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HIKI NŌ
HIKI NŌ Class of 2019, Part Three

 

This is the third of four specials in which outstanding HIKI NŌ graduates from the Class of 2019 (and one student from the Class of 2020) gathered at PBS Hawaiʻi to discuss their HIKI NŌ experiences and how they feel the skills they learned from HIKI NŌ will help them in college, the workplace and life.

 

This episode features Carl Antiado, who graduated from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui and is now a Computer Science and Engineering major at the University of Nevada Reno; Kobie Uyeda, who graduated from Waiākea High School in Hilo and is now a Kinesiology Pre-Med major at Oregon State University; and Brandon Marcos, who graduated from Kauaʻi High School on Kauaʻi and is now majoring in Computer Science at UH Mānoa

 

Each graduate also shows a HIKI NŌ story that they worked on and discusses what they learned from the experience of working on that particular story. Carl shows his story about a band teacher he had who inspired Carl and turned him onto a new perspective on life. Kobie shares her story “Stay Humble, Pray,” about an ex-convict/drug addict who speaks to students about how to avoid bad life choices. Brandon presents his story “Kapaʻa Gridlock,” an investigation into why traffic is so heavy on Kauaʻi.

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI
Sex Trafficking in Hawaiʻi

 

Sex trafficking, a multi-million dollar international industry that uses the internet and the street trade to exploit women, is real in Hawaiʻi. A study indicates that a disproportionate number of victims are Native Hawaiian women. The same study says that local law enforcement has been ineffective in addressing the problem, and even complicit in keeping it alive. Is there a solution? This week on INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI, we’ll discuss adult victims; a future episode will cover minors. You can join the discussion by phoning in, or leave us a comment on Facebook or Twitter.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 


INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI
Red Light Cameras

 

Watch for a while at almost any busy intersection around the state and you’ll see it: a motorist runs the red light. The state is considering a pilot program to install red light cameras to catch violators. How will these cameras work and who will pay for them? Are they necessary? Join the discussion on Red Light Cameras on INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Dangerous Crossings

 

We all know Hawaiʻi is one of the most beautiful places in the country to live, but it is also one of the most dangerous – if you’re a pedestrian. Through mid-November, there have been 36 pedestrian deaths statewide this year, up from 15 last year. How do we save lives?

 

Join us during these live forums by phoning in or by leaving us a comment on Facebook or Twitter. INSIGHTS is also live streamed on pbshawaii.org and PBS Hawaiʻi’s Facebook page.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

To see an archive of past INSIGHTS ELECTION 2018 shows, click here.

 

 

 

 

AMERICA BY THE NUMBERS WITH MARIA HINOJOSA
Native American Boomtown

 

The Bakken oil boom is bringing billions of dollars and tens of thousands of jobs to North Dakota. A substantial part of the oil production is concentrated on an Indian reservation. Fort Berthold Reservation’s 1,000-plus oil wells have brought in money and jobs for some, but oil has also brought danger – organized crime, hard drugs, traffic fatalities – and other problems. Tribe members speak about the benefits and consequences of the boom.