word

PRESS ON MASTERPIECE
Don’t Take My Heart, Don’t Break My Heart

PRESS ON MASTERPIECE: Don’t Take My Heart, Don’t Break My Heart

 

Holly investigates a lead that a powerful business tycoon coerces young women into sleeping with him. As another source comes forward, Amina feels pressured to run the story. Duncan proposes a deal that could make waves in the political world.

 

 

 

PRESS ON MASTERPIECE
Death Knock

PRESS ON MASTERPIECE: Death Knock

 

Holly, deputy news editor of the Herald, tries to obtain CCTV footage of a fatal hit-and-run after it’s given to a tabloid. Post reporter Ed comes under pressure to run a story against the will of the parents of an athlete who took his own life.

 

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Literacy in Hawaiʻi

 

We know literacy as reading and writing, but it has become so much more. Literacy enables people, especially our keiki, to understand concepts and ideas and express opinions. Importantly, literacy allows them to grasp knowledge needed to meet the demands of today’s rapidly changing world. On the next INSIGHTS, we’ll discuss literacy in Hawaiʻi and look at how we are preparing children to not only participate in society but how to lead and solve problems. Join the conversation by phoning in, or leave us a comment on Facebook or Twitter.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 

 

AUSTIN CITY LIMITS
Tom Waits

AUSTIN CITY LIMITS: Tom Waits

 

Recorded in December 1978, the show came in through the back door, so to speak. Terry Lickona, who became producer in Season 4, was trying to book singer Leon Redbone. Redbone and Waits shared a manager, who promptly requested that Terry book his other client as well. In order to make sure the Redbone show happened, Terry agreed, even though he was nervous that the roots-oriented audience ACL had already built in its previous three seasons might think that Waits’ avant-garde gutter poetry was too radical for the show.

 

Preview

 

 

 

Martha Speaks

 

Martha Speaks is an animated series on PBS KIDS. Aimed at viewers between the ages of four and seven, Martha’s educational goal is to teach kids new words.

 

Based on the children’s book series by Susan Meddaugh and published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, the series stars Martha, a beloved family dog. She is accidentally fed alphabet soup — this gives her the power of speech and the chance to speak her mind to anyone that will listen.

 

With two stories in each episode, kids will get to know Martha as an outspoken, honest, smart, confident dog who loves to eat (and talk!). They will also meet the rest of Martha’s family and friends. Ten-year-old Helen is Martha’s best friend. Martha encourages the shy, artistic Helen to be more outgoing and brave. Helen acts as the voice of reason for Martha. It’s a relationship any dog, or pet-lover, can appreciate.

 

The series is supported by an educational outreach campaign that includes a cross-age reading buddy program. The show is Closed Captioned and described for the visually impaired. It’s produced by WGBH Boston and Vancouver’s Studio B Productions.

 

Learning Goals

The goal of Martha Speaks is to increase oral vocabulary, the words we use when we talk. The shows are not trying to teach kids how to read. They are designed to help kids understand what words mean when they hear them; words likeretrievesprout, and crave. Vocabulary is one thing that predicts if children will be good readers. Once they are in school and they see these words, children will need to know what they mean. If children have heard the words before, that familiarity will help them as they learn to read. Martha Speaks is designed to teach up to 20 words in each show. And how better to get kids excited about learning and trying out new words than with a talking dog, who just can’t stop talking?!