Ewa Makai Middle School

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 906 – 2017 HIKI NŌ Fall Challenge

 

This episode features stories from the 2017 HIKI NŌ Fall Challenge. In September of 2017, five high schools and nine middle schools participated in a challenge in which teams had exactly four days to conceptualize, shoot, write, and edit a HIKI NŌ story based on a specific theme. No work could be done on the stories prior to the production window because the theme was not revealed until the start of the four-day sprint. The theme of this challenge was “What it’s Like to Walk in Another Person’s Shoes.” No teachers, or adults of any kind, could provide hands-on assistance. It was all up to the students.

 

TOP STORIES
Included in this episode are the winners of the Middle School and High School Divisions of the 2017 HIKI NŌ Fall Challenge. The Middle School winners were from ‘Ewa Makai Middle School in the ‘Ewa district of O‘ahu. Their story “Lolita” features a drag queen in his early 20s who explains how taking on his drag persona of Lolita gives him confidence and helps him cope with a sometimes difficult life. The winning High School story, “Hurricane Harvey Relief,” was created by students at Kalaheo High School in Windward O‘ahu. It follows a group of volunteers who put themselves in the shoes of Houston’s Hurricane Harvey victims and helped to collect goods toward the relief effort.

 

ALSO FEATURED
–Students from Maui High School created a story about what it’s like to walk in the shoes of a teen transitioning to a new gender.

 

–Students from Kapa‘a High School on Kaua‘i featured the school band president who is successful at what he does because he tries to walk in the shoes of his fellow musicians.

 

–Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu stress the importance of empathy in dealing with people who suffer from a very painful condition known as Fibromyalgia.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle show us that walking in the shoes of someone who moved to Hawaiʻi for a better life helps us to better appreciate our island home.

 

–Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i help us to consider what it’s like being a teenager who is prone to suicide.

 

–Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului tell the story of a cobbler who creates custom shoes for people who can’t wear conventional footwear.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 8, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 9, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 921: Compilation of stories from Season 9

 

This compilation show features some of the top stories from the spring quarter of the 2017-2018 school year. Each of the stories presents an excellent example of an element that is essential to successful dramatic storytelling: change.

 

–Students at Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului tell the story of a former I.T. professional who makes a mid-life career change by returning to his family’s farming roots – but in a modern, 21st century way.

 

–Students at Waia‘nae Intermediate School in West O‘ahu tell the story of a young woman whose desire to join the men’s football team at her school causes people close to her to change their attitudes.

 

–Students at Sacred Hearts Academy in the Kaimukī district of O‘ahu follow the change from student to career professional in a mentoring program known as Girls Got Grit.

 

–Students at Wheeler Middle School in Central O‘ahu show how simple ingredients like flour and glue change into a gooey and creative substance that will keep kids occupied for hours on end.

 

–Students at Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Pukalani profile a fitness instructor who helps senior citizens adapt to the physical changes that occur in the aging process.

 

–Students at Dole Middle School in the Kalihi district of O‘ahu highlight a very basic form of change: learning something new. In this case, we learn how to perform a traditional Filipino dance known as the tinikling.

 

–Students from H.P. Baldwin High School in Wailuku, Maui, follow a young man through his grueling recovery after the car he was driving was struck by a drunk driver.

 

–Students from Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu follow the change in a dog as she goes from being homeless to finding her permanent, forever home.

 

This special episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by two aspiring journalists from Sacred Hearts Academy on O‘ahu: Shelby Mattos and Rebecca Meyer.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 919: Stella, a homeless dog and other stories

 

TOP STORY

 

Students from Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu tell the story of Stella, a homeless dog who, with the help of volunteers from the non-profit group Fur-Angel Foundation, finally finds a forever home and owner. The story also follows the fate of Stella’s puppies, who were stricken with the deadly canine parvovirus.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

–Students from Mid-Pacific on O‘ahu tell the story of an ‘ukulele virtuoso who made a life-changing career decision.

 

–Students from Lahainaluna High School on Maui showcase their school’s annual David Malo Day celebration.

 

–Students from Kalāheo High School on O‘ahu uncover a World War II relic embedded in a hillside.

 

–Students from Moloka‘i High School on Moloka‘i show how to make paint using their island’s prolific red dirt.

 

–Students from James Campbell High School on O‘ahu profile a gifted jazz saxophone player.

 

–Students from Kapa‘a High School on Kaua‘i tell the story of a pair of long-distance running brothers who partner in a very unique way.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students at Kalama Intermediate School in Makawao, Maui.

 

 


HIKI NŌ
Episode #823

 

This episode features stories from the 2017 HIKI NŌ Spring Challenge, in which production teams from HIKI NŌ schools took the challenge of creating stories on the theme Mālama Honua (Taking Care of Our Island Planet) over three days. The theme – which is based on the mission of the Polynesian Voyaging Society’s world-wide voyage – was revealed to the students at the beginning of the three-day production time limit.

 

TOP STORY
Students from Nānākuli High and Intermediate School on O‘ahu present their interpretation of Mālama Honua in a story about Veronika Sumyatina, a foreign exchange student from war-torn Ukraine who finds a new home, and the meaning of aloha, at Nānākuli High and Intermediate School. Veronika explains that home is much more than a roof over one’s head – home is “where your heart is.” By accepting an outsider as one of their own, the Nānākuli students do their part in taking care of our island planet.

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu feature a female angler whose love of fishing is matched only by her respect for the eco-system from which she partakes.

 

–Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu follow a woman who volunteers to mend and replace the pedestrian walking flags that keep people safe when crossing the very dangerous Farrington Highway.

 

–Students from Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu feature the OSPCA, a non-profit organization that cares for abandoned and neglected cats and dogs.

 

–Students from Punahou School on O‘ahu follow a group of motivated community members who are cleaning up Kawainui Marsh in Kailua.

 

–Students from Kalama Intermediate School in Upcountry Maui show how recycling is a way of life on their campus.

 

–Students from Kapolei High School on O‘ahu follow the eco-friendly phenomenon of Hydro Flasks.

 

This episode is hosted by Hali‘amaile Kealoha and Hulukoa Nunokawa, both seniors at Kamehameha School Kapālama.

 

This program encores Sunday, Nov. 12, at 12:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #824

 

This special edition of HIKI NŌ highlights some of the best stories from the spring quarter of the 2016-2017 school year. The outstanding HIKI NŌ stories in this compilation show include:

 

“Mochi Pounding” from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului, Maui:
The story of a Maui family who continues their annual New Year’s tradition of mochi pounding, despite the recent passing of the family matriarch.

 

“Tough Vice-Principal” from Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu:
A classic “don’t judge a book by its cover” story about a vice-principal whose tough exterior belies her heart of gold.

 

“Fashion Entrepreneurs” from Sacred Hearts Academy on O‘ahu:
Two Honolulu-based fashion entrepreneurs mentor young local designers who are trying to break into the business.

 

“Tie-Dye Artist” from Kalani High School in East Honolulu:
Inspired by 1960s cultural icons like The Beatles, a Honolulu teenager launches her own line of tie-dye clothing.

 

“Diabetic Athlete” from Waiakea High School in the Hilo district of Hawai‘i Island:
A star high school athlete faces his toughest opponent off the court: Type 1 Diabetes.

 

“Pedestrian Walking Flags” from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu:
A woman takes it upon herself to sew red flags that are held up by pedestrians as they cross the notoriously dangerous crosswalks in Waiʻanae. The red flags go a long way in alerting drivers that there are pedestrians crossing in front of them.

 

“The Fact of You” from Kaua‘i High School in Lihue:
A personal essay about identifying one’s authentic nature and remaining true to it.

 

“Ukrainian Student” from Nānākuli High and Intermediate School in West O‘ahu:
The story of a foreign exchange student from Ukraine who embraces and reciprocates the Aloha Spirit she finds in Nānākuli.

 

This special compilation show is hosted by Moanalua High School student Camryn Tabiolo, who will be entering her school’s HIKI NŌ program in the fall of 2017.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 2, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 3, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #819

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from Kapolei High School on O‘ahu present a story on the Hawai‘i-themed artwork engraved on the columns of O‘ahu’s rail project. The column art was designed by local architect Daniel Kanekuni and, according to HART spokesperson Bill Brennan, adds a sense of place and local identity to the rail project. Rail proponents and opponents alike feel that the column artwork is a good thing. However, some rail opponents, such as UH Professor of Civil Engineering Panos Prevedouros, feel that the real eye-sore will be the elevated rail stations. Says Prevedouros, “How much lipstick do they think they can put on that pig?”

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

–Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School show how a Kahului family’s mochi- pounding tradition continues, despite the recent loss of the family matriarch who had been the heart of the event.

 

–Students from Hawai‘i Technology Academy in Leeward O‘ahu show us the proper way to pack a military care package.

 

–Students from Konawaena High School on Hawai‘i Island profile a Konawaena graduate who went on to form the internationally renowned heavy metal reggae band Pepper.

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu profile a lesbian couple at their school who work to spread the joy of diversity and the message of tolerance for those who are different.

 

–Students from Maui High School profile a star athlete who had to sit out the football season because of a heart condition but continued to inspire his teammates by volunteering as an assistant coach.

 

This program encores Saturday, May 27, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, May 28, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


HIKI NŌ
Episode #818

 

TOP STORY
Students from Kaua‘i High School in Lihu‘e introduce a new story genre to HIKI NŌ: the Personal Essay. In her essay “The Fact of You,” Kaua‘i High School student Haven Luper-Jasso explores the nature of truth. It opens with her thoughts on the matter: “The word FACT can be defined as a true piece of information. And in our day and age where information and messages are bombarding us from every angle every second of the day, that’s all we really want in life: truth.”

 

She goes on to explore not just the nature of factual truth, but also the truth within one’s own self: “Your life is the greatest masterpiece you will ever produce…Let it be genuine, true to who you are. Because that is who you were created to be. And that is a fact I can guarantee with a hundred percent certainty.”

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

–Students from Waipahu High School on O‘ahu explore the mysterious origins of their studentbody-wide cheering tradition known as the Arthur Awards.

 

–Students from Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu uncover the caring person behind the tough façade of their vice principal.

 

–Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i tell the story of Team Unify, a non-profit organization that helps students without disabilities bond with students who have disabilities.

 

–Students from Sacred Hearts Academy on O‘ahu introduce us to two local fashion designers who give younger, up-and-coming designers hands-on experience in the fashion business.

 

–Ka‘ala Elementary School on O‘ahu makes its HIKI NŌ debut with a video primer on aquaponics. (Ka‘ala Elementary School is only the second elementary school to produce for HIKI NŌ. The first was Kainalu Elementary School in windward O‘ahu.)

 

This program encores Saturday, April 8, at 12:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hawaiian Value: Kuleana

 

This episode is the second in a series of six shows in which each episode focuses on a specific Hawaiian value. The Hawaiian value for this show is kuleana, which means responsibility. Each of the following stories reflects this theme:

 

The top story comes from the students at Waianae High School in West Oahu. They feature Waianae High School graduate and UFC (Ultimate Fighting Championship) fighter Max Holloway, who feels it is his kuleana to represent the Waianae community in the most positive way possible when he competes. Max also takes his responsibilities to his wife and young son very seriously. Having been severely neglected by his own parents, Max wants to make sure his son does not have to suffer the same sort of childhood.

 

Also featured are student-created stories from the following schools:

 

Kamehameha Schools Kapalama (Oahu): A one-day community service event for Kamehameha Schools Kapalama seniors builds character and nurtures lifelong community service.

 

Kainalu Elementary School (Oahu): Student Caleb McCrillis was concerned when his great grandmother became the victim of a phone scam. He felt it was his kuleana to warn other senior citizens about phone scams and produced a PSA offering tips on how seniors can avoid being conned.

 

Aliamanu Middle School (Oahu): Students and teachers at Aliamanu Middle School take responsibility and raise awareness of the hazards for pedestrians jaywalking near a major intersection in Salt Lake.

 

Keaau High School (Hawaii Island): Keith “Brudda Skibs” Nehls starts the non-profit organization, Basic Image, that maintains Honolii and other Hawaii Island parks for free.

 

Ewa Makai Middle School (Oahu): Although it has earned him a reputation as the meanest teacher at Ewa Makai Middle School, science teacher David Wong has made it his kuleana to teach his students what they need to succeed in high school and beyond.

 

Moanalua High School (Oahu): Moanalua High School student Jacob Genovese deals with the responsibilities and challenges of fatherhood, full-time work and school.

 

This episode is hosted by Kaimuki High School in Honolulu.

 

This program encores Saturday, Aug. 13 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Aug. 14 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Without Home

 

TOP STORY

 

Students from Waianae High School in West Oahu present their story, “Without Home”, about the Hale Aole homeless encampment near the boat harbor in Waianae. What makes Hale Aole different from other homeless encampments on Oahu is that the residents have established a set of rules for their community and take it upon themselves to enforce those rules. Although the residents of Hale Aole are technically homeless, many consider the encampment their home because it provides them with a safe haven. As one of the residents says: “How do know if it’s home? If it’s your sanctuary.”

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

Students from Sacred Hearts Academy on Oahu tell the story of a young volunteer at the Honolulu Zoo who is following in the footsteps of her zoo employee parents.

 

Students from Kalani High School on Oahu show us the latest in 3-D printing with a computer-controlled laser-cutter.

 

Continuing the theme of high-tech innovations, we visit the HIKI NŌ archives for a look back at an Ewa Makai Middle School (Oahu) story on their high-tech physical education program.

 

Students at Seabury Hall Middle School on Maui show us the history and present-day use of mules in Haleakala National Park.

 

Students at Moanalua High School on Oahu tell of the obstacles that faced a high school volleyball player when he transferred from Saint Louis School to Moanalua High School.

 

This program encores Saturday, May 28 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, May 29 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

 

Hawaii public schools score big in national TV competition

Press Release Header

 

HONOLULU – Hawaii schools walked away with 34 awards at the 13th annual Student Television Network (STN) competition in Atlanta, held March 10-13. Click here to view the complete list of Hawaii results, lower on this page.

 

Close to 3,000 middle and high school students from across the U.S. gathered to compete in on-site, time-restricted contests in video journalism, television production, filmmaking, music videos, commercials, and public service announcements. All of the Hawaii schools that attended the competition are public schools and participants in PBS Hawaii’s HIKI NŌ student news network.

 

Last year, Hawaii schools brought home 28 awards from the STN Convention. As in the last few STN competitions, the number of awards won by Hawaii schools was notably high in comparison to states with larger populations, such as California, Florida, and Texas.

 

“Without a doubt, the stellar performance by Hawaii schools at STN is due to the work our schools have done with HIKI NŌ and PBS Hawaii,” said Kevin Matsunaga, Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School media teacher and STN regional board member. “Our students have developed solid technical and storytelling skills through our workshops throughout the year. Our Hawaii media teachers have worked tirelessly, as well, and the outstanding work their students have done at these competitions is proof that HIKI NŌ is making a huge difference in the lives of our students.”

 

The Hawaii school awards count was led by Maui Waena Intermediate’s nine, followed by Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School with eight, and Waianae High School with six. There were a number of first-time awardees among the Hawaii schools, including Kapolei High School, Waipahu Intermediate School, and Ewa Makai Middle School.

 

Ewa Makai media teacher Ethan Toyota said his students were “in shock” when they won two honorable mention awards in the commercial and public service announcement categories. “We wouldn’t be here without all the training and help HIKI NŌ has contributed in getting us off the ground,” he said.

 

“HIKI NŌ offers students the ideal preparation for this national competition and it also readies them for different professional paths — by teaching them to work their way through challenges and deliver quality work on tight deadlines,” said Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawaii President and CEO.

 

“Congratulations to all of the students that participated in this rigorous competition in which they represented their schools and our state well,” said Kathryn Matayoshi, Hawaii Department of Education Superintendent. “PBS Hawaii is a valued partner for providing opportunities like HIKI NŌ. The teamwork and use of technology needed to create these quality productions align with the Department’s mission to help our students connect with their communities and be lifelong learners.”

 

 

2016 Student Television Network – Hawaii Winners:

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL CONVENTION RE-CAP 

2nd Place – CHIEFESS KAMAKAHELEI MIDDLE SCHOOL (Kauai)

3rd Place — MAUI WAENA INTERMEDIATE (Maui)

 

HIGH SCHOOL CONVENTION RE-CAP 

Honorable Mention — WAIANAE HIGH SCHOOL (Oahu)

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL SPOT FEATURE 

2nd Place — CHIEFESS KAMAKAHELEI MIDDLE SCHOOL (Kauai)

3rd Place — MAUI WAENA INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Maui)

 

LEAD STORY 

3rd Place — MOANALUA HIGH SCHOOL (Oahu)

 

MAN ON THE STREET

3rd Place — MOANALUA HIGH SCHOOL (Oahu)

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL MOVIE TRAILER 

Honorable Mention — CHIEFESS KAMAKAHELEI MIDDLE SCHOOL (Kauai)

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL NAT. PACKAGE
(No announcer, only interview soundbites and natural sound)

1st Place — WAIANAE INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Oahu)

2nd Place — CHIEFESS KAMAKAHELEI MIDDLE SCHOOL (Kauai)

Honorable Mention—MAUI WAENA INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Maui)

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL COMMERCIAL 

1st Place — MAUI WAENA INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Maui)

Honorable Mention — EWA MAKAI MIDDLE SCHOOL (Oahu)

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL PSA (Public Service Announcement) 

1st Place — CHIEFESS KAMAKHELEI MIDDLE SCHOOL (Kauai)

3rd Place — MAUI WAENA INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Maui)

Honorable Mention — EWA MAKAI MIDDLE SCHOOL (Oahu)

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL BREAKING NEWS

1st Place — MAUI WAENA INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Maui)

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL ANCHOR TEAM

1st Place — CHIEFESS KAMAKAHELEI MIDDLE SCHOOL (Kauai)

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL MUSIC VIDEO

1st Place — WAIPAHU INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Oahu)

2nd Place — MAUI WAENA INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Maui)

Honorable Mention — CHIEFESS KAMAKAHELEI MIDDLE SCHOOL (Kauai)

 

HIGH SCHOOL MUSIC VIDEO

Honorable Mention — KAPOLEI HIGH SCHOOL (Oahu)

 

CRAZY 8’s
(In these categories, schools had eight hours to complete an eight-minute show)

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL BROADCAST NEWS MAGAZINE

Honorable Mention — MAUI WAENA INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Maui)

 

TV SCRIPTED SITCOM PILOT

Honorable Mention — WAIAKEA HIGH SCHOOL (Hawaii Island)

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL SHORT FILM—FICTION

1st Place — CHIEFESS KAMAKAHELEI MIDDLE SCHOOL (Kauai)

2nd Place — MAUI WAENA INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Maui)

3rd Place — WAIPAHU INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Oahu)

 

STN FILM EXCELLENCE AWARDS (entries submitted prior to the competition)

 

BEST FILM – LIVE ACTION

Waianae High School (Oahu)

 

BEST FILM – ANIMATED

Waianae High School (Oahu)

 

BEST MONTHLY NEWS BROADCAST – SOUTH PACIFIC REGION

Waianae High School (Oahu)

 

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

Waianae High School (Oahu)

 

BEST SOUND DESIGN – ORIGINAL SCORE & MUSIC

Moanalua High School (Oahu)

 

BEST WRITING

Waianae High School (Oahu)

 

BEST DIRECTING

Moanalua High School (Oahu)

 

Download this Press Release

 

For questions regarding this press release:

 

Contact: Liberty Peralta
Email: lperalta@pbshawaii.org
Phone: 808.973.1383

 

Contact: Donalyn Dela Cruz, Hawaii State Department of Education
Email: Donalyn_Dela_Cruz@hawaiidoe.org
Phone: 808.586.3232

 

PBS Hawaii is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Hawaii’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawaii and Hawaii to the world. PBSHawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

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