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The Mission of Reaching Far and Deep

 

CEO Message

 

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEOThe theme of human connection ran alongside the subject of digital media strategies at the PBS Annual Meeting last month in Nashville, Tennessee. Which felt just right. What we strive to do in public media is combine the power of touch and the reach of tech to serve our home states.

 

Why meet in Nashville? Because PBS representatives from around the country need to meet somewhere – and Music City was a great setting for renowned filmmaker Ken Burns to share his newest epic, Country Music.

 

He spoke in a hotel ballroom two blocks from a boulevard of windows-thrown-open, live-music honky tonks. The eight-part, 16-hour film premieres on PBS stations nationally on Sunday, September 15.

 

At the conference, Burns said the film isn’t only for country music fans. At the heart of this American art form are honesty, vulnerability and real life. It’s about the joy of love and family, the hurt of betrayal, loneliness, regret, resilience, toil, faith, independence and the lure of the open road.

 

The Mission of Reaching Far and Deep

Leslie at Nashville conference with national PBS figures (right to left)
news anchor Judy Woodruff, commentator David Brooks and
(far left) arts adviser Jane Chu

 

I had the privilege of taking part in a discussion on stage with heavy hitters: (right to left) PBS NewsHour anchor and managing editor Judy Woodruff; NY Times Op-Ed columnist/PBS NewsHour commentator/author David Brooks and (far left) PBS Arts Adviser Jane Chu. We looked at how the arts reach deep within people and we considered Brooks’ proposition that the neighborhood, not the individual, is the essential unit of social change. And we talked about using local knowledge to determine the best ways to convene and authentically engage communities of diverse voices.

 

Just as there’s no quick fix for the broken heart in a country song, there’s no manual for success in the rapidly changing media industry. The spinning evolution of tech choices, viewer options and fragmented audiences requires media makers to be agile and relentlessly purposeful – and that still doesn’t assure success.

 

Here’s an industry expectation that’s a safe bet: In three years or less there will be as many digital screens as live TV screens being used to view programming.

 

PBS KIDS viewing is already there. Digital screens dominate in front of young children, who also use them to play PBS educational video games.

 

Back from Nashville, our local team knows that we need more than quality programming going for PBS Hawaiʻi; we need to offer easy availability. You as a viewer want to be able to watch what you want – when and where you want it. Our Passport streaming service and our website on-demand programs are a start.

 

If PBS Hawaiʻi’s digital strategy goals were a country music song, the title would be “I’ll Go Anywhere With You.”

 

Aloha Nui,

Leslie signature


 

The Evolution of HIKI NŌ

 

COVER STORY: The Evolution of HIKI NŌ by Robert Pennybacker - Director, Learning Initiatives, PBS Hawaiʻi

 

Students from O‘ahu’s Ka‘ala Elementary School in Wahiawā

Students from O‘ahu’s Ka‘ala Elementary School

 

Launching a New Season
Thursday, February 7, 7:30 pm

 

When HIKI NŌ premiered on February 28, 2011, the HIKI NŌ students from Ka‘ala Elementary School who grace the cover of this program guide were toddlers. The Maui Waena Intermediate School students who hosted that first episode are now seniors in college. If the students have matured over the eight years HIKI NŌ has been on the air, so has the program.

 

Eight years ago, a weekly half-hour show in which middle and high school students write, report, shoot and edit PBS-quality news features on topics that they selected was inconceivable. Before going on the air, the premise of HIKI NŌ (which means “Can Do” in the Hawaiian language) was based on the supposition that the same professional quality found in news stories already being created at Wai‘anae High School’s Searider media program could be duplicated in other schools across the islands. Nobody knew if this grand experiment would work.

 

Not only did it work – it flourished beyond expectations and spread to 90 public, charter, and private schools throughout state – including four elementary schools!

 

Clockwise from top left: Students from Maui’s Seabury Hall School, A student from O‘ahu’s Aliamanu Middle School with Pearl Harbor attack witness Jimmy Lee at the World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument, Students from Maui's Lahaina Intermediate School, Students from Kauaʻi's Kapaʻa Middle School

Clockwise from top left: Students from Maui’s Seabury Hall School, A student from O‘ahu’s  Aliamanu Middle School with Pearl Harbor attack witness Jimmy Lee at the World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument, Students from Maui’s Lahaina Intermediate School, Students from Kauaʻi’s Kapaʻa Middle School

 

HIKI NŌ has thrived because of its unique intersection of two distinct worlds: The education world and the real-life world of a public television station that must uphold the standards of its broadcast and online content.

 

The rigorous experience of refining their stories to meet PBS national standards has helped HIKI NŌ students to dominate national digital media competitions. At the Student Television Network’s 2018 Fall Challenge, Hawai‘i’s HIKI NŌ schools garnered 33% of the awards given out for that competition. Hawai‘i took home the most awards of any state (13), followed by California (10) and Florida (5).

 

After the launch of the program, teachers and others from the education world began to notice that the HIKI NŌ experience taught students much more than how to tell stories with pictures and sound. It helped them to develop the basic skills needed to survive in the new, global economy: critical thinking, creative problem solving, adaptability, collaboration, teamwork and entrepreneurialism. The recognition that these skills are essential to students’ success in college and beyond has led to dynamic partnerships between HIKI NŌ/PBS Hawai‘i and the state’s Early College and P-20 programs.

 

A core group of HIKI NŌ teachers informally known as Hawai‘i Creative Media proved to be the most effective trainers of other HIKI NŌ teachers and their students. Their importance to the process became so evident that they organized themselves as a nonprofit organization – the Hawai‘i Creative Media Foundation – whose mission is to provide students and teachers across the state with training in basic digital media skills.

 

The state’s CTE (Career Technology Education) program and the Department of Education have recognized the importance of this training and are making plans to fund the Hawai‘i Creative Media-led teacher/student workshops. Up until now these workshops have been paid for by PBS Hawai‘i. This shift toward the educational institutions funding the training of its teachers and students represents a sea change for HIKI NŌ. It acknowledges that the educators are equal partners in the HIKI NŌ process and brings into focus the distinct roles that the two worlds must play: Hawai‘i’s educators teach Hawai‘i’s students, while PBS Hawai‘i provides them with the real-world, professional experience, plus statewide (broadcast) and worldwide (online) platforms for their voices to be heard.

 

 

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
The Cleaners

INDEPENDENT LENS: The Cleaners

 

Meet some of the people whom Silicon Valley leaders like Facebook and Google hire to do “digital cleaning” – deleting offensive, pornographic and incendiary posts. Mostly located in the Philippines, these “content moderators” delete “inappropriate” content on the net, thereby influencing what people around the world see and think. A typical “cleaner” must observe and rate thousands of often deeply disturbing images and videos every day, leading to lasting psychological impacts. Viewer discretion is advised.

 

Preview

 

 

 

How To Shoot A Host Segment That Has No B-roll

 

How To Shoot A Host Segment That Has No B-roll (4:49)

 

Shooting a host segment usually involves an on-camera host, a voice-over talking about a specific given subject, and B-roll of that subject to cover the voice-over. However, in this tutorial we will go over how to shoot a host segment using only an on-camera host with no B-roll.

 

(Narrated by Nikki Miyamoto)

 

 

 

ROYAL WEDDING WATCH
Day 1: A Wedding Is Announced

 

Each weeknight leading up to Prince Henry and Meghan Markle’s wedding, PBS presents a series of programs highlighting preparations in London that week, with highlights on royal wedding etiquette and protocol.

 

Day 1: A Wedding Is Announced

Join hosts Meredith Vieira and Matt Baker to learn more about Prince Harry and Meghan Markle and discover what it takes to be a royal bride in training. Historian Lucy Worsley reveals how Queen Victoria set the trend for the modern white wedding.

 

 

ROYAL WEDDING WATCH
Day 2: What to Wear

 

Each weeknight leading up to Prince Henry and Meghan Markle’s wedding, PBS presents a series of programs highlighting preparations in London that week, with highlights on royal wedding etiquette and protocol.

 

Day 2: What to Wear

Follow historian Lucy Worsley into the archives to see dresses chosen by previous royal brides. Experts and commentators join Meredith Vieira and Matt Baker to determine why royal style is dictated as much by protocol and etiquette as by fashion.

 

 

ROYAL WEDDING WATCH
Day 3: Ceremony

 

Each weeknight leading up to Prince Henry and Meghan Markle’s wedding, PBS presents a series of programs highlighting preparations in London that week, with highlights on royal wedding etiquette and protocol.

 

Day 3: Ceremony

Examine the ceremony and traditions at the heart of a royal wedding, which even a modern couple must follow. Experts, commentators and guests dissect the finer points of royal protocol, while Lucy Worsley surveys the history of royal marriages.

 

 

ROYAL WEDDING WATCH
Day 4: How to Celebrate

 

Each weeknight leading up to Prince Henry and Meghan Markle’s wedding, PBS presents a series of programs highlighting preparations in London that week, with highlights on royal wedding etiquette and protocol.

 

Day 4: How to Celebrate

Learn how the royal family celebrates a royal marriage. Experts and commentators join Vieira and Baker to talk about everything from the carriage procession to the cake. Anita Rani reports from Windsor Castle, where preparations are in full swing.

 

 

ROYAL WEDDING WATCH
Day 5: Happily Ever After

 

Each weeknight leading up to Prince Henry and Meghan Markle’s wedding, PBS presents a series of programs highlighting preparations in London that week, with highlights on royal wedding etiquette and protocol.

 

Day 5: Happily Ever After

Join Vieira and Baker, and experts, commentators and guests for the final countdown. Anita Rani reports from Windsor, where crowds gather for the celebrations. Historian Lucy Worsley explores Kensington Palace, soon to be Meghan and Harry’s new home.

 

 

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