British

GREAT PERFORMANCES
Rodgers & Hammerstein’s The King and I

 

Kelli O’Hara and Ken Watanabe star in a Tony Award-winning revival of the beloved musical about a British schoolteacher instructing the royal children of the King of Siam, featuring classic songs including “Hello, Young Lovers” and “Shall We Dance.”

 

 

 

FAKE OR FORTUNE?
Toulouse-Lautrec

FAKE OR FORTUNE? Toulouse-Lautrec

 

The team investigates four sketchbooks which may be the work of the young French master. Alain Brun is a French psychoanalyst who lives in Bordeaux. He was given the sketchbooks by his grandmother in the 1960s and she always maintained they were the work of Toulouse Lautrec. Alain sent them to the Lautrec committee to see if they could be authenticated. They came back saying that it was actually the work of Lautrec’s tutor, Princeteau. However, Princeteau experts have disputed this – saying they are far too good. The team searches for evidence to see if they can irrefutably link these sketches to the young Lautrec and change the committee’s mind.

 

 

 

FAKE OR FORTUNE?
Giacometti

FAKE OR FORTUNE? Giacometti

 

Twentieth-century sculptures are hot property in the art market. Alberto Giacometti’s Pointing Man figure sold for $141m at auction in New York in 2015, making it the most expensive sculpture ever sold. Could a stark, white square of plaster that has been passed down through an English family with art world connections be one of Giacometti’s earliest and most daring works?

 

 

 

FAKE OR FORTUNE?
A Double Whodunnit

FAKE OR FORTUNE? A Double Whodunnit

 

Fiona Bruce and Philip Mould investigate two rare portraits of black British subjects from the 18th and 19th centuries. Painted with extraordinary skill and sophistication, both pieces of art are highly unusual in their positive depiction of black sitters at a time when Britain was still heavily engaged in slavery. But this is also an intriguing double whodunnit. Who are the artists who broke with the conventions of the time to paint these exceptional works?

 

 

 

Secrets of Her Majesty’s Secret Service

Secrets of Her Majesty’s Service

 

Her Majesty’s Secret Service, or MI6 as it is known, is the world’s most legendary spy agency, thanks to the James Bond stories. Set up in 1909 as the Secret Service Bureau, the existence of MI6 was not formally acknowledged until 1994 – which goes a long way toward understanding the modus operandi of this government agency. With unprecedented access to some of the key players in British espionage, this film lifts the veil on the shadowy world of spying, going back in time and behind the scenes to look at some the world’s most calculated and delicately executed operations.

 

 

 

FAKE OR FORTUNE?
Nicholson

 

In 2006 Lyn Fuss bought a still life Glass Jug with Pears on Plates by celebrated British artist William Nicholson. William may have been overshadowed by his more famous son Ben Nicholson, but William’s paintings are very collectable and fetch high prices. Lyn paid £165,000 for her Nicholson. Then in 2011 Lyn was told her picture wouldn’t appear in the official catalogue raisonne of Nicholson’s work. The implication is it’s a fake and, as such, is worth next to nothing. Could there have been a mistake? This is a very personal journey for Lyn since she bought the painting from the gallery of her deceased aunt, who was an authority on Nicholson and wrote the previous catalogue raisonne. The team tries to establish if this is a genuine Nicholson. Lyn not only wants to establish if she has lost the 165, 000 investment but also hopes it’s a chance to clear her aunt’s name.

 

FAKE OR FORTUNE? Nicholson

 

 

 

The Beatles: Eight Days A Week – The Touring Years

 

Explore the history of the Fab Four, from their early days in Liverpool to their last concert in San Francisco in 1966. The film, by Oscar-winning director Ron Howard, reveals how the foursome united to become the global phenomenon that was The Beatles.

 

 

 

RUDY MAXA’S WORLD
Nova Scotia & Newfoundland

 

From the charming fishing towns of Nova Scotia to the vast wilderness of Newfoundland, these are the last great. open spaces of Eastern North America. A touch of New England, a dash of Germany, here a British fort, there an Irish brogue, Nova Scotia and Newfoundland are mixed-up worlds peopled by the descendants of hardy colonists who came to fish and trade fur. Lighthouses sweep the skies, the seas are littered with shipwrecks whales cruise the coastline in the summer, storms rage in the winter, but the warmth of the hardy people who live in these two provinces makes the lonely landscape beautiful rather than forbidding.

 

 

 

Secrets of Scotland Yard

 

From Dickens to Sherlock Holmes, Agatha Christie to James Bond, no police institution in the world has caught the public imagination in the same way as Scotland Yard. The name has become synonymous with London’s police force, but actually comes from the location of the original police headquarters building. Its officers and “bobbies” are protectors of the Royal Family and British officials, but Scotland Yard is most often associated with police detectives. In this special, contemporary sleuths reveal the secrets of what it takes to become a modern-day Sherlock Holmes.

 

 

 

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