Hawaiian

NA MELE
Nina Kealiʻiwahamana & Bill Kaiwa

Nina Keali‘iwahamana & Bill Kaiwa

 

The magic of Hawaii Calls is revived when Nina Keali’iwahamana joins Bill Kaiwa for some traditional Hawaiian classics in this special encore of a classic NA MELE. Nina and Bill are joined for this journey down memory lane by Martin Pahinui on bass, and Steven Hall and George Kuo on guitar.

 

NA MELE
Kawai Cockett and Darlene Ahuna

NA MELE Kawai Cockett and Darlene Ahuna

 

NA MELE features the traditional Hawaiian music of Darlene Ahuna and the late Kawai Cockett. In this vintage performance, Kawai Cockett is backed by Sam Sepitmo and Charlie Wahineho‘okae. Joining Darlene Ahuna are her husband J.J. Ahuna and Led Kaapana. Ha‘aheo Cockett provides hula artistry.

 

NA MELE
Peter Medeiros

NA MELE Peter Medeiros

 

Slack key artist Peter Medeiros, accompanied by guitarist Josh Silva and bass player Nate Stillman, presents a fun evening of traditional slack key. Joining the trio are the dancers of Pua Ali’i ‘Ilima, led by kumu hula Vicky and Jeff Kānekaiwilani Takamine. Songs performed include “Ulili E,” “He’eia,” “Ke Ala O Ka Rose” and “Kananaka.”

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Voyage of the Hōkūle‘a

 

Witness Hōkūle‘a’s inaugural 1976 journey from Hawai‘i to Tahiti, the preparations leading up to it, and the behind-the-scenes turmoil that threatened to derail the voyage. Rifts are seen among leadership, between leadership and the crew, and among crewmembers. The film by Dale Bell was co-produced by the National Geographic Society and WQED Pittsburgh.

 

NA MELE
Led Kaapana, Dennis Kamakahi & Cyril Pahinui

NA MELE Led Kaapana, Dennis Kamakahi and Cyril Pahinui

 

NA MELE presents a traditional Hawaiian jam session featuring slack key masters Cyril Pahinui, Led Kaapana and the late Dennis Kamakahi. The program includes sentimental classics with each artist taking a turn on lead vocals and guitar.

 

NA MELE
Waipuna

 

Kale Hannahs, David Kamakahi and Matt Sproat of the acclaimed Hawaiian music group Waipuna present their interpretation of Hawaiian music, accompanied by hula dancer Jaimie Kennedy. From “Malama Mau Hawaii,” a selection from Waipuna’s first album, to “E Mau Ke Aloha,” composed by David’s father, Dennis Kamakahi, Waipuna will take you through a joyful musical cycle.

 

PACIFIC HEARTBEAT
Visions in the Dark: The Life of Pinky Thompson

 

This film is a Hawaiian story of pain, promise, challenge, triumph and leadership. Sustaining a serious eye wound in Normandy during WWII that left him in the dark for two years, Myron “Pinky” Thompson emerged with a clear vision of his purpose in life. Thompson would go on to be a social worker, mentor and revered leader in the Native Hawaiian community who left a legacy of positive social change, pride in Pacific heritage and a strong sense of native identity among Hawaiians that flourishes today.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
The Next Journey

 

INSIGHTS convenes Polynesian Voyaging Society leadership and several crewmembers of the Hōkūle‘a voyaging canoe for a live discussion about their Next Journey. Scheduled to appear are the voyaging society’s President Nainoa Thompson, Hōkūle‘a crewmembers Miki Tomita and Eric Co, and University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa President David Lassner, who was a crewmember on Hōkūle‘a’s U.S. East Coast leg.

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 


Hōkūle‘a Programming

By Liberty Peralta

I ka wā ma mua, ka wā ma hope.
In the past, lies the future.

Hawaiian Proverb

Hōkūle‘a - I ka wā ma mua, ka wā ma hope. In the past, lies the future.

©2015 Polynesian Voyaging Society | Photo: ‘Ōiwi TV – Photographer: Bryson Hoe

 

For three years, Hōkūle‘a and its sister vessel, Hikianalia, journeyed 42,000 miles around the world, stopping at more than 150 ports to share the message of “Mālama Honua” (caring for Island Earth). Rigorously trained navigators led the way with traditional Polynesian wayfinding methods, using nature – including wind, water and stars – as their guide.

 

In June, the vessels and their crew returned safely to Hawaiian waters, marking an unprecedented accomplishment in Polynesian voyaging.

 

With the completion of this worldwide voyage, a new chapter is set to begin for Hōkūle‘a and Hikianalia: an eight-month sail to 30 ports throughout the Hawaiian Islands. The Polynesian Voyaging Society calls this leg the most important part of the voyage.

 

“We will go to as many as 70 communities and 100 schools to thank Hawai‘i’s people and share what we have learned with the children,” said Nainoa Thompson, Polynesian Voyaging Society President, and one of the organization’s master navigators.

 

PBS Hawai‘i celebrates this next phase with a collection of interviews and documentaries that revisit the people and events that helped shape the modern resurgence of Polynesian voyaging, and simultaneously, our Pacific Island cultures. Discover how Hōkūle‘a became a revered icon for so many – for Hawai‘i, Polynesia and our Island Earth.

 

LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX: SAM LOW: RAISING ISLANDS (2014)

Tuesday, August 8, 7:30 pm

LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX:
SAM LOW: RAISING ISLANDS (2014)

In this conversation, Sam Low reveals chickenskin moments onboard as Hōkūle‘a’s documentarian, including the optical illusion he’d see when the vessel approached land – an island rising out of the water. For his book, Hawaiki Rising, Low spent hours interviewing his cousin, master navigator Nainoa Thompson. In these moments, Low came to know Thompson’s fears, dreams and vision.

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I: The Next Journey

Thursday, August 10, 8:00 pm

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I:
The Next Journey

INSIGHTS convenes Polynesian Voyaging Society leadership and several crewmembers of the Hōkūle‘a voyaging canoe for a live discussion about their Next Journey. Scheduled to appear are the voyaging society’s President Nainoa Thompson, Hōkūle‘a crewmembers Miki Tomita and Eric Co, and University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa President David Lassner, who was a crewmember on Hōkūle‘a’s U.S. East Coast leg.

 

THE NAVIGATORS: PATHFINDERS OF THE PACIFIC

Thursday, August 10, 9:00 pm

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS:
THE NAVIGATORS: PATHFINDERS OF THE PACIFIC (1983)

Directed by Sam Low and Boyd Estus, this documentary explores the heritage of Polynesian wayfinding, and how indigenous Pacific societies sustained their navigational practices and practitioners. The film features Mau Piailug, who was at that point the last known navigator to be ceremonially initiated on Satawal, an atoll in Micronesia’s remote Caroline Islands.

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS: VOYAGE OF THE HŌKŪLE‘A (1977)

Thursday, August 17, 9:00 pm

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS:
VOYAGE OF THE HŌKŪLE‘A (1977)

Witness Hōkūle‘a’s inaugural 1976 journey from Hawai‘i to Tahiti, the preparations leading up to it, and the behind-the-scenes turmoil that threatened to derail the voyage. Rifts are seen among leadership, between leadership and the crew and among crew members. Co-produced by the National Geographic Society and WQED Pittsburgh.

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS: PAPA MAU: THE WAYFINDER (2013)

Thursday, August 24, 9:00 pm

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS:
PAPA MAU: THE WAYFINDER (2013)

Shortly after Hōkūle‘a was built in the 1970s, a search began for someone who could teach the art of navigation without modern instruments – native knowledge that had been all but lost. Master navigator Mau Piailug of Micronesia agreed to share what he knew. He played a critical role in Hōkūle‘a’s maiden voyage to Tahiti, and the rebirth of Polynesian unity and pride that followed. Produced by Palikū Documentary Films.

 

PACIFIC HEARTBEAT: VISIONS IN THE DARK: THE LIFE OF PINKY THOMPSON (2016)

Thursday, August 31, 9:00 pm

PACIFIC HEARTBEAT:
VISIONS IN THE DARK: THE LIFE OF PINKY THOMPSON (2016)

A serious eye wound sustained in Normandy during World War II left Myron “Pinky” Thompson in the dark for two years. From this, he emerged with a clear vision of his life’s purpose. Thompson left a palpable legacy as a social worker, mentor and leader in the Native Hawaiian community. In the late 1970s, Thompson served as Polynesian Voyaging Society’s President. Presented by Pacific Islanders in Communications.

 

 

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