and which continues to shape the character of Samoa today.

 

SKINDIGENOUS - Samoa: Peter Suluʻape

 

 

 

COUNTRY MUSIC:
Live at the Ryman, a Concert Celebrating the Film by Ken Burns

 

Join celebrated musicians for a concert celebrating the film by Ken Burns. Hosted by Burns and featuring performances and appearances by Dierks Bentley, Rosanne Cash, Rhiannon Giddens, Vince Gill, Kathy Mattea, Marty Stuart, Dwight Yoakam and more.

 

COUNTRY MUSIC: Live at the Ryman, a Concert Celebrating the Film by Ken Burns

 

 

 

 

NĀ MELE: TRADITIONS IN HAWAIIAN SONG
Kawai Cockett and Darlene Ahuna

NĀ MELE Kawai Cockett and Darlene Ahuna

 

NĀ MELE features the traditional Hawaiian music of Darlene Ahuna and the late Kawai Cockett. In this vintage performance, Kawai Cockett is backed by Sam Sepitmo and Charlie Wahinehoʻokae. Joining Darlene Ahuna are her husband J.J. Ahuna and Led Kaapana. Haʻaheo Cockett provides hula artistry.

 

 

 

PBS HAWAIʻI PRESENTS
Keepers of the Flame: The Cultural Legacy of Three Hawaiian Women

 

The lives of three extraordinary Hawaiian women, Mary Kawena Pukui, ‘Iolani Luahine and Edith Kanaka‘ole, are chronicled in this film. It shows how, together, they combined their talents and commitment to reignite the flame of tradition in a time when Hawaiian culture was gravely threatened.

 

 

 







PBS HAWAIʻI PRESENTS
Words, Earth & Aloha: The Source of Hawaiian Music

PBS HAWAIʻI PRESENTS - Words, Earth & Aloha: The Source of Hawaiian Music

 

Featuring some of Hawai‘i’s most respected cultural resources and talented performers, this documentary pays tribute to composers who flourished between the 1870s and the 1920s. The film looks closely at Hawaiian lyrics and the places that inspired them, and charts the evolution of Hawaiian music with the introduction of imported musical forms.

 









SKINDIGENOUS
Toronto – Jay Soule

 

Jay Soule is a multidisciplinary artist known as “Chippewar” in the Indigenous community. His internationally-recognized work expresses much of the angst of today’s Indigenous population in Canada. Adopted at five years of age, Jay was taken from his birth mother and grew up outside his home community. He is considered part of the “Sixties Scoop,” a period in which Indigenous children were removed from their families and assimilated into non-Indigenous households. As a teenager, Jay left his home and opted for a life on the street. For a few years, he lived among the street kids of Toronto, eventually finding refuge in one of the city’s Indigenous shelters.

 

 

 

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