community

Indie Lens Pop-Up: Free film screenings at Impact Hub HNL

You’re invited to our next season of Indie Lens Pop-Up, a series of free screenings featuring upcoming Independent Lens documentaries.

 

LOCATION:

Impact Hub HNL

1050 Queen Street, Suite 100

(across from Whole Foods Market in Kakaʻako)

 

Community-driven conversations after each film spark discussions about issues rarely seen on the big screen, and connect people to resources in our community.

 

PBS Hawaiʻi co-presents Indie Lens Pop-Up alongside Hawaiʻi Women in Filmmaking, Hawaiʻi People’s Fund and Impact Hub HNL.

 

Dawnland
By Adam Mazo and Ben Pender-Cudlip

Wednesday, October 24, 2018 | 5:00 – 7:00 pm
Impact Hub, 1050 Queen Street, #100, Honolulu HI 96813

Dawnland tells the story of the first government-sanctioned truth and reconciliation commission in the U.S., investigating the devastating impact of Maine’s child welfare practices on Native American communities. With intimate access to this groundbreaking process, the film reveals the untold narrative of Indigenous child removal in the United States.

 

RUMBLE: The Indians Who Rocked the World
By Catherine Bainbridge and Alfonso Maiorana

Wednesday, January 16, 2019 | 5:00 – 7:00 pm
Impact Hub, 1050 Queen Street, #100, Honolulu HI 96813

Rumble brings to light a profound and missing chapter in the history of American music: the Indigenous influence. Featuring music icons Charley Patton, Mildred Bailey, Link Wray, Jimi Hendrix, Jesse Ed Davis, Buffy Sainte-Marie, Robbie Robertson, Randy Castillo, and Taboo, Rumble shows how these pioneering Native musicians helped shape the soundtracks of our lives.

 

Won’t You Be My Neighbor?
By Morgan Neville

February 2019, TBD

For over 30 years, Fred Rogers was beamed daily into homes across America where he and his cast of puppets and friends spoke simply and directly to young children about some of life’s weightiest issues. There wasn’t anything like Mr. Rogers on TV before and there hasn’t been since. In Won’t You Be My Neighbor?, Academy Award-winning filmmaker Morgan Neville looks back on Rogers’ radical legacy of love and kindness.

 

The Providers
By Laura Green and Anna Moot-Levin

Wednesday March 13, 2019 | 5:00 – 7:00 pm
Impact Hub, 1050 Queen Street, #100, Honolulu HI 96813

Set against the backdrop of the physician shortage and opioid epidemic in rural America, The Providers follows three “country doctors” in New Mexico at clinics offering care to all, regardless of ability to pay. As their personal struggles at times reflect those of their patients, the providers work to reach rural Americans who would otherwise be left without healthcare.

 

Charm City
By Marilyn Ness

Wednesday, April 10, 2019 | 5:00 – 7:00 pm
Impact Hub, 1050 Queen Street, #100, Honolulu HI 96813

Filmed during three years of unparalleled violence in Baltimore, Charm City delivers a powerfully candid portrait of those on the frontlines. With grit, fury, and compassion, a group of police, citizens, community leaders, and government officials grapple with the consequences of violence and try to reclaim their city’s future.

 

Wrestle
By Suzannah Herbert and Lauren Belfer

Wednesday May 8, 2019 | 5:00 – 7:00 pm
Impact Hub, 1050 Queen Street, #100, Honolulu HI 96813

Wrestle is an intimate, inspiring coming of age portrait of the wrestling team at a struggling high school in Huntsville, Alabama. As they fight towards the state championship, wrestlers Jailen, Jamario, Teague, and Jaquan face injustices and challenges on and off the mat, grappling with obstacles that jeopardize their success, while their coach wades into the complexities of class and race in the South.

 

 

KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall



KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall

“KĀKOU” means “all of us.” But it doesn’t mean we all agree.

 

When we can speak to each other honestly and listen earnestly… When we recognize that we are all in this together… When we are engaged in working toward a common goal, that is “kākou.”

 

PBS Hawai‘i hosts a periodic series of live town hall events called KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall. You can email us with your thoughts in advance or during the live conversation at kakou@pbshawaii.org, or post on Twitter using the #pbskakou hashtag. The town hall will also be live streamed on pbshawaii.org and on Facebook Live, where you can also join the conversation.

 

 

Join The Conversation Online!
#PBSKakou

KĀKOU: HAWAI‘I'S TOWN HALL – Join the Conversation

 

Join the online conversation about KĀKOU by using the #PBSKakou hashtag on Twitter. See what your community has said so far!

 




PACIFIC HEARTBEAT
Visions in the Dark: The Life of Pinky Thompson

 

This film is a Hawaiian story of pain, promise, challenge, triumph and leadership. Sustaining a serious eye wound in Normandy during WWII that left him in the dark for two years, Myron “Pinky” Thompson emerged with a clear vision of his purpose in life. Thompson would go on to be a social worker, mentor and revered leader in the Native Hawaiian community who left a legacy of positive social change, pride in Pacific heritage and a strong sense of native identity among Hawaiians that flourishes today.

 

 

AMERICAN MASTERS
Andrew Wyeth

 

Uncover the hidden depths and complex inner life of the iconic artist Andrew Wyeth. With his life’s work as a background, examine his wide range of influences, including modern artists, war, film and the African American community.

 

Through unprecedented access to Wyeth’s family members, including sons Jamie and Nicholas Wyeth, and never-before-seen archival materials from the family’s personal collection and hundreds of Wyeth’s studies, drawings and paintings, American Masters presents the most complete portrait of the artist yet — bearing witness to a legacy just at the moment it is evolving.

 

 

Ex Libris:
The New York Public Library

 

Frederick Wiseman’s film, Ex Libris – The New York Public Library, goes behind the scenes of one of the greatest knowledge institutions in the world and reveals it as a place of welcome, cultural exchange and learning. With 92 branches throughout Manhattan, the Bronx and Staten Island, the library is a resource for all the inhabitants of this multifaceted and cosmopolitan city, and beyond.

 

 

SEASONING THE SEASONS SPECIAL
Japanese Americans in Hawai‘i, Part 2: The Proud Families

SEASONING THE SEASONS SPECIAL - Japanese Americans in Hawai‘i, Part 2: The Proud Families

 

The Japanese community in Hawai‘i grew and flourished before WWII, but their lives were turned upside down on December 7, 1941, when Japanese planes attacked Pearl Harbor. This program looks at the story of people who survived these tempestuous times, continuing to love two different nations and cultures.

 

 

NĀ MELE
Pomaika‘i Lyman

NĀ MELE: Pomaika‘i Lyman

 

Singer/musician Pomaika‘i Lyman grew up under the guidance of a talented musical family, the Keawe Aiko ‘ohana. Her special mentor was none other than a beloved and legendary voice in Hawaiian music, her grandmother, Genoa Keawe. Lyman steps into the spotlight in this episode of our traditional Hawaiian music series. She’s accompanied by Po‘okela Wood on guitar, Keao Costa on bass, and Jeff Au Hoy on steel guitar. Lyman’s family and friends also share the stage to perform songs including “Beautiful Kahana” and the popular hula song “Noho Paipai,” also known as the “Rocking Chair Hula.” Lyman’s family brought some of Aunty Genoa Keawe’s furniture to our studio to bring a sense of mana and a feeling of home.

 

 

Here is a special digital short

 

 

 

SEASONING THE SEASONS SPECIAL
Japanese Americans in Hawai‘i, Part 1: The Women Pioneers

SEASONING THE SEASONS SPECIAL - Japanese Americans in Hawai‘i, Part 1: The Women Pioneers

 

This program focuses on the Japanese women of Hawai‘i, going back to the time when they first arrived in the Islands to work the sugarcane fields. We also hear stories of the women who supported themselves through the cultivation of the anthurium flowers, and of a hotel passed down from grandmother to grandchildren.

 

 

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