farming

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Canefield Songs: Holehole Bushi

 

In this new film, Professor of Anthropology Christine Yano explains, “If we want to know something of what some of these womenʻs lives were like…we could do no better than to listen to their own words, as expressed through song.” The women that Professor Yano is referring to are Japanese immigrants who worked in Hawai‘i’s sugarcane fields in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Through their canefield songs, or holehole bushi, these women sang about their joys and sorrows of trying to start life in a new world. Hosted and narrated by ukulele virtuoso Jake Shimabukuro, the film tells the story of music teacher Harry Urata, and his efforts to record, preserve and perpetuate these musical oral histories.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 907 – 2017/2018 Fall Semester Compilation

 

This special compilation show features some of the top stories from the Fall Semester of the 2017/2018 school year. In all of the selected stories, HIKI NŌ students explore the truth about the people they are featuring.

 

TOP STORY
Students from Moanalua High School in the Salt Lake district of O‘ahu profile Perry “Mooch” Fernandez, a surf instructor headquartered at the “Bowls” break near Ala Moana Beach Park. Halfway through the story, it is revealed that “Mooch”, having separated from his wife, lives out of his van. He not only survives, he thrives – through exchanges of kindnesses with the close-knit community of surfers who consider him a fixture, a mentor, and the center of their lives at “Bowls.”

 

ALSO FEATURED
–Students from Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of a Maui Waena Intermediate School student who does not let his disability, caused by a genetic spinal condition, hold him back from pursuing sports, music and all the joys of life.

 

–Students from Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i tell the story of a woman who discovered her truth through her life-long commitment to dance.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle tell the story of wheelchair-bound school counselor who, after his debilitating diving accident, found his truth by connecting to a Higher Power.

 

–Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu tell the story of a high school student who finds his truth in his aspiration to carry on his parent’s pig farming business.

 

–Students from Kapa‘a High School on Kaua‘i discover the truth of how a Vietnam War veteran copes with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

 

–Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i show how a video about a special-needs elementary school student produced by a classmate led to a greater understanding and acceptance by the student’s peers.

 

–Students from Kaua‘i High School in Lihu‘e express their concerns about their generation’s over-reliance on screens to see and experience the world around them.

 

This special compilation show is hosted by Brooke Kanna and Haven Luper-Jasso, two HIKI NŌ students from Kaua‘i High School who were among the students that participated in PBS Hawai‘i’s live town hall special KĀKOU: Have You Fact-checked Your Truth?

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 15, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 16, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


MOVEABLE FEAST WITH FINE COOKING
Cadanet, France

 

Travel to the interior of Provence when Moveable Feast with Fine Cooking visits Cadenet, France. Host Pete Evans takes a trip to see how the covetable fleur de sel salt is harvested from the pink waters of Aigues Mortes, a region of salt ponds bigger than Paris. Then, Pete meets up with the mother-daughter chef team of Reine and Nadia Sammut to source fresh artichokes from their local field and prepare them at their stellar countryside restaurant. Nadia has made it a point in her family’s restaurant to incorporate gluten-free items after she discovered she had Celiac disease; her mother Reine, who has been the owner of the restaurant for decades, melds her classic techniques with allergy-conscious ingredients. French heritage is found in both the setting and the feast: on the menu are artichokes Provençal, gluten-free focaccia, and a luscious lamb stew.

 

 

MOVEABLE FEAST WITH FINE COOKING
San Luis Obispo, CA

 

In this episode of Moveable Feast with Fine Cooking from San Luis Obispo county, California, Curtis jumps into the waters of Morro Bay Oyster Company, a hub for oyster farming since the early 1900s, with internationally-renowned, California-based chefs David Rosner and Sherry Yard to source local Pacific Gold Oysters. They then journey to San Luis Obispo’s fertile farmlands to visit Rutiz Family Farms, which produces pesticide-free crops. At Edna Valley Vineyard, the chefs prepare a grand feast in front of a beautiful backdrop of the region’s volcanic peaks. On the menu are SLO-sourced ingredients in multiple ways; Sherry serves raw oysters with chile and ginger granita as well as a dessert of caramelized fennel and fruit streudel a la mode; David grills yellowtail and fennel along with roasted oysters.

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Can We Double Local Food Production by 2020?

 

Hawai‘i continues to be heavily reliant on imports to feed its 1.4 million residents and 8 million visitors. About $3 billion a year is spent to ship in approximately 90 percent of our food, with 6 million pounds of food arriving daily by cargo ships and planes. If these ships and planes stopped arriving, Hawai‘i’s food supply would last only 3-10 days. This is why Governor David Ige has set a goal that we double local food production by 2020. What will it take to reach this goal – and can it be done?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and online via Facebook and Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
Farmer/Veteran

 

A combat veteran starts a farm to help cultivate a healthier life outside the Army. While the sense of duty he once felt as a soldier returns, his crippling PTSD remains as he and his wife nervously anticipate the birth of their first child.

 

FRONTLINE
The Fish on My Plate

 

Journalist and author Paul Greenberg (Four Fish; American Catch) spends a year eating only fish. From farmed fish in Norway to the biggest wild fishery in the world off Peru, he travels to investigate the health of the ocean, as well as his own.

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Seeds of Hope

 

Hawai‘i Island filmmaker Danny Miller’s documentary tells the story of Hawai‘i’s return to local and traditional methods of growing food. Through the voices of farmers, teachers, industry experts and community members, it covers traditional Hawaiian agriculture, pressures of urban development, the plantation legacy and solutions to the state’s growing food insecurity.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hosted by Sacred Hearts Academy

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Sacred Hearts Academy in the Kaimuki district of Honolulu.

 

Top Story:
Students from Waianae Intermediate School on Oahu tell the story of Momi Robins-Makaila, a Waianae Intermediate School teacher who has written a book about the domestic abuse she has suffered in her life and the effect it had on her son. TitledCandy Canes and Coke, Robins-Makaila’s book chronicles her abusive relationships and her journey toward healing.

 

Also Featured:
Students at Hawaii Preparatory Academy on Hawaii Island show how teenagers bridge the generation gap by helping senior citizens navigate new technology; students at Kapolei High School on Oahu profile a teenager who does not let his Type 1 Diabetes get in the way of his passion for BMX bike racing; students at Kalaheo High School on Oahu uncover a World War II bunker in Windward Oahu and discover its unique, post-war uses; students at Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle reveal the challenges facing an upcountry Maui farmer and the difficulty of getting food from farm to table; students at King Intermediate School on Oahu feature a tattooed woman who discusses her experiences with workplace attitudes toward her body art; and students at Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School try to uncover a 101-year-old Kauai man’s secret to living a long and healthy life. 

 

 

PACIFIC HEARTBEAT
Nā Loea: The Masters

 

Meet two men who are considered masters in Hawaiian culture: Keone Nunes, a kumu hula (teacher of hula) and master of traditional kakau (tattooing), and Ed Wendt, a pioneer in the taro restoration movement who has helped to re-establish the water rights for all traditional farmers in east Maui.