Hilo High School

HIKI NŌ 3|5|20: 2020 Winter Challenge High School Division | Program

 

This special edition features stories from the High School Division of the 2020 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge. On January 31, 2020, participating elementary, middle school and high school teams were given four days to complete a HIKI NŌ story based on the prompt: “The wisdom of elders brought to life by the young.” Teachers could not provide hands-on help. The students had to conceptualize, research, arrange, shoot, write and edit their stories on their own. The completed stories were scored by members of the HIKI NŌ editorial board based on the following criteria:

 

1.) How well did the story capture the essence of the assigned theme?

2.) How well did the entry fulfill the HIKI NŌ Story Criteria (the criteria used throughout the school year to determine which stories are approved to air on HIKI NŌ)?

3.) How much did production values (the quality of the cinematography, editing and sound) contribute to the overall effectiveness of the story?

 

Based on the cumulative scores, First-Place, Second-Place, Third-Place, and Honorable Mention awards were given in both the middle school and high school divisions. The following High School Division awardees will be featured in this special:

 

–First Place in the High School Division:

 

“The Show Goes On”
The challenge team from Maui High School tells the story of a dance instructor whose love for the art form inspires generations of passionate dancers to continue the cycle of knowledge and inspiration.

 

HIKI NŌ 3|5|20: 2020 Winter Challenge High School Division | Program

 

–Second Place in the High School Division:

 

“Major Advice”
The challenge team from Waimea High School on Kauaʻi tells the story of a retired Army major who empowers generations of JROTC cadets to achieve their goals and become leaders by looking out for their welfare and teaching them hallmarks of success.

 

–Third Place in the High School Division:

 

“More Than Just a Language”
The challenge team from Hilo High School on the Big Island tells the story of a high school student who learned more than language and cultural traditions from her Hawaiian language class. Along with the special bond she formed with her teacher and class, she gained morals and values that she wishes to pass on to her younger brother and those after him.

 

–Honorable Mention in the High School Division:

 

”Intergenerational Practices”
The challenge team from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui tells the story of a Japanese folk dance teacher and a student whose passion for perpetuating the Japanese tradition makes his family and community members proud.

 

HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge stories from Moanalua High School on Oʻahu and Kauaʻi High School are also featured.

 

“No Cost for Kindness”
The challenge team from Moanalua High School on Oʻahu tells the story of a student who learned respect and kindness at home and practices these lessons at school by helping kids in need.

 

“Mālama Huleʻia: Preserving the Past”
The challenge team from Kauaʻi High School tells the story of a non-profit organization that relies on the wisdom and traditions of elders to connect with the past, revitalize Hawaiian lands, and teach the community youth to take care of the environment for years to come.

 

First-place winners will receive $500 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Second-place winners will receive $300 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Third-place winners will receive $200 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Honorable mention winners will receive $100 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 1|23|20: The Student’s Take | Program

 

This special edition features HIKI NŌ students Kallen Wachi (Waimea High School, Kauaʻi) and Kaycee Nakashima (Hawaii Baptist Academy, Oʻahu) convening in PBS Hawaiʻi’s HIKI NŌ editing suite to share their insights, feelings and revelations about some of the top stories from the Fall Semester of the 2019-2020 school year. (Kallen and Kaycee began their HIKI NŌ careers together at Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauaʻi.) The stories Kallen and Kaycee give their take on include:

 

“Suburbia”
A student at H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui shares her inner-most thoughts about becoming a filmmaker in a personal video essay.

 

“Martin Charlot”
Students from Konawaena High School on Hawaiʻi Island follow veteran painter Martin Charlot (son of legendary artist Jean Charlot) as he restores a mural he created 46 years ago for what is now called the Ellison Onizuka Gymnasium at Konawaena High School.

 

“Shy Girl”
Students from Hilo High School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a severely shy female Hilo High student who came out of her shell after she found her niche in her school’s media club.

 

“Chazz’s World”
Students from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui tell the story of Chazz – a high school student who works at a pizza parlor to help his family pay the bills. The story explores the stress and other emotional hardships the situation causes for Chazz.

 

“A Second Chance”
Students from Waiākea High School in the Hilo district of Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of Easten Tanimoto, a young man who, under the influence of psilocybin (hallucinogenic mushrooms), climbed a telephone pole, was electrocuted, then fell to the ground, sustaining serious injuries and severe burns. After a miraculous recovery, Tanimoto has dedicated his life to speaking at schools and inspiring students to make better life choices.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 11|14|19:
The Effects of Deployment on Families and Other Stories

 

TOP STORY

 

“The Effects of Deployment on Families”
Students from Aliamanu Middle School in the Salt Lake district of Oʻahu explore the effects of military deployment on family members. The story focuses on how the impact of a parent’s deployment can be more problematic for younger children than it is with their older siblings.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

“Shy Girl”
Students from Hilo High School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a severely shy female Hilo High student who came out of her shell after she found her niche in her schoolʻs media club.

 

“Miss Filipina Kauaʻi”
Kauaʻi High School Class of 2019 graduate Tiffany Sagucio gives a first-person account of her experience as a contestant in the 2019 Miss Filipina Kauaʻi Pageant. Tiffany produced this story as part of her Gwen Ifill Fellowship for young journalists, named after the iconic PBS NewsHour anchor who passed away from cancer in 2016.

 

“Raised Crosswalks”
Students from Waiʻanae High School in West Oʻahu tell the story of a new pedestrian protection measure launched on Farrington Highway in Waiʻanae—raised crosswalks.

 

“Fishing Line Recycling”
Students from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui report on an effort to reduce the amount of harmful fishing line discarded into our oceans.

 

“Poi Mill”
Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School show us how Native Hawaiian students are learning about their culture through the cultivation and presentation of taro.

 

“Kinai ʻEha”
Students at Kalāheo High School in Windward Oʻahu introduce us to a non-profit organization that provides workforce training for young people who are homeless, incarcerated or just looking for guidance.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
#1012 – One in a Million and other stories

HIKI NŌ Episode 1012: One in a Million and other stories

 

TOP STORY

 

“One in a Million”
Students from Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu feature two cancer survivors who battled with their diseases at a very early age: Lily Mallory, who was undergoing treatment for her cancer at the age of three, and Emi Robison, who was battling leukemia at the age of seven. The girls’ fathers discuss what it was like dealing with their daughters’ life-threatening illnesses at the time. Phil Mallory, Lily’s father, comments on how scary it was to know that the size of his daughter’s tumor indicated that her chances of survival were not very good. Emi’s father, Ryan Robison, created video games with superheroes who defeated cancer in order to help he and his daughter visualize beating the disease. Lily says the experience taught her that “if you really want something, you gotta work hard for it. Life is short, and you really have to do what you want before you don’t have enough time.”

 

Program

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

–Students from Lahaina Intermediate School on Maui profile a cross-fit instructor who helps students find their mojo.

 
–Students from Hilo High School on Hawai‘i Island show the proper way to conduct oneself at a job interview.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Kapālama on O‘ahu show how high school students are discovering the joys of traditional film-based photography.

 

–Students from Waiākea High School on Hawai‘i Island profile a star athlete who faces his toughest opponent off the field: diabetes.

 

–Students from Kea‘au High School on Hawai‘i Island honor the memory of a beloved student who departed far too soon.

 

–Students from Ilima Intermediate School on O‘ahu show us how to make a traditional Maori dance implement.

 

–Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i introduce us to a unique facility that uses friendship and personal bonds to help treat mental illnesses.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students from Iao School in Wailuku, Maui.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Focus on Compassion: Kūpuna

 

The first of four Focus on Compassion HIKI NŌ episodes drawn from the archives compiles stories that center on the topic of kūpuna, or elders. This show is hosted by Crystal Cebedo, a 2016 HIKI NŌ and Wai‘anae High School graduate who is currently attending Menlo College in Atherton, California on a full scholarship. In this episode, the stories highlight the compassion we feel towards our elders or the compassion our kūpuna show us.

 

The outstanding HIKI NŌ stories in this Focus on Compassion show include:

 

–“Elder-Student Talk” from Aliamanu Middle School on O‘ahu: a look at the wisdom shared by The Elders, a group of former global leaders, to Hawaii’s youth and young adults at the Pillars of Peace Conference.

 

–“Papa Fu” from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i: the story of a 101-year old man and the lessons he’s learned and shares from his long life.

 

–“Taro Farmer” from Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i: the story of Kinichi Ishikawa, a 98-year-old 442nd Regimental Combat Team veteran and a life-long farmer, who continues to work the land and mentor the next generation of farmers.

 

–“Scam Story” from Kainalu Elementary School on O‘ahu: a cautionary tale of how senior citizens can fall prey to scam artists and advice on how people can avoid this kind of financial exploitation.

 

–“Remember What’s Important” from Wai‘anae High School on O‘ahu: a look at how a family is drawn together in their creative and compassionate efforts to care for the family matriarch who has dementia.

 

–“Adult Day Care” from Maui Waena Intermediate School on Maui: a feature on how the Maui Adult Day Care Center addresses the needs of the senior population with a staff committed to the nurture, vitality and personalized care of its clients.

 

–“Losing a Parent” from Hilo High School on Hawai‘i Island: the story of how the love of her grandparents helped stabilize one high school student’s life despite the loss of a parent.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 9, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 10, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.