food

CHRISTOPHER KIMBALL’S MILK STREET TELEVISION: Chicken from Paris to the Middle East

 

In this episode, the team learns how to elevate simple chicken recipes by using techniques and flavors from around the world. Milk Street cook Matthew Card shows Christopher Kimball the best technique to spatchcock a chicken. Nimco Mahamud-Hassan stops by Milk Street to teach how to make chicken soup the Somali way-layering flavors, textures and colors. Later, Matthew shows Chris an easy recipe for za’atar-roasted chicken, and finally, they borrow a technique from France to make chicken en cocotte with Milk Street cook Catherine Smart.

 

 

 

RICK STEVES’ SPECIAL
European Festivals

 

In this one-hour special, it’s party time in Europe. In addition to all its epic history and high culture, Europe also knows how to celebrate — and it does so with amazing gusto. Joining Rick, we drop in on the Continent’s top 10 festivals, each one rich with tradition, great food, and fun with the locals. We run with the bulls at Pamplona, don a mask in Venice for Carnevale, dance with Spaniards at the April Fair, cheer on the horses at Siena’s Palio, hoist a frothy stein at Munich’s Oktoberfest, toss a caber at a Scottish Highland Games, and join European families for their traditional Easter and Christmas celebrations. No museums or galleries…just Europe at play. Filmed on location across Europe, this promises to be a very entertaining hour.

 

 

 

LUCKY CHOW
Innovators

 

Culinary creativity isn’t always found in the kitchen. In today’s day and age, innovation on how and what we eat and drink often happens in unexpected places-like the think tanks of Silicon Valley, suburban garages, and next-gen Chinese fast casual spots. We look into the future with three acclaimed women chefs in the Pacific Northwest; the founder of Pared, the game-changing app that has revolutionized how restaurants hire staff; Robert Wang, who invented the Instant Pot because he was looking to invent something to help him cook healthier food for his children; and Lucas Sin, hotshot chef and founder of Junzi Kitchen, who is leading the charge in bringing greater awareness to the diversity of Chinese food.

 

 

 

JOANNE WEIR’S PLATES AND PLACES
Flavors of the Rhine

 

Joanne takes you to the spectacular castle-filled Middle Rhine Valley, a UNESCO World Heritage site. She visits the Heidelberg Castle, and makes some of her favorite local dishes. Joanne also visits Rudesheim am Rhein to taste some of their famous locally-made brandy. Recipes: Herb spatzle; pork tenderloin with red onions, cabbage and apples.

 

 

 

CURIOUS TRAVELER
Curious Hong Kong: Culture and Traditions

CURIOUS TRAVELER - Curious Hong Kong: Culture and Traditions

 

How did Hong Kong get its name? What is so junky about a junk boat? We get curious about the Big Buddha, the Po Lin Monastery, and the Wisdom Path on Lantau Island. Then, we head to the Kung Wo Tofu Factory to learn a centuries-old tofu-making technique. Christine also takes you inside a Tin Hau Temple, the Man Mo Temple, and a traditional Qipao dress-making shop.

 

 

 

LUCKY CHOW
Generasians

LUCKY CHOW: Generasians

 

A fourth-generation Japanese-American farm (Chino Farms). America’s oldest tofu shop in the hands of a surprising new owner (Ota Tofu). A mother-son relationship built on a passion for food and a love of heritage (Liv Wu and Erling Wu-Bower) . A historic Hollywood cafe that is part culinary hotspot, part Asians-in-Hollywood history exhibit. A former commander in the South Vietnamese army and CIA collaborator who now owns a James Beard award-winning restaurant (William Vuong). These are the incredible stories of immigrant hope, strength, perseverance, and courage that define American greatness and illustrate the richness of the Asian experience.

 

 

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
Eating Up Easter

 

See how climate change and a booming tourism trade threaten the fragile economy of Rapa Nui, also known as Easter Island, and meet the local artists, ecologists and developers balancing their strong cultural heritage with modern-day challenges.

 

INDEPENDENT LENS: Eating Up Easter

 

 

 

FAMILY INGREDIENTS
Lānaʻi, Hawaiʻi ‐ Venison

FAMILY INGREDIENTS: Lana‘i, Hawai‘i — Venison

 

Cultural pride can be found everywhere in world but on the tiny island of Lanaʻi, one woman makes it a way of life. Hula dancer and sustainable hunter Anela Evans is remarkable in many ways but it is the memory of her father and her love of all things Hawaiian that keeps this young woman committed to championing the land she walks on.

 

 

 



INDEPENDENT LENS
Eating Up Easter

Cover story by Jody Shiroma, PBS Hawaiʻi

 

INDEPENDENT LENS film Eating Up Easter premiers Monday, May 25 at 9:00 pm

 

Rapa Nui, also known as Easter Island, is the most remote inhabited island in the Pacific Ocean. How does this island community balance its economic boom of tourism with the fragility of its indigenous culture and environment? That’s the question that native Rapanui filmmaker Sergio Mata‘u Rapu explores in the INDEPENDENT LENS film Eating Up Easter, premiering on PBS Hawai‘i on Monday, May 25 at 9:00 pm. This film, a presentation of Pacific Islanders in Communications and the Independent Television Service (ITVS) was completed in 2018, before COVID-19 travel restrictions.

 

Piru Huke, affectionately known as “Mama Piru,” was a cultural icon and community leader who mobilized coastal cleanups and motivated businesses to recycle.The catalyst for the film came in 2011 when Rapu read a news article about food security in Hawai‘i, which got him thinking about Rapa Nui, his birthplace. “As I learned more about how little food we [on Rapa Nui] grew because building cabins for tourists was more lucrative, and how much we imported contributed heavily to the buildup of trash on the island, I realized that our story was not in food security, but in the rapid development of a tiny island in the middle of the Pacific,” Rapu says.

Pictured, inset: Piru Huke, affectionately known as “Mama Piru,” was a cultural icon and community leader who mobilized coastal cleanups and motivated businesses to recycle.

A local ecologist leads recycling efforts to tackle the mounting trash arriving with tourists and the waves of plastic washing up on shore.

 

Rapu introduces four Native Islanders and the actions they are taking to preserve their culture and environment amidst rapid development. A local ecologist leads recycling efforts to tackle the mounting trash arriving with tourists and the waves of plastic washing up on shore. Two musicians struggle to build a free music school they hope will preserve cultural practices. And Rapu’s father, who was the Island’s first native Governor, attempts to balance traditions against the advantages of development while building a mini-mall to serve the local residents in the Island’s main town.

 

Engineer and musician Enrique Icka (right) works on building a sustainable cultural center and music school using recyclable materials.Engineer and musician Enrique Icka (right) works on building a sustainable cultural center and music school using recyclable materials.

 

Rapu says that while Eating up Easter is a film directed at visitors to Rapa Nui, with the intent of raising awareness of the impact and effect that they are having on the island, it also can bring up larger conversations on protecting the environment for current and future generations.

 

 

 

AMERICAN MASTERS
Julia Child

AMERICAN MASTERS: Julia Child

 

Savor the life and legacy of Julia Child, who introduced French cuisine to America through her public TV series, “The French Chef,” in 1963.

 

 

 

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