Ukulele

NĀ MELE: TRADITIONS IN HAWAIIAN SONG
Nina Kealiʻiwahamana & Bill Kaiwa

NĀ MELE: Traditions in Hawaiian Song - Nina Kealiʻiwahamana & Bill Kaiwa

 

The magic of Hawaii Calls is revived when Nina Kealiʻiwahamana joins Bill Kaiwa for some traditional Hawaiian classics in this special encore of a classic NĀ MELE. Nina and Bill are joined for this journey down memory lane by Martin Pahinui on bass, and Steven Hall and George Kuo on guitar.

 

 

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Ohta-san: Virtuosity and Legacy

PBS Hawaii Presents Ohta-san: Virtuosity and Legacy

Herb Ohta is one of the giants of the ‘ukulele who snatched the simple four-stringed instrument out of the background and planted it firmly at the front of the stage. In this special, Herb Ohta, known as Ohta-San, brings his solo ukulele riffs to the PBS Hawai‘i studios, playing numbers such as “Rhapsody in Blue,” “The Girl from Ipanema,” and his chart-topping ballad, “Song for Anna.” He also teams up with his son, Herb Ohta Jr., for their take on the Hawaiian classics “Hi’ilawe” and “Sanoe.”

 

Preview

 

 

 

NĀ MELE: TRADITIONS IN HAWAIIAN SONG
The Leo Nahenahe Singers

The Leo Nahenahe Sisters on Na Mele

 

“Leo nahenahe” is Hawaiian for “soft and sweet.” Now in their eighties, The Leo Nahenahe Singers celebrate over 50 years of performing together on this episode of NĀ MELE. Ethelynne Teves on guitar, Noelani Mahoe on ukulele and Mona Teves on upright bass accompany their instruments with their soft and sweet vocals. These Nā Hokū and Hawaiian Music Hall of Fame honorees perform Hawaiian classics like “Hanohano Wale No” and “Koni Au I Ka Wai.”

 

Preview

 

 

 

NĀ MELE: TRADITIONS IN HAWAIIAN SONG
More! Ledward Kaapana and Family

 

Ledward Kaapana remembers his Uncle Fred Punahoa playing the song “Radio Hula” in Kalapana: “In the morning, like one, two o’clock in the morning. In Kalapana, it’s so quiet, so… you know, and it’s dark, and so, he used to just sit outside on the porch, and play his guitar. I don’t know if you ever experienced sleeping…and hear one guitar just playing sweet music that just wake you up and like, ‘Oh, so sweet,’” Kaapana remembers. “Radio Hula” is one of the songs that Ledward Kaapana, along with his sisters Lehua Nash, Rhoda Kekona, and Lei Aken play in his Kaneohe garage on a rainy evening. They also share an energetic slack key performance of “Kuu Ipo Onaona,” and Ledward honors the late Dennis Kamakahi with “Kokee.”

 

 

NĀ MELE: TRADITIONS IN HAWAIIAN SONG
Peter Medeiros

NA MELE Peter Medeiros

 

Slack key artist Peter Medeiros, accompanied by guitarist Josh Silva and bass player Nate Stillman, presents a fun evening of traditional slack key. Joining the trio are the dancers of Pua Ali‘i ‘Ilima, led by kumu hula Vicky and Jeff Kānekaiwilani Takamine. Songs performed include “Ulili E,” “He‘eia,” “Ke Ala O Ka Rose” and “Kananaka.”

 

 

 

NĀ MELE: TRADITIONS IN HAWAIIAN SONG
The Royal Hawaiian Band

NA MELE Royal Hawaiian Band

 

Founded in 1836 by King Kamehameha III, the Royal Hawaiian Band has
provided audiences the world over with a continual connection to Hawai‘i’s
royal heritage. During this vintage concert set on the grounds of historic
Iolani Palace, Bandmaster Aaron Mahi pays tribute to one of his predecessors,
Henry Berger, Royal Hawaiian Bandmaster from 1871 to 1915 and sometimes called
the “Father of Hawaiian music.”

 

 

NĀ MELE
George Winston (Plays Slack Key)

NĀ MELE  George Winston (Plays Slack Key)

 

This vintage episode presents a rare solo slack key concert with George Winston, best known the world over for his evocative piano music, musical interpretations of the ever-changing seasons of his childhood Montana home. But ki ho‘alu, slack key guitar music, has been his passion for many years. In this NĀ MELE classic, Winston performs his “Montana-ized” versions of such slack key classics as: “Sweet Lei Mamo” by Charles Hopkins; “None Hula” by Lena Machado; and Leonard Kwan’s “Nahe Nahe.”

 

 

 

NĀ MELE
Jerry Byrd & Friends

NĀ MELE: Jerry Byrd & Friends

 

NĀ MELE presents a special encore of the smooth sounds of the late master steel guitarist Jerry Byrd. Byrd was joined for this nostalgic journey by four master musicians in their own right: Hiram Olsen Jr. on guitar and vocals; Dennis Keohokalole on ukulele and vocals; Gary Aiko on upright bass and vocals; and the late Ned Ka‘apana on guitar and vocals.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #1002 – Sustainable Boost and other stories

HIKI NŌ: Episode #1002

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i introduce us to an unconventional food source in the U.S. – crickets! Kaua‘i farmer Lourdes Torres recalls first hearing about the idea of insects as food from her grandmother. “She would point at them and say, ‘That’s food.’” And we thought, “Yeah, maybe, if there was famine.” But as co-founder of food manufacturing company Sustainable Boost, Torres has developed a cricket/taro blend powder that is high in protein and is said to have a mild, nutty flavor. She raises the crickets on a plant-based diet, and the insects have a much smaller impact on the environment than other forms of livestock.

 
Program

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

Students from Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of a young woman who bravely faces her battle with depression every day.

 

Students from Waimea Elementary School on Hawai‘i make their HIKI NŌ debut by showing us how to make pickled mango. (Waimea Elementary is only the fourth elementary school to have a project air on HIKI NŌ.)

 

Students from Wai‘anae High School on O‘ahu introduce us to ‘ukulele player Nick Acosta, who has become a virtuoso on the instrument, despite the fact that he has only one complete arm.

 

Students from Kaua‘i High School in Līhu‘e take us to a local establishment that serves coffee and also serves the community.

 

Students from ‘Ilima Intermediate School on O‘ahu show us how a community pool has become a special gathering place for those who swim there.

 

And students from Island School on Kaua‘i show us how an invasive plant is being eradicated from Kaua‘i’s waterways.

 

 

 

NĀ MELE
Kawai Cockett and Darlene Ahuna

NĀ MELE Kawai Cockett and Darlene Ahuna

 

NĀ MELE features the traditional Hawaiian music of Darlene Ahuna and the late Kawai Cockett. In this vintage performance, Kawai Cockett is backed by Sam Sepitmo and Charlie Wahineho‘okae. Joining Darlene Ahuna are her husband J.J. Ahuna and Led Kaapana. Ha‘aheo Cockett provides hula artistry.

 

 

 

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