Ukulele

NĀ MELE
Ledward Kaapana and Family

 

On most Friday evenings, slack key artist Ledward Kaapana gets together with his neighbors to share potluck dishes, laughter and music. For Ledward, it’s a tradition that goes back to his younger days in Kalapana on the island of Hawaii. “When I was growing up, we used to have kani ka pila…everybody sit down and enjoy, listen to music,” Ledward remembers. This special Na Mele features Ledward and his sisters Lei Aken, Lehua Nash and Rhoda Kekona, playing their music in Ledward’s garage. Ledward’s falsetto voice leads off with “Nani,” and Lei, Lehua and Rhoda take vocal solos on “Kaneohe,” “Kalapana” and “Holei.”

 

 




NĀ MELE
Waipuna

 

Kale Hannahs, David Kamakahi and Matt Sproat of the acclaimed Hawaiian music group Waipuna present their interpretation of Hawaiian music, accompanied by hula dancer Jaimie Kennedy. From “Malama Mau Hawai‘i,” a selection from Waipuna’s first album, to “E Mau Ke Aloha,” composed by David’s father, Dennis Kamakahi, Waipuna will take you through a joyful musical cycle.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #1002 – Sustainable Boost and other stories

HIKI NŌ: Episode #1002

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i introduce us to an unconventional food source in the U.S. – crickets! Kaua‘i farmer Lourdes Torres recalls first hearing about the idea of insects as food from her grandmother. “She would point at them and say, ‘That’s food.’” And we thought, “Yeah, maybe, if there was famine.” But as co-founder of food manufacturing company Sustainable Boost, Torres has developed a cricket/taro blend powder that is high in protein and is said to have a mild, nutty flavor. She raises the crickets on a plant-based diet, and the insects have a much smaller impact on the environment than other forms of livestock.

 
Program

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

Students from Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of a young woman who bravely faces her battle with depression every day.

 

Students from Waimea Elementary School on Hawai‘i make their HIKI NŌ debut by showing us how to make pickled mango. (Waimea Elementary is only the fourth elementary school to have a project air on HIKI NŌ.)

 

Students from Wai‘anae High School on O‘ahu introduce us to ‘ukulele player Nick Acosta, who has become a virtuoso on the instrument, despite the fact that he has only one complete arm.

 

Students from Kaua‘i High School in Līhu‘e take us to a local establishment that serves coffee and also serves the community.

 

Students from ‘Ilima Intermediate School on O‘ahu show us how a community pool has become a special gathering place for those who swim there.

 

And students from Island School on Kaua‘i show us how an invasive plant is being eradicated from Kaua‘i’s waterways.

 

 

 

NĀ MELE
Natalie Ai Kamauu and Family

 

Natalie Ai Kamauu’s voice fills the PBS Hawaii studio.  Natalie performs with a passion that comes from the origins of the songs she sings, and the love she has for her family. She is joined by her husband, Iolani Kamauu, on guitar and vocals, and their daughter, Sha-Lei Kamauu, who accompanies the music with hula.

 

Among the songs featured are “Pili Aloha,” which connects Natalie to her mother, kumu hula Olana Ai, and “Shower Tree,” which was written for Natalie and Iolaniʻs son, Chaz. Sha-Lei joins Natalie and Iolani with hula, including the playful “Hula Tease,” and a graceful accompaniment to Natalie and Iolaniʻs performance on “Uhiwai.”

 

NĀ MELE
Keauhou

 

Young trio Keauhou stand framed by red velvet curtains, white columns and koa furniture – a recreation of a bygone era, when Waikiki was about opulence and old-world splendor. While these young men have no firsthand experience of this era, when they sing, their ringing falsetto sounds right at home. Composed of Zachary Lum (vocals and guitar), Jonah Kahanuola Solatorio (vocals and ‘ukulele), and Nicholas Lum (vocals and bass), the name Keauhou translates as “the new or renewed generation,” fitting for a group that plays traditional Hawaiian music from the early to mid-20th century with a modern approach. The program features original songs from the group, such as “Hanohano Haʻiku,” “Kahiko Kapalama,” and “Aloha Maunalua” as well as a special guest performance from mentor and musical legend Robert Cazimero.

 

 




NĀ MELE
Keali‘i Reichel

NĀ MELE: Guest artist Keali'i Reichel

 

Keali‘i Reichel has long established himself as one of Hawai‘i’s premier artists. His dedication to the perpetuation of Hawaiian language, song, chanting and hula has evolved into unique and personal performances that showcase the depth of Hawaiian culture for international audiences. This performance, recorded at the PBS Hawai‘i studio, excellently showcases his artistry.

 

 

NĀ MELE
Haunani Apoliona and Kuʻuipo Kumukahi

NĀ MELE: Haunani Apoliona and Kuʻuipo Kumukahi

 

Multiple Hōkū Hanohano Award-winners Haunani Apoliona and Ku’uipo Kumukahi present classic Hawaiian songs in both solo and duet performances.

 

 

NĀ MELE
Kaumakaiwa Lopaka Kanaka ʻole & Kainani Kahaunaele

NĀ MELE: Kaumakaiwa Lopaka Kanaka ʻole & Kainani Kahaunaele

 

NĀ MELE presents two stars of contemporary Hawaiian Music: Kainani Kahaunaele and Kaumakaiwa Lopaka Kanaka’ole. Hawaiian language instructor Kahaunaele’s powerful voice and original compositions have served as a focal point for her research into haku mele. Kanaka’ole, the heir to a family musical legacy, combines traditional Hawaiian instruments and songs to create energy-filled productions that expand the definition of Hawaiian music.

 

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Ohta-san: Virtuosity and Legacy

 

Herb Ohta is one of the giants of the ‘ukulele who snatched the simple four-stringed instrument out of the background and planted it firmly at the front of the stage. In this special, Herb Ohta, known as Ohta-San, brings his solo ukulele riffs to the PBS Hawai‘i studios, playing numbers such as “Rhapsody in Blue,” “The Girl from Ipanema,” and his chart-topping ballad, “Song for Anna.” He also teams up with his son, Herb Ohta Jr., for their take on the Hawaiian classics “Hi’ilawe” and “Sanoe.”

 

 

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