Filipino

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Canefield Songs: Holehole Bushi

 

In this new film, Professor of Anthropology Christine Yano explains, “If we want to know something of what some of these womenʻs lives were like…we could do no better than to listen to their own words, as expressed through song.” The women that Professor Yano is referring to are Japanese immigrants who worked in Hawai‘i’s sugarcane fields in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Through their canefield songs, or holehole bushi, these women sang about their joys and sorrows of trying to start life in a new world. Hosted and narrated by ukulele virtuoso Jake Shimabukuro, the film tells the story of music teacher Harry Urata, and his efforts to record, preserve and perpetuate these musical oral histories.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 921: Compilation of stories from Season 9

 

This compilation show features some of the top stories from the spring quarter of the 2017-2018 school year. Each of the stories presents an excellent example of an element that is essential to successful dramatic storytelling: change.

 

–Students at Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului tell the story of a former I.T. professional who makes a mid-life career change by returning to his family’s farming roots – but in a modern, 21st century way.

 

–Students at Waia‘nae Intermediate School in West O‘ahu tell the story of a young woman whose desire to join the men’s football team at her school causes people close to her to change their attitudes.

 

–Students at Sacred Hearts Academy in the Kaimukī district of O‘ahu follow the change from student to career professional in a mentoring program known as Girls Got Grit.

 

–Students at Wheeler Middle School in Central O‘ahu show how simple ingredients like flour and glue change into a gooey and creative substance that will keep kids occupied for hours on end.

 

–Students at Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Pukalani profile a fitness instructor who helps senior citizens adapt to the physical changes that occur in the aging process.

 

–Students at Dole Middle School in the Kalihi district of O‘ahu highlight a very basic form of change: learning something new. In this case, we learn how to perform a traditional Filipino dance known as the tinikling.

 

–Students from H.P. Baldwin High School in Wailuku, Maui, follow a young man through his grueling recovery after the car he was driving was struck by a drunk driver.

 

–Students from Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu follow the change in a dog as she goes from being homeless to finding her permanent, forever home.

 

This special episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by two aspiring journalists from Sacred Hearts Academy on O‘ahu: Shelby Mattos and Rebecca Meyer.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 920: Paula Keele, a wellness educator and other stories

 

TOP STORY

 

Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Pukalani profile Paula Keele, a wellness educator who teaches a class called enhanced fitness to senior citizens at Kahului Union Church. Ms. Keele started the program because her mother had become debilitated by foregoing the proper physical therapy after she broke her shoulder. “I really want to make sure that seniors stay healthy for as long as possible,” says Keele. Her students, however, seem to be teaching Keele as much as she is teaching them. “My students have taught me patience,” she says. “They’ve taught me kindness. They’ve set really great examples, almost like mentors, on how I can be better as I get older.”

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

–Students from Seabury Hall Middle School in Upcountry Maui explore the plight of one of the longest surviving species on earth—the sea turtle.

 

–Students from Roosevelt High School in the Makiki district of O‘ahu profile a Japanese immigrant student at Roosevelt who had a hard time fitting in until other students began to respect him for who he is.

 

–Students from Waiākea High School in the Hilo district of Hawai‘i Island introduce us to a dancer who uses dancing to alleviate the extreme pain she suffers from a rare physical disorder.

 

–Students from Dole Middle School in the Kalihi district of O‘ahu teach us the tinikling, a traditional Filipino dance that has participants jumping in and out between two moving bamboo poles.

 

–Students from Wheeler Middle School on O‘ahu tell the story of a young woman who climbs Mt. Kilimanjaro as a means of healing.

 

–Students from Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of a deaf cheerleader who refuses to be called disabled and feels she can achieve anything that a hearing person can.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students at Wallace Rider Farrington High School in the Kalihi district of O‘ahu.

 

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
Dolores/Delano Manongs

 

Dolores/Delano Manongs Meet the indomitable Dolores Huerta, who tirelessly led the fight for racial and labor justice alongside Cesar Chavez, becoming one of the most defiant – and unheralded – feminist activists of the 20th century. The episode also features the short film Delano Manongs, which traces the story of farm labor organizer Larry Itliong and a group of Filipino farm workers who instigated a labor strike in 1965 that brought about the creation of the United Farm Workers Union.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 912: Top Story – Inspirational teacher Emma Erwin

 

TOP STORY
Students from Konawaena High School on Hawai‘i Island tell the personal and inspirational story of one of their teachers. Emma Erwin hiked all 2,650 miles of the Pacific Crest Trail – from Mexico to Canada – as part of her recovery from the trauma of sexual assault. She hiked by herself, taking on the challenge as a way to take back control of her body and her life. Ms. Erwin speaks candidly and shares photos from her remarkable journey.

 

ALSO FEATURED
–Students from Kaua‘i’s Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School in Lihu‘e take us to “Critter Camp,” sponsored by the Kaua‘i Humane Society. These day camps teach children how to get along with animals and take care of them, while having fun with their new four-legged friends.

 

–Students from Waimea High School on Kaua‘i invite us into Unko’s Kitchen, a popular restaurant in Hanapepe. In this busy kitchen we find out how and why Chef Manuel Cabral prepares the local comfort food that keeps residents and tourists coming back year after year.

 

–Students from Lahaina Intermediate School on Maui show us the step-by-step instructions to sew on a button.

 

–Students from Aliamanu Middle School on O‘ahu make the most of their Pearl Harbor location to report this story connecting history to their own lives. Aliamanu students had the opportunity to meet young “Ambassadors of Peace” from Australia, Japan and the U.S. who are using lessons of the past to promote a peaceful future.

 

–Students from Kaua‘i High School in Lihu‘e share the story of a Filipino immigrant from a first-person perspective. Glenn Marcos explains the challenges and rewards of starting his new life on Kaua‘i.

 

–Students from Maui High School in Kahului introduce us to a family learning to embrace what life brings after their baby is born with Down Syndrome. Elias and Stephanie Garcia of Pukalani are also using their family company – Aloha Kettlecorn – to share their blessings and inspire their neighbors.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 911: Focus On Compassion: Self-Identity, Crystal Cebedo update

 

This episode is an encore presentation of a HIKI NŌ special that first aired in the summer of 2017– HIKI NŌ Focus On Compassion: Self-Identity –hosted and co-written by HIKI NŌ alumna and Wai‘anae High School graduate Crystal Cebedo. This encore presentation includes a brief update on Crystal, who is majoring in Marketing and Human Resources at Menlo College in Atherton, California on a full scholarship.

 

The HIKI NŌ stories in this special look at compassion for self-identity in terms of culture, gender, body image, ethnicity, or appearance. They include:

 

“Calcee Nance” from Kaua‘i High School on Kaua‘i: the story of a teen mentor at the Boys and Girls Club whose instinct to nurture and feed others was inspired by her relationship with her late mother.

 

“Kimberly Yap” from Lahainaluna High School on Maui: the story of a young woman whose decisions about her future are complicated by her multicultural identity as a half Filipina, half Micronesian born in Kiribati and raised on Maui.

 

“Mark Yamanaka” from Mid-Pacific on O‘ahu: a feature on Mark Yamanaka, a Nā Hōkū Hanohano Award-winning musician, who overcame internal conflicts about being a non-Hawaiian playing Hawaiian music. He has since been embraced by the Hawaiian music community for his commitment to learning and singing in the Hawaiian language and his skillful guitar playing.

 

“Cosplay” from Waiākea High School on Hawai‘i Island: a look at how cosplay – dressing up as characters from books, movies, or your own imagination – gave a group of high school students the freedom to express their true selves in a creative and fun way.

 

“Body Image” from Maui Waena Intermediate School on Maui: a look at how the images of females onscreen and in magazines had a negative impact on one girl’s self-image and self-confidence.

 

“Through Rachel’s Camera” from ‘Iolani School on O‘ahu: the story of a young woman who uses her camera and art to combat traditional gender stereotypes and to express her identity as a feminist and activist.

 

“Pride and Diversity” from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu: a feature on how the Honolulu Pride Parade and Festival helps support and encourage LGBTQ youth who often don’t see themselves reflected in their school or local communities.

 

“Aurora’s Story” from Wai‘anae Intermediate School on O‘ahu: a look at how one teacher uses her experience with trichotillomania, an impulse disorder that results in her pulling out her hair, to teach her students about self-acceptance.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Focus on Compassion: Self-Identity

 

The third of four Focus on Compassion HIKI NŌ episodes compiles archived stories that center on the theme of compassion for self-identity. This four-episode series is hosted by Crystal Cebedo, a 2016 HIKI NŌ and Wai‘anae High School graduate who is currently attending Menlo College in Atherton, California. The stories in this episode look specifically at compassion for self-identity in terms of culture, gender, body image, ethnicity, or appearance.

 

The outstanding HIKI NŌ stories in this Focus on Compassion show include:

 

“Calcee Nance” from Kaua‘i High School on Kaua‘i: the story of a teen mentor at the Boys and Girls Club whose instinct to nurture and feed others was inspired by her relationship with her late mother.

 

“Kimberly Yap” from Lahainaluna High School on Maui: the story of a young woman whose decisions about her future are complicated by her multicultural identity as a half-Filipina, half-Micronesian born in Kiribati and raised on Maui.

 

“Mark Yamanaka” from Mid-Pacific on O‘ahu: a feature on Mark Yamanaka, a Nā Hōkū Hanohano Award-winning musician, who overcame internal conflicts about being a non-Hawaiian playing Hawaiian music. He has since been embraced by the Hawaiian music community for his commitment to learning and singing in the Hawaiian language and his skillful guitar playing.

 

“Cosplay” from Waiākea High School on Hawai‘i Island: a look at how cosplay – dressing up as characters from books, movies, or your own imagination – gave a group of high school students the freedom to express their true selves in a creative and fun way.

 

“Body Image” from Maui Waena Intermediate School on Maui: a look at how the images of females onscreen and in magazines had a negative impact on one girl’s self-image and self-confidence.

 

“Through Rachel’s Camera” from ‘Iolani School on O‘ahu: the story of a young woman who uses her camera and art to combat traditional gender stereotypes and to express her identity as a feminist and activist.

 

“Pride and Diversity” from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu: a feature on how the Honolulu Pride Parade and Festival helps support and encourage LGBTQ youth who often don’t see themselves reflected in their school or local communities.

 

“Aurora’s Story” from Wai‘anae Intermediate School on O‘ahu: a look at how one teacher uses her experience with trichotillomania, an impulse disorder that results in her pulling out her hair, to teach her students about self-acceptance.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 23, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 24, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


LUCKY CHOW
Filipino Entrepreneurs

 

This series travels across the United States to explore Asian cuisine’s impact on American food culture. Hosted by Danielle Chang, the six-part series explores a wide variety of Asian food and drink and meets the new generation of chefs and entrepreneurs dedicated to keeping traditions alive. The series features renowned chefs and culinary personalities such as Top Chef winner Kristen Kish, YouTube sensation Maangchi, Chinese master chef Susur Lee and ramen entrepreneur Ivan Orkin.

 

Filipino Entrepreneurs
Filipinos comprise the second-largest Asian American population nationwide, yet their cuisine is relatively unknown. PJ Quesada, founder of the Filipino Food Movement, explains Filipino cuisine while feasting at his friend Tim Luym’s restaurant in San Mateo, CA. Then we meet restaurateur Nicole Ponseca, who left her life as an advertising executive in New York to give voice to her culture through food. Finally, the two friends behind Bling Bling Dumplings manufacture thousands of dumplings – from scratch, at home – to serve at festivals.

 

ASIAN AMERICAN LIFE

 

This news magazine series features in-depth reports and stories of the Asian American diaspora for a general audience.

 

Asian American Life is an in-depth news magazine program that addresses topical issues affecting the Asian American communities nationwide and profiles Asian American leaders.

 

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