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PBS Hawaii | Passport Frequently Asked Questions

PBS Hawaii Passport, your new member benefit

 

  1. What is PBS Hawai‘i Passport?

PBS Hawai‘i Passport is a new benefit which provides PBS Hawai‘i supporters extended on-demand access to a rich library of quality public television programming. This is one of the many benefits that PBS Hawai‘i provides its donors.

 

  1. Why is PBS Hawai‘i making this service available?

As more and more people are watching television content on-demand on digital devices, PBS Hawai‘i Passport gives PBS Hawai‘i donors a way to enjoy extended access to PBS and PBS Hawai‘i content on platforms including computers, smartphones and tablets.

 

  1. What kind of content can people find on PBS Hawai‘i Passport?

At launch, PBS Hawai‘i Passport will include several hundred hours of programming, representing many genres, including drama, science, history, natural history and the arts. Notable titles include MASTERPIECE series such as “Downton Abbey” and “Wolf Hall,” along with other favorites such as VICIOUS, EARTH A NEW WILD, HOW WE GOT TO NOW, THE GREAT BRITISH BAKING SHOW and many more. PBS Hawai‘i Passport will also include popular PBS Hawai‘i programs such as Na Mele archives. The PBS Hawai‘i Passport library will continue to grow as more series and episodes are added.

 

  1. How can viewers find content that’s available on PBS Hawai‘i Passport?

Donors who wish to take advantage of PBS Hawai‘i Passport, must activate their account for access. They will be asked to register to confirm their identity and membership status, and then they can start enjoying PBS Hawai‘i Passport.

PBS Hawai‘i Passport can be accessed on the PBS Hawai‘i website, as well as on PBS.org, the PBS Video apps for Android and iOS smartphones and tablets, and the PBS app on AppleTV when PBS Hawai‘i has been identified as your local station. To get started, look for videos with the compass icon. Those videos are only available to users who are registered for PBS Hawai‘i Passport.

 

  1. Who qualifies for PBS Hawai‘i Passport?

PBS Hawai‘i Passport is the newest benefit available from PBS Hawai‘i for donors with a yearly contribution of at least $60 or an ongoing monthly contribution of $5 or more. It cannot be purchased separately.

 

  1. Is PBS Hawai‘i Passport a service or subscription that people can purchase?

PBS Hawai‘i Passport is an added benefit of station support. It cannot be purchased separately and is not a subscription service.

 

  1. Does PBS Hawai‘i Passport mean there will be no more free streaming on PBS.org or on PBS Hawai‘i website?

No. PBS and PBS Hawai‘i content will continue to be available for free on pbs.org, pbshawaii.org and other digital platforms. PBS Hawai‘i Passport provides extended access to a rich library of content for PBS Hawai‘i supporters to enjoy.

Certain content, including news and public affairs programs such as FRONTLINE, PBS NEWSHOUR, INDEPENDENT LENS and POV, will always be accessible to everyone.

 

  1. Doesn’t having a subset of content only for donors go against what PBS and PBS Hawai‘i stands for?

PBS is committed to providing free streaming of local and national content across multiple platforms after a program airs. PBS Hawai‘i Passport goes one step further by offering an extended access to a rich library of content for station donors.

Certain content, including news and public affairs programs such as FRONTLINE, PBS NEWSHOUR, INDEPENDENT LENS and POV, will always be accessible to everyone.

 

  1. I’m not seeing my favorite PBS show in PBS Hawai‘i Passport. Why not?

Initially, several hundred hours of content will be available via PBS Hawai‘i Passport This library of content will continue grow over time as more titles are added.

 

  1. Will PBS KIDS content be available via PBS Hawai‘i Passport?

There are no plans to include PBS KIDS programming in PBS Hawai‘i Passport at this time.

 

Raising the Bar – The Best Way to Express Our Gratitude

Viewer thank you note

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiMy job is essentially to be a problem-solver. There’s certainly enough to reach for, as the fragmented worlds of media and education require more focus, more engagement, more depth, more context. And in this rapidly changing world, answers are a moving target.

 

But that’s not the toughest part of my job. As in other things in life, the simplest things can be the most difficult. And quite simply, it is very difficult to adequately express thanks.

 

Our unpaid Board of Directors and lean staff could spend most of the day writing thank-you letters or making calls – and it simply wouldn’t be enough to express the gratitude we feel here for what citizens are supporting.

 

After we lost our lease at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, the people of Hawai‘i and several mainland-based charitable foundations with ties to Hawaii gave us more than $30 million to establish a modern stand-alone multimedia center on Nimitz Highway at the entrance to Sand Island, PBS Hawai‘i’s Clarence T.C. Ching Campus. This nonprofit now owns an acre of land and a two-story building, which (thankfully) came in on time and on budget.

 

And still, after building us a new house, some viewers thank us. Here’s an example, from a woman who wrote by hand: “I hope you don’t get tired of my thank-you notes but I gotta say how much it means to me to watch [PBS Hawai‘i].” Here’s another hand-written note: “PBS Hawai‘i is contributing to society. I want PBS to continue this way. That’s why I make my donation.”

 

See what I mean? With a heart full of gratitude, I want you to know that we are dedicated to making the most out of your gift of a new building and your support of programming. We want to raise the bar on our stories and in quality in all areas, including our events for adults and keiki. We want to “be there” for our state – all of it, not just metropolitan Oahu. We want to be trusted for fairness and accuracy. And when we make mistakes, we want to own up and do better. Maybe that’s the best way to convey our thanks.

 

Also, we’re offering all the thousands of building donors a guided tour of the television station. Next month, after we complete technical troubleshooting, install a photovoltaic energy system and add donor signage, we’ll have an opening ceremony. But because of space concerns, we can’t invite all who made the building possible. So we invite NEW HOME donors to arrange a personal tour, now or later, by calling Christina Sumida at (808) 462-5045. Quite simply, we’d like to thank you in person.

 

Mahalo piha,
Leslie signature

 

CURIOUS TRAVELER
Curious About – London

 

Journalist Christine Van Blokland brings her passion and genuine curiosity for the arts, quirky characters, storytelling and lifelong learning to an exploration of London. She asks: Why is St. Paul’s Cathedral such an iconic symbol of London? And why doesn’t it face due East? And what does St. Paul have to do with the City of London crest? What is the City of London and why can’t the Queen come in? Why do so many London neighborhoods end in -gate? Why is Temple Church round? And what did those secretive Knights Templar do here? And what does all of this have to do with Magna Carta – and why has a copy remained at Salisbury Church for 800 years?

 

CURIOUS TRAVELER
Curious About… Victoria, British Columbia

 

This series takes viewers on an enriching and entertaining “field trip for grown-ups” to some of the most intriguing European and North American cities in the world. Entertainment journalist Christine Van Blokland brings her passion and genuine curiosity for the arts, quirky characters, storytelling and lifelong learning to this new series. In each location, Christine explores the hidden histories in their art, architecture, museums, monuments, houses of worship and city parks.

 

Curious About… Victoria, British Columbia
Who was “A.B.C. Architect” and why did he design such a grand Parliament Building in Victoria? What is Fan Tan Alley, and what does it have to do with the 2nd oldest Chinatown in North America? How did an 11th and 12th century French, Spanish & Italian Romanesque-style castle, built for a Scottish self-made millionaire, become “Canada’s Castle?” Why isn’t there a sign above the main entrance to The Empress Hotel? And finally, as we take High Tea here, is it pinkies up or down?

 

CURIOUS TRAVELER
Curious About…New York City

 

This series takes viewers on an enriching and entertaining “field trip for grown-ups” to some of the most intriguing European and North American cities in the world. Entertainment journalist Christine Van Blokland brings her passion and genuine curiosity for the arts, quirky characters, storytelling, and lifelong learning to this new series. In each location, Christine explores the hidden histories in their art, architecture, museums, monuments, houses of worship and city parks.

 

Curious About…New York City
Why are the constellations backwards in Grand Central? Why are there acorns all over the place? Why does the Great Hall at the Met look like the Baths of Caracalla? Why is there a golden Diana statue in the middle of the Met, and what does that have to do with the General Sherman statue by The Plaza? Why is Rockefeller Center’s Atlas statue permanently grimacing at St. Patrick’s Cathedral? And what does he have to do with the Pieta inside? Christine tries to find out.